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What migrations have your paternal lineage made from early modern to current?

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  • What migrations have your paternal lineage made from early modern to current?

    Don't have to post real specific regarding current plotting (privacy protection and all) just curious to see the kinds of migrations made within the last 400 years or so, feel free to include some stories regarding why family migrations happened and such.

    My lineage's migrations from the 1600's to now:

    Hatfield Chase, Yorkshire, England ->Stainforth, Yorkshire, England (post 1626)->Whitgift, Yorkshire, England->Blacktoft, Yorkshire, England->Mecklenburg, Virginia (1773)->North Carolinian frontier->Overton County, Tennessee(1810-2011)->Northeast Ohio(Great Depression-2011) [we currently switch residencies between Overton County, Tennessee and Northeast Ohio depending on economy and other factors].

    As for the move from Hatfield Chase to other parts of Yorkshire I can only think of one thing, the drainage. It caused a bit of turmoil among the common folk.
    Last edited by Barreldriver; 6 February 2011, 04:42 PM.

  • #2
    I've got a big brick wall between me and being able to answer this question. My ggf said he and his parents were born in Copenhagen. My first certain evidence is he was in Winnebago County IL when he enlisted in the Union Army in 1862. After the war they moved a few times til settling in Danville IL in 1880, where they stayed until my Dad moved for work in 1933 to Knoxville TN then back to the midwest, Indianapolis IN then Muncie IN where I was born and raised.

    So: ???>COPENHAGEN 1842>ROCKFORD IL 1862>MILITARY SERVICE>??>SPRINGFIELD MO 1872>URBANA IL>MONTPELIER IL>URBANA IL>DANVILLE IL 1880>KNOXVILLE TN 1933>INDIANAPOLIS IN 1936>MUNCIE IN 1950>ALL OVER CREATION (this generation is very mobile!)

    With the help of a fellow N1c1 yDNA haplogrouper, we've downloaded the data of upwards of 600 N hg men from FTDNA projects and ysearch.org. Since exactly ONE of these lists his known ancestral home as Denmark -- that would be me -- I am assuming that we most certainly came from somewhere to Denmark, and perhaps in the more recent past rather than distant past. (If he really came from Denmark at all! I see him changing biographical "facts" in the record as he got older - so who's to say he didn't change a few facts (like name and birthplace) when he got off the boat?)

    Originally posted by Barreldriver View Post
    Don't have to post real specific regarding current plotting (privacy protection and all) just curious to see the kinds of migrations made within the last 400 years or so, feel free to include some stories regarding why family migrations happened and such.

    My lineage's migrations from the 1600's to now:

    Hatfield Chase, Yorkshire, England ->Stainforth, Yorkshire, England (post 1626)->Whitgift, Yorkshire, England->Blacktoft, Yorkshire, England->Mecklenburg, Virginia (1773)->North Carolinian frontier->Overton County, Tennessee(1810-2011)->Northeast Ohio(Great Depression-2011) [we currently switch residencies between Overton County, Tennessee and Northeast Ohio depending on economy and other factors].

    As for the move from Hatfield Chase to other parts of Yorkshire I can only think of one thing, the drainage. It caused a bit of turmoil among the common folk.
    Last edited by dwight; 6 February 2011, 05:30 PM. Reason: should have said it the first time

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    • #3
      I have a similar brickwall in that my last known paternal-tree ancestor claims to have born in Dover, Kent (or on one occasion, in Cambridge), but there's no documentary evidence that he was there. I was hoping that changing tack to looking at y-chr DNA might help, but I've got no matches at all, even at 12 markers. As his estimated dob varies over 4 years as well, I suspect he was fudging it either deliberately or inadvertantly...

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      • #4
        Poland/Lithunaia Baltic regions controlled by Sweden to Vasterbotten/Umea Sweden early 1700s. (Was probably part of the Swedish governing sector, notarian/treasurer, who returned to Sweden after 1721 when they lost control of that area.)

        France to Frederiksberg Denmark mid to late 1700s. Hairdressers, were they escaping the French revolution???

        Skane Sweden to Frederiksberg Denmark mid to late 1700s. Skane was part of Denmark at that time.

        Randers Denmark to New Zealand/Australia 1870s. Asssted migrant scheme for men/families to clear bush, farm land and build railways etc.. Cheap land available in both countries.
        Some members of the family moved between NZ and Aus quite a bit depending on the work and cheapness of land etc..

        Lake Como, Italy to Germany, England, Isle of Man and Ireland late 1700s - early 1800s, to escape from Napoleans advance into Italy. At least 3 generations of the family migrated over a period of time, with cousins working for greeat uncles etc.. One later settled in Vic Australia. Some returned to Italy in the late 1800s. One part of the family are in Brazil, period of migration unknown.

        Ireland to Scotland 1840s. Mainly in the Mid Lothian area. Potatoe famine???

        Ireland/England to Australia mid 1800s. (Tas, Vic and South Aus.)
        Assisted migrant passage for some, convict transportation for others.

        Eng; Derby 1560s to Notts 1700 to Essex 1880s.

        Paternal line strayed "at least' 7 miles from Colchester Essex Eng over the last 300 years.

        Most ancestors stayed within their regional area for generations.
        Last edited by rivergirl; 6 February 2011, 07:48 PM.

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        • #5
          You all have very interesting histories. Especially Rivergirls' French hairdressers leaving France in the late 1700s. I imagine they followed their wealthy, noble, surviving clientele out of France.

          I have a Great Grandfather (not my paternal line) who had younger siblings born in Muncie, Indiana where Dwight's ancestors were at one point. I don't know if my Great Grandfather was also in Indiana or if he stayed behind in the East Coast with relatives.


          My paternal line (my ydna line if I had ydna) cannot be traced before 1906. My paternal line Great Grandfather arrived in New York in 1906 on a ship that left Bremen. The place he claimed to be born in (a town in Slovakia) has no record of his birth. There is a record of him crossing from Canada to Minnesota, USA. And he claimed to be Canadian when he applied for US citizenship in the 1920s. It now appears he went from Slovakia to Norway to Germany (to catch ship) to New York City to North Dakota to Canada to Minnesota and lastly to New Jersey.

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          • #6
            A man on ysearch with the same surname says the family (paternal line) was originally Croatian (many centuries ago).

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            • #7
              Place names in Austria-Hungary

              Rainbow --
              I have found in researching my wife's lines that the nationality assigned in various documents (passenger lists, census, naturalization) does not always correspond to where the actual location is in terms of present day national boundaries. Your mentioning of Slovakia, for example: My wife's Serbian ancestors were from an area that is now in Croatia but that was part of the Kingdom of Hungary in the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the time they lived there. Their place of origin is variously given as Austria, Hungary, Austria-Hungary, Serbia, Croatia, Slovakia, Yugoslavia, The Kingdom of Serbs, Croats & Slovenes, and so on.

              Especially in the old imperial countries, the ethnic origin of the people often did not correspond to the political state that controlled the area -- and the state controlling an area often changed. The German principalities are another example -- a map from the 1800s looks like a patchwork quilt with the areas under one state's control scattered across the map -- not contiguous at all.

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              • #8
                He was listed as Austrian, Slovak, and Czechoslovakian on various records. Oral history is he was Czech. I was helped by the Czechoslovak Genealogical Society International when I was a member years ago. They have lists of all the town names in the various languages (Czech, Slovak, German, Hungarian, etc). They gave me the current Slovak spelling and location and district of the town my Great Grandfather listed as his birthplace (records for that district are kept in a larger town). It is a unique name and found only in Slovakia. My Great Grandfather and Great Grandmother married in the US but they were born different districts in Slovakia. I have her birth certificate/baptismal record from the district she was born in, but his district has no record of him (his true birthdate is unknown and they searched thru several years and have no record with his name. They told me they do have a record of a female baby with the feminine version of his name).

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                • #9
                  Oh, I wish I knew for sure...

                  Since we've been unable to trace our paternal line back earlier than 1750 so far, some of this is educated guesswork. The line is German, and given the present-day distribution of the surname in Germany, it is very likely that in the 1600s the family was living in the Palatinate in what is now southern Germany near the border with France. This theory is also supported by the fact that many Palatinate Germans settled in the part of the country my family emigrated to in the U.S. At some point not long before 1750, one of my ancestors (maybe with their family, maybe alone) boarded a ship and made their way to North America, likely arriving at Philadelphia. What we do know for sure is that in the span of two generations, between 1750 and 1800, the family edged west across Pennsylvania on what would have been the "western frontier" of the time. Around 1800 they stopped moving and settled in Butler County, PA and we've remained ever since, with a small bit of the original land they settled remaining in the family still today. So for over 250 years we've been Pennsylvanians.

                  -WestPA

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                  • #10
                    I have ancestors from Butler County, Pennsylvania. My Logan ancestor moved there and he had a German wife.
                    Small world, huh?

                    Elizabeth

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                    • #11
                      I trace my paternal line, using traditional research , to Dieppe France with the the birth of Pierre Brunet in 1651. He migrated to New France (Quebec). Possibly when 3000 French Huguenot citizens were driven out of France in 1685. His son Thomas married Cathrine Cecire in 1701 began my line in Quebec. My grandfather (born in Quebec)used a homestead act to settle in Alberta were my father and his brothers and sisters were born. They later immigrated to upstate New York.
                      I do not have the results of my testing back yet but my surname matches two people in France who have a haplotype of R1b1b2. Will be interesting to see if mine matches

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by aeduna View Post
                        I have a similar brickwall in that my last known paternal-tree ancestor claims to have born in Dover, Kent (or on one occasion, in Cambridge), but there's no documentary evidence that he was there. I was hoping that changing tack to looking at y-chr DNA might help, but I've got no matches at all, even at 12 markers. As his estimated dob varies over 4 years as well, I suspect he was fudging it either deliberately or inadvertantly...
                        I had a similar brick wall situation, that I just broke thru last week. My G-G-G-GF was born in England in 1820, but I couldn't trace his path before the 1850 US Census. A new index of parish registers from the UK (among other records) was recently added to FamilySearch. I found a baptism record with the exact same name and birthday in the index, but in a different part of England than we thought he was from. Based on his mother's unique name (the same one he gave as a middle name to my G-G-GM), and the occupation of his father being the same as his, I'm fairly confident I found him. And after a little further investigation, I found the baptism records of his siblings, then his father, aunts, and uncles. So I was able to extend that line two generations in a short time.

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                        • #13
                          Nathan, presumably this is not your paternal N1c1 ancestor who you tracked down in England, right?

                          (You and I have a GD of 15 on 37 markers...)

                          Originally posted by nathanm View Post
                          I had a similar brick wall situation, that I just broke thru last week. My G-G-G-GF was born in England in 1820, but I couldn't trace his path before the 1850 US Census. A new index of parish registers from the UK (among other records) was recently added to FamilySearch. I found a baptism record with the exact same name and birthday in the index, but in a different part of England than we thought he was from. Based on his mother's unique name (the same one he gave as a middle name to my G-G-GM), and the occupation of his father being the same as his, I'm fairly confident I found him. And after a little further investigation, I found the baptism records of his siblings, then his father, aunts, and uncles. So I was able to extend that line two generations in a short time.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by nathanm View Post
                            I had a similar brick wall situation, that I just broke thru last week. My G-G-G-GF was born in England in 1820, but I couldn't trace his path before the 1850 US Census. A new index of parish registers from the UK (among other records) was recently added to FamilySearch. I found a baptism record with the exact same name and birthday in the index, but in a different part of England than we thought he was from. Based on his mother's unique name (the same one he gave as a middle name to my G-G-GM), and the occupation of his father being the same as his, I'm fairly confident I found him. And after a little further investigation, I found the baptism records of his siblings, then his father, aunts, and uncles. So I was able to extend that line two generations in a short time.
                            No luck I'm afraid - I have his parents according to his wedding certificate, but I can't even find them. Doesn't help that its hard t make out if its Theacy or Treacey or ? for his mother's maiden name.. but there's no special names coming down through the ages or anything useful like that.

                            So I've got him moving from England around 1866 to Australia, but nothing further back and the closest Y-match is 20 generations to Belgium somewhere.

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                            • #15
                              According to multiple family histories written by different great grandsons of the original immigrant, our surname line came to the Virginia colony from England. So, assuming that origin is correct...

                              England
                              ca. 1684 => Henrico/Chesterfield Co. VA
                              ca. 1760 => Lunemberg Co VA
                              ca. 1785 => Charlotte Co VA
                              ca. 1795 => Oglethorpe Co. GA
                              ca. 1845 => Meriwether Co. GA
                              ca. 1882 => Upson Co. Ga
                              ca. 1890 => Crawford Co. GA
                              ca. 1925 => Colon, Panama
                              ca. 1948 => Southern California

                              From the earliest person I can trace from (the immigrant mentioned above) to me, not one generation has stayed in the county of their birth.
                              Last edited by smallaxe; 14 February 2011, 11:48 PM.

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