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Could my results be wrong? (showing up under different haplogroup)

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  • #16
    It not only confirms your general haplogroup (E or R, in your case), but it takes you to the deep clade level of understanding.

    The predicted haplogroup is merely based on y-str values &, although, usually right, can be in error & can't be predicted to a very deep level.

    The confirmed haplogroup is solid. Everyone who is R P312+ is a patrilineal descendant of one man estimated to have incurred this mutation between 3,000 BC & 2,500 BC. If you turn out to be P312+, any of your y-DNA matches MUST also be P312+ in order for you to have a common ancestor closer in time than ca 2500 BC.

    Timothy Peterman

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    • #17
      Originally posted by sbrobin View Post
      I spent almost $800 on the comprehensive genome kit. It has now been 3 months (I sent ftdna my swab in February) and I still don't have all of my results from the lab back, so I'm a little hesitant to send them any more money. Can you explain what would be the advantage of doing the SNP test? Does that just confirm your haplogroup? And if so, how does that help me?
      I can understand your reluctance to fork out more money at this stage.

      Whereas STR testing is useful for matching comparatively recent relatives (say to 5 generations or so), SNPs reveal information about your deep ancestry in terms of millennia and thus about potential geographical origins of the various haplogroups as they work their way back in time to Africa.

      Deep clade testing will both confirm your major haplogroup, and determine to the deepest level possible your subclade within that haplogroup (as at the current level of SNP knowledge).

      In my case my major hg is R1b, and deep clade testing has found me to be L48+. Being R1b was nothing special, as that's about the biggest group out there. Indeed, being L48+ is not a lot better because that is probably the largest subclade of R1b. Nonetheless, new SNPs are being discovered every day and sooner or later I'll be eligible to test for new ones which will give me a better idea of "recent" geographical origin (i.e. within say one millennium) which is pretty exciting because from historical writings I have a fair idea of my male line's history back 800 years or so.

      So, if you have a hankering for the anthropological side as well as the genealogical, then SNPs are where it's at and a great many of us keenly await every relevant new discovery and for FTDNA to make the applicable test available for order.

      In summary, with STRs you can talk and compare among your family members; with SNPs you can have truly global conversations.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by gtc View Post
        Being R1b was nothing special, as that's about the biggest group out there.
        The most studied group, yes, by far. But it's far from the biggest haplogroup. The predominant paternal haplogroup in China is O, which probably accounts for 25% of all living men.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by nathanm View Post
          The most studied group, yes, by far. But it's far from the biggest haplogroup. The predominant paternal haplogroup in China is O, which probably accounts for 25% of all living men.
          Yes indeed, I should have said European group.

          As for Chinese, I have many of them as friends and I cannot get even one of them interested in any of this stuff, LOL!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by T E Peterman View Post
            It not only confirms your general haplogroup (E or R, in your case), but it takes you to the deep clade level of understanding.
            Wow, I think you just really helped explain the DNA testing for me. So if I turn up to have a confirmed haplogroup of R1b1a2a1a1b4, that means anyone else with that same confirmed group definitely shares a grandfather with me at least somewhere down the line?

            If you don't mind further indulging me, if I have a confirmed haplogroup of R1b1a2a1a1b4 and someone else has a confirmed haplogroup of R1b1a2a1a1b5a, does that mean that the two of us also definitely shared a paternal ancestor, however somewhere down the line a mutation occurred, so that is why his markers and haplogroup don't match mine?

            Also, the administrator of the group corrected my listing and I'm now showing up correctly on the project. Thanks to everyone for replying.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by gtc View Post

              Whereas STR testing is useful for matching comparatively recent relatives (say to 5 generations or so), SNPs reveal information about your deep ancestry in terms of millennia and thus about potential geographical origins of the various haplogroups as they work their way back in time to Africa.
              While I'm interested in that, my main reason for DNA testing was to try to find out who my 3rd great grandfather is. I haven't gotten a result from it yet, but hopefully as more people join the project, I'll get a match. You guys have convinced me though, and I'll order the Deep Clade test for $89 next month to confirm my haplogroup.

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              • #22
                In the hypothetical case, all of the ancestors down to: R1b1a2a1a1b comprise one patriline. Sometime after the last mutation, two descendants, most likely distant cousins, incurred mutations that created R1b1a2a1a1b4 and R1b1a2a1a1b5. No matter how close their y-str markers appear to be, they could not share a common ancestor after the first of these two mutations among the cousins.

                Timothy Peterman

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