Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Should Results be Posted Everywhere?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Should Results be Posted Everywhere?

    My FGS results have resulted in some interest in others with similar results. I have receieved requests to enter my results in GEDMATCH and GENBANK. Gedmatch.com seems to be a donated service run by one Curtis Rogers, who also accepts donations. Genbank.com seems to be no more than an ad portal and says its under construction. Then there's Gentree.com which seems to let you add a gedcom and DNA results to either search yourself or hire a consultant to search the database for you.

    These apparently aren't affiliated with the Genographic Project, Mitosearch or NCBI Genbank or FTDNA for that matter.

    I recall reading somewhere on FTDNA's site that one should be wary of where one placed their genetic data for privacy reasons. Does that caution still apply or is that only for YDNA? Would anyone like to share their experiences/opinions of these services: GEDMATCH.com, GENTREE.COM or the NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov - Genbank

  • #2
    I submitted my FGS to the NCBI GenBank. That is the only real GenBank.
    I used an Ian Logan link to do that.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by whisper View Post
      I recall reading somewhere on FTDNA's site that one should be wary of where one placed their genetic data for privacy reasons. Does that caution still apply or is that only for YDNA? Would anyone like to share their experiences/opinions of these services: GEDMATCH.com, GENTREE.COM or the NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov - Genbank
      My take could be a little biased, since I'm working on another system to add to the mix (something to help my adopted wife and anyone else who participates).

      There are two areas you need to think about. First, what are your goals. If you had a question that you answered, then there isn't any compelling reason for you to post the information. If you have a lot of questions that need answers, then I would think posting your information to the wind could assist in finding answers.

      The second area to think about is related to privacy. What are the privacy concerns; now and in the future?

      I am not a prophet, but I do understand technology and social concerns related to privacy. You have to break down the concerns into a couple groups.

      1) Classification information about your ancestry, such as my wife being H5 for mtDNA.
      2) Specific raw information that defines specific health and background information.

      Items in the first category could impact my wife only if social bias were to build around racial concerns. This doesn't seem to be likely, but possible.

      Items in the second category could become problematic, if insurance companies were to illegally use the information in a way to raise your rates due to finding something they consider to be a risk.

      You have to assume that the information will become more concentrated in the future. One day I may be able to Google "What is Bob Smith" and get genetic information. Will this affect Bob Smith? If I'm a racist employer, maybe. If I'm an insurance company.. maybe. Could Bob sue me, yes.

      Beyond that, I would assume it wouldn't go future than what already happens when people make choices based on hair and eye color.

      A totally different subject is related to financial implications. Knowing your genetic information is not likely to allow me to steal your money, but you could potentially be paying money for testing and someone else could profit from the information without rewarding you. That will happen with just about anything, so you need to decide if you are willing to "contribute to the common good" if you feel there is one.

      This was all off the top of my head, and may not make too much sense.. but it is something I've been thinking about.

      Comment


      • #4
        My mtDNA: Happy To Be Over The Hill

        GenBank can just put Greenspan's name on it, if you want, to protect your identity. You actually must request they add your name if you want that. I had no female offspring. Only a few of my cousins did.

        At 60 years old, I have already presented with all the genetic diseases that I will, except Altzheimer's, which my grandmother, mother, and aunts had. I suspect My uncles did as well. They all died in their 80s. My insurance company already has all those things in my history.

        I have Type II Diabetes. Most claim it is not a mtDNA function, but the research of the disease seems to contradict the research on the phylogeny at the molecular level.

        I am open about my genetics. I spread my details about my markers and polymorphisms far and wide. However, GenBank is the best option for research and comparison if privacy/security is a concern. This is my GenBank sequence:
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/JN020360


        Originally posted by JamesKelley View Post
        My take could be a little biased, since I'm working on another system to add to the mix (something to help my adopted wife and anyone else who participates).

        There are two areas you need to think about. First, what are your goals. If you had a question that you answered, then there isn't any compelling reason for you to post the information. If you have a lot of questions that need answers, then I would think posting your information to the wind could assist in finding answers.

        The second area to think about is related to privacy. What are the privacy concerns; now and in the future?

        I am not a prophet, but I do understand technology and social concerns related to privacy. You have to break down the concerns into a couple groups.

        1) Classification information about your ancestry, such as my wife being H5 for mtDNA.
        2) Specific raw information that defines specific health and background information.

        Items in the first category could impact my wife only if social bias were to build around racial concerns. This doesn't seem to be likely, but possible.

        Items in the second category could become problematic, if insurance companies were to illegally use the information in a way to raise your rates due to finding something they consider to be a risk.

        You have to assume that the information will become more concentrated in the future. One day I may be able to Google "What is Bob Smith" and get genetic information. Will this affect Bob Smith? If I'm a racist employer, maybe. If I'm an insurance company.. maybe. Could Bob sue me, yes.

        Beyond that, I would assume it wouldn't go future than what already happens when people make choices based on hair and eye color.

        A totally different subject is related to financial implications. Knowing your genetic information is not likely to allow me to steal your money, but you could potentially be paying money for testing and someone else could profit from the information without rewarding you. That will happen with just about anything, so you need to decide if you are willing to "contribute to the common good" if you feel there is one.

        This was all off the top of my head, and may not make too much sense.. but it is something I've been thinking about.
        Last edited by JohnLloydScharf; 8th June 2011, 11:36 AM.

        Comment

        Working...
        X