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I need to know if my maternal grandmother was biologically related to her father.

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  • #16
    Thank you all very much I really appreciate it.
    My next question is this...
    If I was able to test my mother and her maternal male cousin (The son of the oldest brother of my maternal grandmother) and establish that my mother and her maternal male cousin are in fact cousins, then I think I would be satisfied. Because, wouldn't this most likely mean that my maternal grandmother was in fact the bioligical daughter of her father? Since my maternal grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers, if my mother and her male maternal cousin were proven to be cousins, wouldn't it most likely mean that they shared common ancestry? Meaning that my maternal grandmother and her oldest brother were biological children of their father?

    If this is the case then would Family finder be the test best equipped for my research? And if so, what are the chances for success/failure.
    I am new to all this and so I really do appreciate all your patience and advice.
    Thank you

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Hando View Post
      Thank you all very much I really appreciate it.
      My next question is this...
      If I was able to test my mother and her maternal male cousin (The son of the oldest brother of my maternal grandmother) and establish that my mother and her maternal male cousin are in fact cousins, then I think I would be satisfied. Because, wouldn't this most likely mean that my maternal grandmother was in fact the bioligical daughter of her father? Since my maternal grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers, if my mother and her male maternal cousin were proven to be cousins, wouldn't it most likely mean that they shared common ancestry? Meaning that my maternal grandmother and her oldest brother were biological children of their father?

      If this is the case then would Family finder be the test best equipped for my research? And if so, what are the chances for success/failure.
      I am new to all this and so I really do appreciate all your patience and advice.
      Thank you
      Yes, as long as your maternal grandmother and her oldest brother had different mothers, the Family Finder test would be able to tell if they shared the same father. As I posted previously, Family Finder can clearly distinguish between first cousins (your mother and a son of your grandmother's brother) and unrelated people.

      Unrelated people will not share any significant segments of DNA. First cousins will have shared segments representing about 12.5% of the total DNA. At the level of first cousins, the chances of missing a first cousin relationship is virtually nil - there's just too much shared DNA from the grandparent(s) to miss the relationship.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Hando View Post
        Thanks, but if Family finder "won't tell you who that ancestor was or the relationship to that person" what would you recommend as a better indicator for being cousins? Ie between my mother (or her brother) and their maternal cousin. Ultimately, this will indicate whether my maternal grandmother is the biological daughter of my maternal great grandfather. Thanks
        Family Finder may be your best bet. You just need to understand what it can and what it can't tell you.

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        • #19
          Thanks everyone, but I just read this following article by Rebeca Skloot and wondered if it would negatively impact my search results?
          I just bought the Famly Finder Test to test my mother and her male cousin maternal side) to see if they are truly related. Having read the below article, I wonder if the test will be able to show whether they are related or not.
          http://www.popsci.com/scitech/articl...nealogy?page=4

          Rebecca Sloot writes "When pressed, Greenspan concedes that mitochondrial DNA isn't much use for traditional genealogy. "It's projecting back to a group that may have formed 20,000 to 30,000 years ago," he told me. "So that's more of an anthropology test." As for its use in genealogy research: If two women came to him saying, Are we related? he could give them an answer with traditional DNA mapping techniques. "Other than that," he said, "if you're looking to find your family through a female DNA test, you may as well be playing the lottery."

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          • #20
            Hando,

            Didn't you at least notice that this "information" was from 2003?

            I really hesitate to call it information.

            Do more reading. Check with the thousands of folks that have already had successes.

            Don't read and rely on old garbage.

            Since the day that was written, many many thousand more people have undergone DNA testing.

            We still have a long way to go, but far too many people have already had proven DNA track records vs. traditional genealogy and have had it come out perfect.

            Also, the Family Finder test has absolutely nothing to do with mtDNA.
            Last edited by rucksack; 27 August 2010, 03:18 AM. Reason: posting cut off

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