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  • MTDNA results mean???

    I got my MTDNA test and have 9,472 matches at HVR1 and 1,763 HVR1+HVR2. What good is this with so many names? Is the third test worthwhile doing?

    I submitted my mothers for MTDNA and FF but am waiting for the results.

    Sure would appreciate any guidance on how to interpret this.

    Thanks
    Bruce

  • #2
    What are your research goals?

    Regards,
    Jim

    Comment


    • #3
      Good grief! I had exactly 2 matches.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by J Honeychuck View Post
        What are your research goals?

        Regards,
        Jim
        I am hoping to trace my maternal ancestral line to Wales, or to see if that is where they really came from. Along the way, it would be noce to find some new cousins.

        What else can the mtdna test help with as far as research?


        Bruce

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by BruceG View Post
          I am hoping to trace my maternal ancestral line to Wales, or to see if that is where they really came from. Along the way, it would be noce to find some new cousins.

          What else can the mtdna test help with as far as research?


          Bruce
          mtDNA research is really intended for deep ancestry. Thus, I have failed to find out where in Ireland my maternal line is from, but I have found that it is deeply Irish and British. http://tinyurl.com/m9um22

          There might be some academic papers which could help you.

          Make an entry on www.mitosearch.org so people can have a look at your type and markers.

          Regards from Wales (although I'm not Welsh),
          Jim

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Jim.

            I like your map.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BruceG View Post
              I got my MTDNA test and have 9,472 matches at HVR1 and 1,763 HVR1+HVR2. What good is this with so many names? Is the third test worthwhile doing?

              I submitted my mothers for MTDNA and FF but am waiting for the results.

              Sure would appreciate any guidance on how to interpret this.

              Thanks
              Bruce
              It may seem paradoxical, but most people have rare haplotypes. Some people have no matches at all.

              However, there is one very common signature, found in about 10% of Europeans. With results like that, chances are your HVR results are the basal haplotype for haplogroup H: 263G and 315.1C in HVR2, and either no mutations or 16519C in HVR1.

              It is quite possible that the Full Mitochondrial Sequence would reveal some more distinctive mutations. However, the downside is that you can only compare to other people who have the FMS.

              In cases like yours, the best way to use mtDNA is to verify a hypothesis that you've located a common ancestor using conventional genealogy. You could look at it as a 90% chance that you would detect an error, and you could do the FMS to strengthen the HVR match.

              Comment


              • #8
                Dr. Turner,

                And what approximate percentage would you assign to an FMS match? By that percentage, I assume you mean the probability that two FMS matches share a common ancestor within a genealogically relevant time frame.

                Regards,
                Jim

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bkilpatrick View Post
                  Good grief! I had exactly 2 matches.
                  And I have exactly zero.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by J Honeychuck View Post
                    Dr. Turner,

                    And what approximate percentage would you assign to an FMS match? By that percentage, I assume you mean the probability that two FMS matches share a common ancestor within a genealogically relevant time frame.

                    Regards,
                    Jim
                    FTDNA's FAQ gives a 50% probability for a common ancestor within 5 generations for a perfect FMS match.

                    http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/ans...x?faqid=10#486

                    However, they haven't explained the methodology they used to arrive at that figure, and I believe it is over-optimistic. Not that I have an alternative to offer -- I don't think we understand enough about mtDNA mutation rates. What I generally tell people is sort of a truism: sharing a number of "private" mutations (ones not used to define haplogroups) pulls the MRCA toward the present.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J Honeychuck View Post
                      Dr. Turner,

                      And what approximate percentage would you assign to an FMS match? By that percentage, I assume you mean the probability that two FMS matches share a common ancestor within a genealogically relevant time frame.

                      Regards,
                      Jim
                      FTDNA's FAQ gives a 50% probability for a common ancestor within 5 generations for a perfect FMS match.

                      http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/ans...x?faqid=10#486

                      However, they haven't explained the methodology they used to arrive at that figure, and I believe it is over-optimistic. Not that I have an alternative to offer -- I don't think we understand enough about mtDNA mutation rates. What I generally tell people is sort of a truism: sharing a number of "private" mutations (ones not used to define haplogroups) pulls the MRCA toward the present.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        BruceG,

                        So applying Dr. Turner's reply to my own case, I do have one "third mtDNA test" FMS match, and it is also from Ireland. However, we do not appear to share a common ancestor within five generations.

                        Therefore, you should not rush to buy the third test. For the time being, concentrate on paper genealogy to see if you can find your maternal place of origin that way, asking for help if necessary, and let people see your data on www.mitosearch.org to see if it yields any clues.

                        Regards,
                        Jim

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I got lucky I only have 10 matches but I have 2 HRV1 & 2 matches. One with ancestry in Co Roscommon and one from Sligo. My maternal great-great grandmother is from Co Roscommon.

                          Of course that is way too far back to find a paper connection.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ann Turner View Post
                            It may seem paradoxical, but most people have rare haplotypes. Some people have no matches at all.

                            However, there is one very common signature, found in about 10% of Europeans. With results like that, chances are your HVR results are the basal haplotype for haplogroup H: 263G and 315.1C in HVR2, and either no mutations or 16519C in HVR1.

                            It is quite possible that the Full Mitochondrial Sequence would reveal some more distinctive mutations. However, the downside is that you can only compare to other people who have the FMS.

                            In cases like yours, the best way to use mtDNA is to verify a hypothesis that you've located a common ancestor using conventional genealogy. You could look at it as a 90% chance that you would detect an error, and you could do the FMS to strengthen the HVR match.
                            You nailed it perfectly! Would it make more sende to do the FMS on my kit or on my mothers kit?

                            Thanks

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Honeychuck View Post
                              BruceG,

                              So applying Dr. Turner's reply to my own case, I do have one "third mtDNA test" FMS match, and it is also from Ireland. However, we do not appear to share a common ancestor within five generations.

                              Therefore, you should not rush to buy the third test. For the time being, concentrate on paper genealogy to see if you can find your maternal place of origin that way, asking for help if necessary, and let people see your data on www.mitosearch.org to see if it yields any clues.

                              Regards,
                              Jim
                              Hi Jim,

                              I did put my data on mitosearch, thanks. My mothers kit is due in July, so I will wait to see her results.

                              Comment

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