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  • Confirming another Test

    I recently had testing done by DNA tribes and below are the results (reporting the top 5)

    1. Native American (mixed) Minnesota USA) (.67)
    2. Native American (mixed) Minnesota USA) (.61)
    3. Udmurt (Russia federation) (.89)
    4 Native American (mixed) Minnesota USA) ( .57)
    5. Komi (Russia Federation) (.85)

    My family surname (Brunet) can be traced back to at least 1678 in Quebec.
    Mixed marriages were common and even encouraged so this not a far fetched
    I just expected the results to be European, not Eastern European.

    Now as far as I know DNAtribes tests XY from the nucleolus of the cell.

    I have ordered Y chromosome test from this site and another X (mitochondrial)
    In an attempt to either confirm or disconfirm the above test.
    However , based on my limited knowledge of genetics, I believe I can only confirm one half of the mixture above using my DNA. This is because my X (tested above) may not have come from my mothers line but from her fathers mother line. Is that correct.?

    So are my assumptions correct? That is I can only test for half that mixture with a Y and a X (mitochondria) DNA?
    Or to phrase the same question a different way , to confirm I would need a Y,X mitrochondria and a X nucleaic.

    What halogroups would I be looking for to confirm or disconfirm?

  • #2
    That should have read what haplotree groups should I be looking for.Sorry

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    • #3
      No response ? Anyone? Did I ask my question incorrectly ?

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      • #4
        I'm not familiar enough with the DNATribes test to comment specifically on that test, but I can clarify your understanding of the chromosomes and mitochondria, and what your tests from FTDNA might show:

        Originally posted by Brunetmj View Post
        I have ordered Y chromosome test from this site and another X (mitochondrial)
        ...
        This is because my X (tested above) may not have come from my mothers line but from her fathers mother line. Is that correct.?
        The X chromosome and mitochondria are not the same thing.

        Men have one Y chromosome (from the father) and one X chromosome (from the mother).
        Women have two X chromosomes (one from the father, one from the mother).
        Both men and women have mitochondria (always from the mother).

        The X that you inherited from your mother is a combination of her two X chromosomes, which she inherited from both her mother and father.

        It sounds like you ordered a Y chromosome and mitochondria (mtDNA) test from Family Tree DNA -- correct?

        The Y chromosome test will test you about your direct paternal line -- your father's father's father, etc.
        The mtDNA test will tell you about your direct maternal line -- your mother's mother's mother, etc.

        So if you have Native American ancestry on one of those lines, then you will get a haplogroup that is indicative of Native American ancestry. For Y-DNA, that would be haplogroup Q1a3a. For mtDNA, that would be haplogroups A, B, C, D or X.

        Hope this helps.

        Elise
        Last edited by efgen; 28 January 2011, 08:21 PM.

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        • #5
          The YDNA test will reveal the haplogroup of your father's father's father's father's line.

          The XY in DNATribes is autosomal. It is a collected assortment that you inherited from your father's father, and your father's mother, and your mother's father, and your mother's mother.

          The mitochondrial test will reveal the MTDNA (also written as mDNA and or mtDNA) of your mother's mother's mother's mother.

          There is another kind of DNA called XDNA or X chromosone. That has a unique inheritance pattern. Men inherit only one X and it is from their mom. Men inherit one Y and it is from their father. All men pass down one of these to their children. If you are a father, all your sons have the same Y you got from your father. All your daughters inherit your X that you got from your mom.
          The pattern is different for women. Women have no Y but they have two X's (female=XX). Women inherit one X from their father and one X from their mother. Every woman will pass one of her X's to her sons and daughters.

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          • #6
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            The XY in DNATribes is autosomal. It is a collected assortment that you inherited from your father's father, and your father's mother, and your mother's father, and your mother's mother.
            Thank You everyone , those answers are very helpful.
            I did not realize the X from autosomal DNA was that mixed. That would make it near impossible to test for validity unless my Y DNA (which I recently sent to this site for testing) or my mDNA validate it , or partially validate it.
            It could also show something entirely different. I should have come to this web site from the beginning.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Brunetmj View Post
              Now as far as I know DNAtribes tests XY from the nucleolus of the cell.
              I believe all of their markers are "autosomal" -- the non-sex chromosomes in the nucleus of the cell, numbered 1-22. You can tell which chromosome for many of them by looking at the number between D and S, e.g. D3S1358 is on chromosome 3. You'd need to look up the position of markers that don't follow the D_S pattern.

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              • #8
                Brunetmj,

                Do you have French Canadian (Quebec, Canada) in your DNATribes top 20?

                Do you have it in your Extended Report (if you bought that one too)?

                The extended report lists your scores for all 1,134 populations in their database.

                Mine is : French Canadian (Quebec, Canada) (0.34) 729.91

                And I looked up my scores to compare to your top 5.

                Udmurt (Russian Federation) (0.33) 115.04

                Native American (mixed) (Minnesota, U.S.A.) (0.15) 109.44

                Native American (mixed) (Minnesota, U.S.A.) (0.13) 94.33

                Komi (Russian Federation (0.26) 72.83

                Native American (mixed) (Minnesota, U.S.A.) (0.08) 45.70

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                • #9
                  Quebec was .32 ranked 90th.
                  A lot of information here and I thank everyone.
                  When I read this thread in it's entirety I think it's fair to say that DNAtribes
                  cannot be compared to Y testing or mDNA testing and perhaps not as useful for establishing family lines. To be fair to them they did advertise to produce a unique genetic profile. It is unique , it is just not useful.
                  I should have my Y DNA done in three weeks or so and I will post the results.
                  Thanks again

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                  • #10
                    You're welcome. If you want to you can join FTDNA YDNA Group Projects from your personal page. Search for "Acadian" and/or "Quebec" and any other one that fits with your known paternal line. You can create a new YDNA Group Project for your Brunet surname, if there isn't one already.

                    The DNA Tribes numbers in parentheses (0.32) are called TribeScores. It is important to also read the numbers after that. Those are your MLI (Match Liklihood Index). Your original report explains all of that in the first few pages, in case you missed it. For example, if your highest MLI score was 2,100.06 for Germany, that means your DNA blend is three times higher in Germany than a MLI of 700.02 for Italy.
                    But your blend can be found in both populations (Germany and Italy), so Italy can't be ruled out as a potential source of admixture.
                    Last edited by rainbow; 29 January 2011, 09:43 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Yes I have been exploring this site and found the areas that you mentioned. I am the first generation and English speaking born in the US. All my roots both paternal (Brunet) and maternal (Marion) are in Quebec and in Ontario so I will likely join in the Canadian areas. The town of Marionsville, outside of Ottawa,
                      is named after my grandfather (on my mothers side). My mother and 11 siblings were born there , in a house that still exists today.
                      So I will post my mDNA results also.

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                      • #12
                        I don't know if I have any Canadian ancestry but my Czechoslovakian Great Grandfather claimed to be Canadian when he applied for U.S. citizenship in the 1920s. He was in Ontario but I don't know why or how long he was there. He sailed to the US in 1906 (Bremen to New York) but the ship manifest was stamped "non-immigrant" going to meet his father, and the final destination didn't say Canada. It is odd because my Great Aunt told me years ago that her father was an orphan.
                        Last edited by rainbow; 30 January 2011, 01:37 PM.

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                        • #13
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                          It is odd because my Great Aunt told me years ago that her father was an orphan
                          I think in those days it was easier to immigrate. Likely it just involved making a few statements of connectivity to the states (i.e. going to visit his father) or even fudging his previous nationality. Facts no one was likely to check at a time were immigrants were more welcome.

                          This is what makes the results of my DNAtribes test so intriguing. How is it that Eastern European instead of European shows up? My surname is the 77th most common surname name in France. It's really like a Smith or Jones here. Was it a very early immigrant to Quebec to take a French name or a young orphan adopted by a French family?
                          Of course I shouldn't speculate to much until i get the results of my YDNA test back.
                          It is however true that our early ancestral roots are very interesting.

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                          • #14
                            My Great Aunt said he was orphaned in Austria-Hungary (Czechoslovakia). She said his mom died in childbirth and his father re-married and had more kids and abandoned him. And she said that when he came to the USA (as an adult) he lived in Manhattan, New York for many years before he moved to New Jersey. The only correct information she gave me about him is his marriage date and his children's birthdates. There is an 8+ year gap between when he got here in 1906 and when he married in NJ. The final destination listed on the 1906 ship manifest is a town with no state listed. I thought it was a mistake because I couldn't find it, but I've since found it is a small town in North Dakota. Ancestry.com has him crossing into Minnesota from Canada in that 8 year gap. In the 1920s he applied for US citizenship, first claiming to be from Canada, but final document has his birth town (in Slovakia), and it lists that he arrived in NY in 1906, and "last foreign residence" is a town name that I can only find in Norway.
                            Last edited by rainbow; 30 January 2011, 09:44 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Lots of Eastern Europeans moved to Canada to work on building the railroad(s).
                              I did find random records online of people in Ontario and the Midwest with the same surname of my paternal line.
                              Another odd thing is that he didn't know his birthdate but went by a made-up birthday while living in the USA. The birth town that my Great Grandfather claimed was his birth town can't find a record of his birth, but they do have one for a female baby, with the feminine version of his name.

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