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    Anyone else from I2b1 halogroup? This is my "predicted haplogroup". I keep trying to read where these people came from but it seems like I keep getting different answers. Anyone know for sure? lol

  • #2
    Originally posted by smith1 View Post
    Anyone else from I2b1 halogroup? This is my "predicted haplogroup". I keep trying to read where these people came from but it seems like I keep getting different answers. Anyone know for sure? lol
    That's I-M223. Here is what ISOGG (International Society of Genetic Genealogy) says about it:

    I2b1-M223 et al occurs in Britain and northwest continental Europe. I2b1a-M284 occurs almost exclusively in Britain, so it apparently originated there and has probably been present for thousands of years.
    http://www.isogg.org/tree/ISOGG_HapgrpI.html

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    • #3
      yes that is where my family tree records say my ancestors on that brach came from. Hook Norton Oxforshire England. I guess when family tree dna says "germanic" origins i guess they mean way back thousands of years ago. My records back to England are in the 1600's.

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      • #4
        My predicted haplogroup is the same as well. Even the same I-M223. I'm currently waiting on my deep clade test results to see what my tested HG comes back as.

        For what it's worth, my ancestral origins data leans toward Northern Ireland and Scotland. Though my paper records show southern Germany (the Palatine) as far back as the mid-1500's.

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        • #5
          Another I2b1

          I too am I2b1 or I-M223.

          Since I traced my lineage back to Coney Weston in the Norfolk area, I joined the East Anglia Geographic DNA project. Dave Weston the project adminstrator sent my y-chromosome sequence to Ken Nordtvedt (sp ?) for analysis. Ken concluded that I was descended from the Iceni or else one of the other local tribes. The Iceni preceded the Roman occupation and was noted for Queen Baudicca who launched a revolt against the Romans. A lot of history about that event.

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          • #6
            On my FTDNA results it has predicted group I and I4.

            However, after reading another site my results which included deletions is not yet placed into a clade.

            I matched and contacted a person who I matched exactly whose family came from Cornwall. That is where my Mt-DNA line originated as I traced it back to there. The Cole family, from Cornwall, Devon and Wales, many legends and many knights. Suppose to be they lost their land and migrated to Pennslyvania finally making their way to North Carolina where many settlers of Southwestern English from Cornwall and Devon settled. circa 1600

            The thing is my Great Grandma had jet black hair, light skin and Asian eyes. They were so mixed from 200 years in America from Welsh, Irish, Palatine German, Swiss German and Native Americans that who knows what the original mum who set foot on American soil even looked like, lol

            But yes, ancient British, and proud of it

            So does YDNA Haplogroup I, like above and MtDNA Haplogroup I, W, X pretty much equals true native Cro Magnon and aboriginal European ancestry?
            Last edited by BlackWolf; 18 July 2010, 11:15 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BlackWolf View Post
              On my FTDNA results it has predicted group I and I4.

              However, after reading another site my results which included deletions is not yet placed into a clade.

              I matched and contacted a person who I matched exactly whose family came from Cornwall. That is where my Mt-DNA line originated as I traced it back to there. The Cole family, from Cornwall, Devon and Wales, many legends and many knights. Suppose to be they lost their land and migrated to Pennslyvania finally making their way to North Carolina where many settlers of Southwestern English from Cornwall and Devon settled. circa 1600

              The thing is my Great Grandma had jet black hair, light skin and Asian eyes. They were so mixed from 200 years in America from Welsh, Irish, Palatine German, Swiss German and Native Americans that who knows what the original mum who set foot on American soil even looked like, lol

              But yes, ancient British, and proud of it

              So does YDNA Haplogroup I, like above and MtDNA Haplogroup I, W, X pretty much equals true native Cro Magnon and aboriginal European ancestry?
              According to my family tree records, my ancestors came from southern england then to Pa. and then to north Carolina and then to south carolina and ended up here in ga.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by smith1 View Post
                Anyone else from I2b1 halogroup? This is my "predicted haplogroup". I keep trying to read where these people came from but it seems like I keep getting different answers. Anyone know for sure? lol
                I am confirmed I2b1 (although the nomenclature of this subclade may soon change since it has very recently been reclassified on the ISOGG tree as I2a2a). From the research I have been doing, I2b1 is rather hard to pin down, because its members are scattered throughout Europe and found at much lower frequencies outside of Europe. Even in Europe its members rarely account for more than 10% or so of a given population. I'm not sure that even the leading researchers in the M223+ project can agree 100% about I2b1's origins or spread.

                It occurs with minor frequency in England and parts of Scotland, but is largely absent in Wales (from what I've read). I believe that it only occurs at frequencies above 10% of a given population in parts of Germany and eastern Sweden.

                In my own case, my father's side of the family is said to have emigrated from Scotland in the 1600's and ended up in Virginia.

                Additionally, there are emerging subgroups or clades within I2b1 that seem to have their own peculiar histories, migration patterns, etc. The well-established Isles group is prevalent in Great Britain while others are more commonly found places like Germany, etc. Hopefully as the database expands and new snps are discovered, a more detailed history will emerge.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ekc123 View Post
                  I am confirmed I2b1 (although the nomenclature of this subclade may soon change since it has very recently been reclassified on the ISOGG tree as I2a2a). From the research I have been doing, I2b1 is rather hard to pin down, because its members are scattered throughout Europe and found at much lower frequencies outside of Europe. Even in Europe its members rarely account for more than 10% or so of a given population. I'm not sure that even the leading researchers in the M223+ project can agree 100% about I2b1's origins or spread.

                  It occurs with minor frequency in England and parts of Scotland, but is largely absent in Wales (from what I've read). I believe that it only occurs at frequencies above 10% of a given population in parts of Germany and eastern Sweden.

                  In my own case, my father's side of the family is said to have emigrated from Scotland in the 1600's and ended up in Virginia.

                  Additionally, there are emerging subgroups or clades within I2b1 that seem to have their own peculiar histories, migration patterns, etc. The well-established Isles group is prevalent in Great Britain while others are more commonly found places like Germany, etc. Hopefully as the database expands and new snps are discovered, a more detailed history will emerge.
                  Are most of 12b1 white ? or other races as well ?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 507 View Post
                    Are most of 12b1 white ? or other races as well ?
                    Thanks for your comment. In my opinion, race is sort of a nebulous concept and largely, although perhaps not entirely, a social construct. I suppose I would identify myself as 'white,' although I have a perfect 12/12 I2b1 match who is African-American. In terms of ethnic groups, though, it is my understanding that I2b1 reaches its peak frequencies in certain parts of present-day Germany, eastern Sweden, and to a lesser extent England and northwestern Europe. There are exceptions, however, as there are groupings of I2b1 scattered throughout southern and eastern parts of Europe as well as Russia. I have also read of small clusters popping up in Turkey as well as other small clusters elsewhere. In the very distant past, ydna haplogroup IJ is said to have split into haplogroups I and J, respectively. If memory serves, this split has been stated to have occurred approximately 25,000 years ago. Today, y-dna haplogroup I is thought to be indigenous to Europe while y-dna haplogroup J, while occurring at moderate frequencies among some of the subclades in Europe, most frequently turns up in the Middle East, in very general terms.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ekc123 View Post
                      Thanks for your comment. In my opinion, race is sort of a nebulous concept and largely, although perhaps not entirely, a social construct. I suppose I would identify myself as 'white,' although I have a perfect 12/12 I2b1 match who is African-American. In terms of ethnic groups, though, it is my understanding that I2b1 reaches its peak frequencies in certain parts of present-day Germany, eastern Sweden, and to a lesser extent England and northwestern Europe. There are exceptions, however, as there are groupings of I2b1 scattered throughout southern and eastern parts of Europe as well as Russia. I have also read of small clusters popping up in Turkey as well as other small clusters elsewhere. In the very distant past, ydna haplogroup IJ is said to have split into haplogroups I and J, respectively. If memory serves, this split has been stated to have occurred approximately 25,000 years ago. Today, y-dna haplogroup I is thought to be indigenous to Europe while y-dna haplogroup J, while occurring at moderate frequencies among some of the subclades in Europe, most frequently turns up in the Middle East, in very general terms.
                      So basically, my Ydna ancestors could have came from anywhere. But, there aren't many of us at all ?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 507 View Post
                        So basically, my Ydna ancestors could have came from anywhere. But, there aren't many of us at all ?
                        I'm not sure I understand your point. As I said, I2b1 is currently believed to be indigenous to Europe, although it peaks in Germany and a few other areas in central Europe. My own ancestors are from Scotland, although there is not an overwhelming presence of I2b1 there, necessarily, relative to other haplogroups. I have read on some websites that I2b1 are descendents of the vikings and other similar claims, but I don't place too much stock in such assertions. So far as I know, the project administrators and researchers of the M223+ group are not really making such claims either at this point. I2b1 is a relatively small group within the overall haplogroup I population, making up no more than about 10% of total population in a given area.

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                        • #13
                          In otherwords, 507, all I am saying is that we can determine where I2b1 members reside today through testing, but sorting out whether its members are descendents of the Vikings or the Danes that invaded England, etc. is premature at this point, in my opinion. There is a lot of diversity in terms of location, haplotypes, etc. within I2b1 or I2a2a or whatever it is called -- the name changes faster than I can keep up with it.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ekc123 View Post
                            In otherwords, 507, all I am saying is that we can determine where I2b1 members reside today through testing, but sorting out whether its members are descendents of the Vikings or the Danes that invaded England, etc. is premature at this point, in my opinion. There is a lot of diversity in terms of location, haplotypes, etc. within I2b1 or I2a2a or whatever it is called -- the name changes faster than I can keep up with it.
                            Well, I am from the state of Georgia and my ancestor came from South Carolina in the 1850's so you can add the state of South Carolina to the list as well.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by 507 View Post
                              Well, I am from the state of Georgia and my ancestor came from South Carolina in the 1850's so you can add the state of South Carolina to the list as well.
                              I2b1 is believed to be indigenous to Europe and so your ancestors probably came to S.C. from Europe. But whether ALL I2b1 members are the descendents of Normans, Vikings, Saxons, or whatever - some websites promote one group over the other -- is pure speculation at this point in my opinion.

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