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  • #31
    HTML Code:
     I love your last sentence; that's a great character trait
    Well not according to my gf.
    If I use the G (genectics)word again
    I may be injured.

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    • #32
      There is someone on the forum whose brother is a 65/67 match to their paternal uncle. Two markers are different.


      A question I'd like an answer to (and fits in with the topic of thread) is.... Do mutations occur as a result of moving to another place? Do people who move away develop new mutations (or in their offspring born at the new location)? Or, do some people develop mutations during their lifetime and they feel compelled to move away when that is happening or has happened?


      I think it is odd that those who stayed stuck, living wheverer they are, didn't mutate further. Why haven't all men mutated to a new modern R1b subclade? Are men in Africa stuck in the old subclade because they stagnated and didn't move away?

      If moving doesn't cause mutations, then what does? I don't believe it is time alone.

      I hope someone is doing a study on that.
      Last edited by rainbow; 21 February 2011, 01:04 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by rainbow View Post
        There is someone on the forum whose brother is a 65/67 match to their paternal uncle. Two markers are different.

        A question I'd like an answer to (and fits in with the topic of thread) is.... Do mutations occur as a result of moving to another place? Do people who move away develop new mutations (or in their offspring born at the new location)? Or, do some people develop mutations during their lifetime and they feel compelled to move away when that is happening or has happened?

        I think it is odd that those who stayed stuck, living wheverer they are, didn't mutate further. Why haven't all men mutated to a new modern R1b subclade? Are men in Africa stuck in the old subclade because they stagnated and didn't move away?

        If moving doesn't cause mutations, then what does? I don't believe it is time alone.

        I hope someone is doing a study on that.
        I don't understand it completely myself, but I believe mutations are for the most part, completely random. They can be caused by external factors, however. So moving to another location won't cause mutations by itself, but something in the environment there might. For instance, different kinds of radiation can cause mutations, certain chemicals are known mutagens, viruses alter their hosts DNA, and I'd guess bacteria or other biological factors can also cause mutations. This shouldn't be a cause for alarm, though. Each one of the three trillion or so cells in our body has a copy of our DNA in its nucleus, and many hundreds or even thousands of our mtDNA. Any of these DNA copies can and do mutate, but a mutation can only be passed if it's in a sperm or egg cell.

        Most mutations, like known STRs and SNPs used in genetic genealogy, are harmless. Detrimental mutations aren't always passed on, because the cells themselves cease to function, or the embryo won't survive gestation.

        And yes, there's tons of research being done in practically every aspect of this field.

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        • #34
          dna studies on why mutations happen

          Thanks Nathan M

          I think it would be a good idea to compare the dna of various generations or siblings, some who stayed put, and some who have wanderlust/moved a lot/travelled a lot to see how many markers (and which ones, and how, and when) have mutated. And to test the dna of people exposed to radiation and dangerous chemicals, and people who had blood transfusions and transplants.

          And for mtdna too. I wouldn't be surprised if the reason I have no FGS matches is because of a recent mutation that occurred with my grandmother, or my mom, or me.
          Last edited by rainbow; 21 February 2011, 02:58 PM.

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