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LOW RESOLUTION (HVR1) Matches, what does it mean

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  • LOW RESOLUTION (HVR1) Matches, what does it mean

    I have 6 LOW RESOLUTION (HVR1) matches, two of them have the same exact mtDNA haplogroup B as mine and the same numbers
    16129A
    16183C
    16189C
    16217C
    16278T
    16390A
    16519C

    Would the other people 4 people listed on my Low Resolution HVR1 matches also
    have the same markers and the same Haplogroup? I have contacted them but
    but the other 4 have not responded.

    At a low resolution Match would we be cousins within the last 6 generations?

    Thanks, I am just a bit confused :-)

    Denise

  • #2
    Originally posted by deniseneufeld View Post
    I have 6 LOW RESOLUTION (HVR1) matches, two of them have the same exact mtDNA haplogroup B as mine and the same numbers
    16129A
    16183C
    16189C
    16217C
    16278T
    16390A
    16519C

    Would the other people 4 people listed on my Low Resolution HVR1 matches also
    have the same markers and the same Haplogroup? I have contacted them but
    but the other 4 have not responded.

    At a low resolution Match would we be cousins within the last 6 generations?

    Thanks, I am just a bit confused :-)

    Denise
    A low resolution match on mtDNA probably isn't significant. It mutates much slower than the part of the Y chromosome used for testing. According to the FAQ (emphasis added):
    Matching on HVR1 means that you have a 50% chance of sharing a common maternal ancestor within the last fifty-two generations. That is about 1,300 years.
    Of course, that also means you might not share a common ancestor in the last 52 generations, so the statistic itself is pretty meaningless. However, you should share the same haplogroup, and B is pretty much only found in Asians and Native Americans.

    Did you test HVR2 also? If not, you may want to upgrade and see if those matches are still exact.

    Comment


    • #3
      HVR1 matching

      Matching at HVR1 would be many generations ago. Here is more on that subject via FAQ (question #17)

      http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/ans...x?faqid=10#484

      Hope this helps you.

      Connie

      Comment


      • #4
        HVR1 is not significant when it comes to Mitochondrial DNA. Its your ancestors thousands of years ago. Haplogroup B can be Oriental or indigenous ( Indian) North/South American. Full Gnome Sequence MTDNA test will tell you if your mother line is Oriental or Indian and will give you your direct mother line. I have many matches on HVR1 but they dont match me on HVR 1 and 2 or on Full Gnome Sequence

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        • #5
          HVR1 low resolution matches

          As others have stated, HVR1 matches are not very significant regarding recent ancestral connections unless the same person(s) also matches with you at both HVR2 AND FMS (FGS). If you have a FMS match, then there is a 90% probability that you and your FMS match share a most recent common female ancestor that lived no longer ago than 16 generations. However, the mtDNA FMS test will also allow you learn more details about your maternal haplogroup (subclades), and therefore give you a better idea about your maternal ethnic ancestry. HVR1 will only give you your basic maternal haplogroup.

          My one single mtDNA FMS match did the Family Finder test and did not show up as a match with me there.

          If you want to identify more recent relative connections, the Family Finder test will do that, but the relative matches will be from both sides of your family tree.

          Judy
          mtDNA J1c2b

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          • #6
            Thanks everyone, that is pretty much what I wanted to know.

            Comment


            • #7
              Why is it only a 50% chance, if you match doing a genome test

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by deniseneufeld View Post
                Why is it only a 50% chance, if you match doing a genome test
                It's at least partly based on the probability of two peoples' ancestors independently mutating to the same genotype. For example, two people may share the value 'C' at mtDNA 16519, which is different from the Cambridge Reference Sequence (CRS) value of 'T'. It's possible this means they descend from a common female ancestor (I mean within a genealogical time frame, not all the way back to mitochondrial "Eve"). But it's also possible they descend from different female ancestors, whose DNA both mutated to 'C' at that location.

                I picked 16519C, both because you listed that as one of your mutations, and Ann Turner devoted a whole column to it in the Journal of Genetic Genealogy. It turns out that specific mutation is found in several different haplogroups.

                Comment


                • #9
                  thanks for your explanation and the link.

                  Comment

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