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yDNA and mtDNA haplogroup names

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  • yDNA and mtDNA haplogroup names

    is there any relationship between the yDNA haplogroup names and the mtDNA haplogroup names? i see there are N's, I's and J's on both sides, maybe others. I'm assuming these are just two different sets of arbitrary nomenclature - is that true? or is there anything shared between them? thanks.

  • #2
    institutes code(s)

    Hi
    If you read some of the information here it may help
    http://www.isogg.org/

    Additionally check out the "dna newbie" info, they maybe able to answer the question much better than I.

    another site toi view more info is snpedia
    http://www.snpedia.com/index.php/SNPedia

    I do recall reading somewhere, the haplogroup designation such as R, H, I, L etc were a letter used to designate which authorized research Institute/University discovered it (code marker(s)) then it was coded. For example hypotheretically, if Professor at University of AZ, the overseeing reglatory org gave it the code "Z" .
    Some what similar, to when an sky watcher discovers new object, they have the option of naming it, yet, in this instance, the org. simplified the coding credit process.
    As best as I understand, what I read in late July 2010 online.
    Some one else may be able to better explain it, perhaps?

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    • #3
      As explained in the other links, there is no relations between Y names and mtdna names.

      Mtdna letter names more or less follow the order in which haplogroups were found and studied in the scientific literature. For instance, the first 4 (A,B,C,D) are the ones found in American Indians because the mtdna of this population was the first one to be studied. This is also why things are so confused. The tree wasn't clear when the haplogroups were named, so in the end the positions are pretty much random. So for instance U and H are "daughters" of R, which is in turn a daughter of N, and I is a sister of N1a, etc etc.

      Instead, the names of Y haplogroup were given after the overall tree was known, so they follow a basic logic. A is the earliest branch, followed by B. All letters after F are sons of F and all letters after K in turn are sons of F.

      By the way, the lab letter refers to the name of the mutation defining a haplogroup, not the name of the haplogroup. So for instance mutation M20 was found by lab M (whatever that is), but it defines Y-haplogroup L.

      cacio

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by cacio View Post
        By the way, the lab letter refers to the name of the mutation defining a haplogroup, not the name of the haplogroup. So for instance mutation M20 was found by lab M (whatever that is), but it defines Y-haplogroup L.
        According to ISOGG, the alphabetic prefix of SNPs denoting the discoverer(s) are as follows:

        IMS-JST = Institute of Medical Science-Japan Science and Technology Agency
        L = Thomas Krahn, MSC (Dipl. Ing.) of Family Tree DNA's Genomics Research Center; snps named in honor of the late Leo Little
        M = Peter Underhill, Ph.D. of Stanford University
        N = The Laboratory of Bioinformatics, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing
        P = Michael Hammer, Ph.D. of University of Arizona
        Page = David C. Page, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research
        PK = Biomedical and Genetic Engineering Laboratories, Islamabad, Pakistan
        S = James F. Wilson, D.Phil. at Edinburgh University
        U = Lynn M. Sims, University of Central Florida; Dennis Garvey, Ph.D. Gonzaga University; and Jack Ballantyne, Ph.D., University of Central Florida
        V = Rosaria Scozzari and Fulvio Cruciani, Universit

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        • #5
          Cacio - thanks - that's very clear.

          Originally posted by cacio View Post
          As explained in the other links, there is no relations between Y names and mtdna names.

          Mtdna letter names more or less follow the order in which haplogroups were found and studied in the scientific literature. For instance, the first 4 (A,B,C,D) are the ones found in American Indians because the mtdna of this population was the first one to be studied. This is also why things are so confused. The tree wasn't clear when the haplogroups were named, so in the end the positions are pretty much random. So for instance U and H are "daughters" of R, which is in turn a daughter of N, and I is a sister of N1a, etc etc.

          Instead, the names of Y haplogroup were given after the overall tree was known, so they follow a basic logic. A is the earliest branch, followed by B. All letters after F are sons of F and all letters after K in turn are sons of F.

          By the way, the lab letter refers to the name of the mutation defining a haplogroup, not the name of the haplogroup. So for instance mutation M20 was found by lab M (whatever that is), but it defines Y-haplogroup L.

          cacio

          Comment

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