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  • #61
    something to look foward too

    bennett told me last year he would have a good e3b test some time this year
    so i emailed him again and he said in the comming months
    in fact the quote is


    Within the next few months, or sooner.

    something to look foward too

    Comment


    • #62
      Jim,

      When the new E3b test is available, will those who have already paid for the previous test, get the new test free? automatically? i.e. I have already been tested positive for M35, will I get clarification as to my sub-clade?

      Jeff Stewart

      Comment


      • #63
        Originally posted by jaken24
        Jim,

        When the new E3b test is available, will those who have already paid for the previous test, get the new test free? automatically? i.e. I have already been tested positive for M35, will I get clarification as to my sub-clade?

        Jeff Stewart

        Jeff as much as i would of like to be the guys who risked all and formed the company i am not.
        so i dont get to make company policy like i would love to. thats for bennett to tell you.i dont know what the new test will do more then the old.

        Comment


        • #64
          some people think i work for ftdna i dont lol
          i am mixed dominant [au contraire] like don quiote if i see a windmill look out

          Comment


          • #65
            Hi all,
            I recently got back my 12 marker results and was surprised to find that they show that I'm E3b. With variations of my surname (Scism, Schism, Sissom, Sissam, Sisson) occurring almost exclusively in the English Midlands and central Scotland, I had predicted R1b. Nevertheless, if it shows I'm E3b, then "Woo-hoo! Go Club E3b!"

            I understand that E3b makes up a smaller percentage than other European haplogroups but that it's still broken down into different variants, which leads to my question (long-winded, I know). How does one tell which sub-group of this haplogroup they belong in?

            My results are as follows:
            13, 24, 13, 10, 16, 18, 11, 12, 12, 13, 11, 30

            Now, I've gotten some confusing information on this, with some sources stating this is E3b1 alpha cluster, and others putting it into E3b2. My understanding is that E3b1 alpha is the Balkans/Neolithic Farmer variant and E3b2 is Berber. But, which is it? I'm assuming that it's E3b1 alpha seeing how, at 12/12 I have the largest concentration of matches starting in Romania and then spiking considerably in Germany, England and Sweden. The rest of the matches drop down to 1 match per country. At the one and two step mutation mark, the numbers are multiplied, but still reflect the same spikes (28/49 matches for Germany and the U.K. respectively). Curiously, matches for other countries stay low. Somewhere between 1 and 4.

            I can understand how this would be the case if it were E3b1 alpha, but not E3b2 (being Berber/Iberian). If possible, can somebody please explain this more to me and perhaps clue me in on which group of E3b I belong to?

            Thanks,

            Jeff Scism

            Comment


            • #66
              E3b haplotypes and subclades

              Hi Jeff,

              Welcome. You're right that E3b branches out into several subclades.

              Considering your geographical location, your ancestry and what it is known from current population studies, the odds are that your haplotype is indeed of the alpha cluster of E3b1. However, the definitive answer can only be found by further testing of SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms).

              One thing about the number of matches that you have to consider is that not all regions of the world have participants in similar proportions, so it is to be expected that you'll have a higher number of matches in places with a higher number of dna testees.

              Check this project and compare your haplotype:
              http://www.familytreedna.com/public/freemanDNAProject/

              Regards,
              Victor


              Originally posted by slumbuzzle
              Hi all,
              I recently got back my 12 marker results and was surprised to find that they show that I'm E3b. With variations of my surname (Scism, Schism, Sissom, Sissam, Sisson) occurring almost exclusively in the English Midlands and central Scotland, I had predicted R1b. Nevertheless, if it shows I'm E3b, then "Woo-hoo! Go Club E3b!"

              I understand that E3b makes up a smaller percentage than other European haplogroups but that it's still broken down into different variants, which leads to my question (long-winded, I know). How does one tell which sub-group of this haplogroup they belong in?

              My results are as follows:
              13, 24, 13, 10, 16, 18, 11, 12, 12, 13, 11, 30

              Now, I've gotten some confusing information on this, with some sources stating this is E3b1 alpha cluster, and others putting it into E3b2. My understanding is that E3b1 alpha is the Balkans/Neolithic Farmer variant and E3b2 is Berber. But, which is it? I'm assuming that it's E3b1 alpha seeing how, at 12/12 I have the largest concentration of matches starting in Romania and then spiking considerably in Germany, England and Sweden. The rest of the matches drop down to 1 match per country. At the one and two step mutation mark, the numbers are multiplied, but still reflect the same spikes (28/49 matches for Germany and the U.K. respectively). Curiously, matches for other countries stay low. Somewhere between 1 and 4.

              I can understand how this would be the case if it were E3b1 alpha, but not E3b2 (being Berber/Iberian). If possible, can somebody please explain this more to me and perhaps clue me in on which group of E3b I belong to?

              Thanks,

              Jeff Scism

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by slumbuzzle
                Hi all,
                I recently got back my 12 marker results and was surprised to find that they show that I'm E3b. With variations of my surname (Scism, Schism, Sissom, Sissam, Sisson) occurring almost exclusively in the English Midlands and central Scotland, I had predicted R1b. Nevertheless, if it shows I'm E3b, then "Woo-hoo! Go Club E3b!"

                I understand that E3b makes up a smaller percentage than other European haplogroups but that it's still broken down into different variants, which leads to my question (long-winded, I know). How does one tell which sub-group of this haplogroup they belong in?

                My results are as follows:
                13, 24, 13, 10, 16, 18, 11, 12, 12, 13, 11, 30

                Now, I've gotten some confusing information on this, with some sources stating this is E3b1 alpha cluster, and others putting it into E3b2. My understanding is that E3b1 alpha is the Balkans/Neolithic Farmer variant and E3b2 is Berber. But, which is it? I'm assuming that it's E3b1 alpha seeing how, at 12/12 I have the largest concentration of matches starting in Romania and then spiking considerably in Germany, England and Sweden. The rest of the matches drop down to 1 match per country. At the one and two step mutation mark, the numbers are multiplied, but still reflect the same spikes (28/49 matches for Germany and the U.K. respectively). Curiously, matches for other countries stay low. Somewhere between 1 and 4.

                I can understand how this would be the case if it were E3b1 alpha, but not E3b2 (being Berber/Iberian). If possible, can somebody please explain this more to me and perhaps clue me in on which group of E3b I belong to?

                Thanks,

                Jeff Scism

                jeff we match 12/12 hope you upgrade
                you are alpha cluster i am an irishman e3b1. but the real story doesnt necessaraly lie 30,000 years ago. migrations from the samer areas have happened all the time, here is what i did. i saw half my matches were askenaszi which meant something but then my 25 matches started comeing in and they had a history [family] of jewish forced conversion.i take that as important .
                who you match is part of the story these details come with matches and time. we need as many people to test as possible . its like doing a 1000 peice puzzle and 15 peices come in an envelope every week. lol your by the box waiting for the mailman

                my story might not be yours as you upgrade heck maybe my story falls apart and another comes into view . but thats the way it is

                Comment


                • #68
                  Which subclade?

                  Hi Victor and Jim,

                  I'm waiting for markers 13-37, but I was wondering if my subclade might be obvious from thew first 12 markers:

                  13 24 13 11 16 18 11 12 12 13 11 31

                  Any thoughts? I would love to read further on the specifics of our haplogroup. Any great links or article references?

                  Many thanks!
                  Jeff

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by JeffreyRopp
                    Hi Victor and Jim,

                    I'm waiting for markers 13-37, but I was wondering if my subclade might be obvious from thew first 12 markers:

                    13 24 13 11 16 18 11 12 12 13 11 31

                    Any thoughts? I would love to read further on the specifics of our haplogroup. Any great links or article references?

                    Many thanks!
                    Jeff
                    you
                    13 24 13 11 16 18 11 12 12 13 11 31
                    me
                    13 24 13 10 16 18 11 12 12 13 11 30

                    so if you do ysearch and get denning ardagh the 37 is me the 25 my son

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Hello Jeff,

                      My guess is your subclade is E3b1. Have you checked the links below?
                      http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb....g/YCC_E3b.html
                      http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb..../haplo_e3b.htm

                      Also, have you entered you haplotype in the Ysearch database (www.ysearch.org) ?

                      Victor.

                      Originally posted by JeffreyRopp
                      Hi Victor and Jim,

                      I'm waiting for markers 13-37, but I was wondering if my subclade might be obvious from thew first 12 markers:

                      13 24 13 11 16 18 11 12 12 13 11 31

                      Any thoughts? I would love to read further on the specifics of our haplogroup. Any great links or article references?

                      Many thanks!
                      Jeff

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Sorry all as to the lateness of my reply. Work and World of Warcraft sucked me in over the weekend .

                        Hi Victor,

                        Thanks for the information. I ordered the SNP test as soon as I got the test results in, so I suppose we’ll have to wait for the results of that one to come in. In regards to the number of matches, I understand that they are skewed depending on number of participants, however, when used as a general overview of migration, I think they can be helpful.

                        Considering your geographical location, your ancestry and what it is known from current population studies, the odds are that your haplotype is indeed of the alpha cluster of E3b1.
                        Do you know where I can take a look at these population studies? I know the relative percentages of the different haplogroups in various countries. I have also seen a map that traces the migration of E3b in Europe along the same route that haplogroup I took. Curiously, I splits and takes a sharp turn toward Germany and Scandinavia. If both groups left the Balkans at the same time and perhaps intermingled, this would explain why a good number of my matches are in Germany and Sweden. Beyond these, I don’t have any information.

                        Check this project and compare your haplotype:
                        I compared my haplotype here and found that I matched pretty evenly with people of surnames like Lancaster, Darsey, Spector and Dickason. I’m not sure if that helps much, but I plan on joining the E3b project anyway.


                        Hi Jim,

                        I plan to upgrade to the highest resolution possible as soon as finances permit, so we’ll see if we are indeed related (recently anyway) .

                        I agree what happened 30,000 years ago isn’t all that’s important. While I’m mainly interested in tracing my family within the last 2,000 years, I feel, since they are the reason I’m here today, I owe it to my ancestors to know who they were as far back as I can.

                        When I saw that there were some Ashkenazi matches in my results, I thought it was a little unusual as well, but then I read that the proportion of Ashkenazi in the database far outnumbered those in the general public. That coupled with the fact that only 10% or less of my matches were Ashkenazi, and it seems unlikely to me that I come from that background. I’m assuming that when I upgrade to more markers that the number of any matches will decrease in that higher resolution equals fewer but tighter matches.

                        It’s like doing a 1000 peice puzzle and 15 peices come in an envelope every week. lol your by the box waiting for the mailman.
                        lol, I know what you mean. I want it all right now! I find that, at the moment, I’m able to learn just enough to be dangerous but not helpful.

                        Slainte (or perhaps Mozel Tov),
                        Jeff Scism

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by slumbuzzle
                          Do you know where I can take a look at these population studies? I know the relative percentages of the different haplogroups in various countries. I have also seen a map that traces the migration of E3b in Europe along the same route that haplogroup I took. Curiously, I splits and takes a sharp turn toward Germany and Scandinavia. If both groups left the Balkans at the same time and perhaps intermingled, this would explain why a good number of my matches are in Germany and Sweden. Beyond these, I don’t have any information.
                          Jeff, here are a couple of interesting studies.
                          http://www.ucl.ac.uk/tcga/tcgapdf/capelli-CB-03.pdf
                          http://www.ucl.ac.uk/tcga/tcgapdf/Weale-MBE-02-AS.pdf

                          Also visit the following sites that I had previously posted and click on every link for some of the main studies on E3b.
                          http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb...hg/YCC_E3b.html
                          http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb...l/haplo_e3b.htm

                          I compared my haplotype here and found that I matched pretty evenly with people of surnames like Lancaster, Darsey, Spector and Dickason. I’m not sure if that helps much, but I plan on joining the E3b project anyway.
                          Take a look at a couple of cladograms made for the E3b project. The Id labels of each branch correspond to the haplotype's kit number. Note that these are just preliminary studies made with some readily available software tools which infer phylogeny based on genetic distance.

                          http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-...3/25_Panel.jpg
                          http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-...25_Panel_X.jpg

                          The goal is to finetune the procedure hoping that haplotypes will reveal subclade clustering. As you can notice in the cladograms, with the exception of a couple of isolated haplotypes, there appear to be two distinct clusters which could be correlated to the two main subclades. The answer to that will eventually arrive when enough participants have been "snipped" beyond M35.

                          Victor

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Jim Denning
                            Jeff as much as i would of like to be the guys who risked all and formed the company i am not.
                            so i dont get to make company policy like i would love to. thats for bennett to tell you.i dont know what the new test will do more then the old.


                            at the conference they said they have new equiptment to do more resolution reading of snps and have been discovering new ways of find more defineing technology to see clearer the picture of what e3b is where its been and what it did
                            ftdna is constantly doing upgrades you should be expecting very good things in the near future

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Hi all-

                              My paternal line can be dated to Germany in the 1700s. FTDNA has "predicted" me as E3b1 and is going to refine the test to confirm. These are the results:

                              DYS 393:13
                              DYS390:25
                              DYS19:14
                              DYS391:10
                              DYS385a:19
                              DYS385b: 23
                              DYS426:11
                              DYS388:12
                              DYS439:11
                              DYS389-1:13
                              DYS392:11
                              DYS389-2: 30
                              DYS458:15
                              DYS459a:9
                              DYS459b:9
                              DYS455:11
                              DYS454:11
                              DYS447:25
                              DYS437:14
                              DYS448:22
                              DYS449:35
                              DYS464a:15
                              DYS464b:16
                              DYS464c:16
                              DYS464d:17
                              DYS460:11
                              GATA H4: 11
                              YCA II a: 19
                              YCA II b: 22
                              DYS456: 15
                              DYS607: 12
                              DYS576: 17
                              DYS570: 20
                              CDY a: 34
                              CDY b: 37
                              DYS442: 11
                              DYS438: 10

                              Now this is an exact match with the E3b Haplotype # 4 that is described in this link.

                              E3b Haplotype # 4
                              The partial haplotype is widespread, particularly in Central and Eastern Europe. Its arrival in Britain could have come from any source, including Danish or Anglo-Saxon migration.
                              I'm not sure how this Haplotype #4 relates to the alpha through delta subclades described in this link and in the Cruciani publication. I'm also not sure how either of those groupings relate to the groupings that are referred to in apparently different nomenclature here:

                              E3b can be divided into three subclades E-M78, E-M81 and E-M34 as well as the paragroup E-M34*.
                              Is there a document that can tie this all together?

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                E3b Phylogenetic Tree Update

                                Hi JLK and all E3b fellows,

                                Regarding your question, unfortunately there is not a single document that ties everything related to E3b haplogroup but progress is being done.

                                I just updated the phylogenetic diagram for the E3b project and inserted your haplotype in the list. Take a look to see where you fit. (Look for your kit number).

                                http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-...e3b_full25.jpg

                                This tree was created with the PHYLIP software package which infers phylogeny based on a distance matrix and then drawn with TreeView. The records include all with at least 25 markers in the E3b project.

                                http://www.familytreedna.com/public/freemanDNAProject/

                                Victor

                                Comment

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