Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I need to know if my maternal grandmother was biologically related to her father.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • rucksack
    replied
    Hando,

    Didn't you at least notice that this "information" was from 2003?

    I really hesitate to call it information.

    Do more reading. Check with the thousands of folks that have already had successes.

    Don't read and rely on old garbage.

    Since the day that was written, many many thousand more people have undergone DNA testing.

    We still have a long way to go, but far too many people have already had proven DNA track records vs. traditional genealogy and have had it come out perfect.

    Also, the Family Finder test has absolutely nothing to do with mtDNA.
    Last edited by rucksack; 27 August 2010, 02:18 AM. Reason: posting cut off

    Leave a comment:


  • Hando
    replied
    Thanks everyone, but I just read this following article by Rebeca Skloot and wondered if it would negatively impact my search results?
    I just bought the Famly Finder Test to test my mother and her male cousin maternal side) to see if they are truly related. Having read the below article, I wonder if the test will be able to show whether they are related or not.
    http://www.popsci.com/scitech/articl...nealogy?page=4

    Rebecca Sloot writes "When pressed, Greenspan concedes that mitochondrial DNA isn't much use for traditional genealogy. "It's projecting back to a group that may have formed 20,000 to 30,000 years ago," he told me. "So that's more of an anthropology test." As for its use in genealogy research: If two women came to him saying, Are we related? he could give them an answer with traditional DNA mapping techniques. "Other than that," he said, "if you're looking to find your family through a female DNA test, you may as well be playing the lottery."

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Barrett
    replied
    Originally posted by Hando View Post
    Thanks, but if Family finder "won't tell you who that ancestor was or the relationship to that person" what would you recommend as a better indicator for being cousins? Ie between my mother (or her brother) and their maternal cousin. Ultimately, this will indicate whether my maternal grandmother is the biological daughter of my maternal great grandfather. Thanks
    Family Finder may be your best bet. You just need to understand what it can and what it can't tell you.

    Leave a comment:


  • MMaddi
    replied
    Originally posted by Hando View Post
    Thank you all very much I really appreciate it.
    My next question is this...
    If I was able to test my mother and her maternal male cousin (The son of the oldest brother of my maternal grandmother) and establish that my mother and her maternal male cousin are in fact cousins, then I think I would be satisfied. Because, wouldn't this most likely mean that my maternal grandmother was in fact the bioligical daughter of her father? Since my maternal grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers, if my mother and her male maternal cousin were proven to be cousins, wouldn't it most likely mean that they shared common ancestry? Meaning that my maternal grandmother and her oldest brother were biological children of their father?

    If this is the case then would Family finder be the test best equipped for my research? And if so, what are the chances for success/failure.
    I am new to all this and so I really do appreciate all your patience and advice.
    Thank you
    Yes, as long as your maternal grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers, the Family Finder test would be able to tell if they shared the same father. As I posted previously, Family Finder can clearly distinguish between first cousins (your mother and a son of your grandmother's brother) and unrelated people.

    Unrelated people will not share any significant segments of DNA. First cousins will have shared segments representing about 12.5% of the total DNA. At the level of first cousins, the chances of missing a first cousin relationship is virtually nil - there's just too much shared DNA from the grandparent(s) to miss the relationship.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hando
    replied
    Thank you all very much I really appreciate it.
    My next question is this...
    If I was able to test my mother and her maternal male cousin (The son of the oldest brother of my maternal grandmother) and establish that my mother and her maternal male cousin are in fact cousins, then I think I would be satisfied. Because, wouldn't this most likely mean that my maternal grandmother was in fact the bioligical daughter of her father? Since my maternal grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers, if my mother and her male maternal cousin were proven to be cousins, wouldn't it most likely mean that they shared common ancestry? Meaning that my maternal grandmother and her oldest brother were biological children of their father?

    If this is the case then would Family finder be the test best equipped for my research? And if so, what are the chances for success/failure.
    I am new to all this and so I really do appreciate all your patience and advice.
    Thank you

    Leave a comment:


  • zarlor
    replied
    Originally posted by GayeSherman View Post
    I believe the problem is that the grandmother and all her brothers are deceased. Testing mother (grandma's daughter) would show grandma's mtDNA but the mtDNA of the brothers would not pass to their sons (the cousins who are testing candidates).
    Oh, you're right. I misread that part.

    Leave a comment:


  • GayeSherman
    replied
    Originally posted by zarlor View Post
    Well, an mtDNA test by your mother and her Uncles should suggest if the maternal line is intact or not, showing if your maternal grandmother and her brothers (whichever ones you can get to test at least) all likely had the same mother or not.
    I believe the problem is that the grandmother and all her brothers are deceased. Testing mother (grandma's daughter) would show grandma's mtDNA but the mtDNA of the brothers would not pass to their sons (the cousins who are testing candidates).

    Leave a comment:


  • zarlor
    replied
    Originally posted by Hando View Post
    Incidentally, as I mentioned, my grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers. This oldest brother's son was recently hospitalized for a stroke attack, so my time is short.
    Well, an mtDNA test by your mother and her Uncles should suggest if the maternal line is intact or not, showing if your maternal grandmother and her brothers (whichever ones you can get to test at least) all likely had the same mother or not.

    FF will help determine general relationship (being 1st cousins) and, with enough information MIGHT be useful for narrowing down at least part of the genetic line, but I'm not sure there are any guarantees there for making sure if one one of the parents is not biological but the other is and you may need the assistance of someone who can better help you working through the Chromosome Browser for that.

    A Y-chromosome test would be useful only in determining the possible general heritage of your great-uncles' father, doing so on your Uncle would only tell you that for your maternal grandfather. Which may or may not be useful to you in making connections up those particular paternal lines.

    I think that's about all you can get from them for now, but I do think getting samples in to FTDNA would probably be worthwhile since they will store it giving you the chance to do more in-depth testing later. You could always offer to, for example, buy a cheaper test for them now and keep your contact info on their account, if they agree to that, and you could then get a more in-depth test later when yo can afford it or if some new testing method that is more useful pops up later, I would think.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ann Turner
    replied
    Originally posted by Hando View Post
    Incidentally, as I mentioned, my grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers. This oldest brother's son was recently hospitalized for a stroke attack, so my time is short.
    Family Finder can't be relied on to distinguish between full and half relationships (beyond the sibling level), so it would be essential to test the oldest brother's son -- or his children. His children will retain enough DNA to match your mother if they share the common ancestor.

    This does assume that there is no related male (brothers or cousins) who could have been your grandmother's father.

    Leave a comment:


  • GayeSherman
    replied
    Mothers and Fathers

    Originally posted by Hando View Post
    I had no idea that sharing or not sharing the same mother would make a difference. Now I'm even more confused about what test if at all can help me find my answer.
    Y DNA is a good way to rule out paternity but it only works for male descendants. FF uses all lines. If you can't be sure whether your mother and her cousins had or didn't have the same grandmother, you're not going to be able to determine whether a close/immediate match is because the testees share a grandmother or a grandfather or both.

    Since the cousins are male, you can't even try a workaround using X chromosomes.

    Leave a comment:


  • darroll
    replied
    How old are you?, Hando.
    I would use you age, not some speculation before writing a will.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hando
    replied
    Originally posted by Hando View Post
    That's a good point. My grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers. I'm not sure if she shared the same mother as her 2nd and 3rd brothers. But I do know that her first brother and her had different mothers. As for her being the biological daughter or adopted by her father, I had no idea that sharing or not sharing the same mother would make a difference. Now I'm even more confused about what test if at all can help me find my answer.
    Incidentally, as I mentioned, my grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers. This oldest brother's son was recently hospitalized for a stroke attack, so my time is short.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hando
    replied
    Originally posted by GayeSherman View Post
    Do your maternal grandmother and her brothers have the same mother? In other words, do you suspect that your grandmother was adopted by BOTH her parents or only by her (presumably step)father?

    If they all had the same MOTHER, you might not get a definitive result from FF, even if all parties agreed to DNA testing.
    That's a good point. My grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers. I'm not sure if she shared the same mother as her 2nd and 3rd brothers. But I do know that her first brother and her had different mothers. As for her being the biological daughter or adopted by her father, I had no idea that sharing or not sharing the same mother would make a difference. Now I'm even more confused about what test if at all can help me find my answer.
    Last edited by Hando; 20 August 2010, 10:08 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • GayeSherman
    replied
    Another wrinkle

    Do your maternal grandmother and her brothers have the same mother? In other words, do you suspect that your grandmother was adopted by BOTH her parents or only by her (presumably step)father?

    If they all had the same MOTHER, you might not get a definitive result from FF, even if all parties agreed to DNA testing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hando
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim Barrett View Post
    1) Tell them the truth!!! A sample collected any other way is subject to contamination and the results isn't worth the paper it is written on. If they don't want to help have the courtesy to respect their wishes.

    2) Family Finder can tell you if there is a recent common ancestor but it won't tell you who that ancestor was or the relationship to that person. It is possible it might find one you didn't expect.
    Thanks, but if Family finder "won't tell you who that ancestor was or the relationship to that person" what would you recommend as a better indicator for being cousins? Ie between my mother (or her brother) and their maternal cousin. Ultimately, this will indicate whether my maternal grandmother is the biological daughter of my maternal great grandfather.
    Thanks

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X