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  • Darren
    replied
    I agree with Jim, please let's try and keep this thread on topic pertaining to the original poster.

    -Darren Marin
    Family Tree DNA

    Leave a comment:


  • J Honeychuck
    replied
    Seeker64,

    I'm sorry to see your thread hijacked like this. Start a new thread if you have more questions. The moderator may want to shut this thread down.

    Incidentally, I checked www.smgf.org for you, and you have no matches there. I also checked the German DNA Project, and I saw no DYS388=14s among the G's there.

    I do think it's significant that the two approximate matches I found for you are apparently from the same area of Germany (the west, around Cologne).

    Regards,
    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • smith1
    replied
    Originally posted by dawer View Post
    There's also no way to know if dinosaurs are real or if they were planted in the ground by archeologists or if man did ever go to the moon
    funny you should mention that about the moon. Because i do NOT believe we ever walked on the moon.

    Leave a comment:


  • dawer
    replied
    Originally posted by smith1 View Post
    don't know yet. There is no way to know. There is no way to prove this type of dna testing is correct and legitamate and there is also now way to disprove it as being false. So it's either worthwhile and giving us good info or it's a total waste of money and time.
    There's also no way to know if dinosaurs are real or if they were planted in the ground by archeologists or if man did ever go to the moon

    Leave a comment:


  • T E Peterman
    replied
    Years ago, when I first heard of DNA testing for genealogy & saw the price, one word came to mind, "scam". My curiosity grew, especially since I have a BA in Anthropology & after reading "The Seven Daughters of Eve", by Bryan Sykes, decided to do the mtDNA test & later, their y-DNA test. The results from Oxford did nothing to verify whether or not this technology was real.

    After about a year, I switched to Family Tree DNA. Years have passed & I have had a number of cousins in different patrilines tested. In almost every case, my "faith" in this technology has been validated when two people I "know" should match, have (verified out to 37 or 67 markers), & when those who shouldn't match, haven't (ie, in most cases, they belong to different haplogroups).

    My challenge to all skeptics is to test Family Tree DNA without telling them. Test yourself & two other men, one should be a known patrilineal relative, the other definitely not a patrilineal relative. Then, sit back & enjoy the show as the results come in. You will be in for a pleasant surprise. Family Tree DNA has been vindicated so many times in various families that I'm connected to that I know the same will happen here.

    Timothy Peterman

    Leave a comment:


  • MMaddi
    replied
    Originally posted by smith1 View Post
    don't know yet. There is no way to know. There is no way to prove this type of dna testing is correct and legitamate and there is also now way to disprove it as being false. So it's either worthwhile and giving us good info or it's a total waste of money and time.
    Well, actually there is a way to possibly prove it's usefulness. In fact, you can read all kinds of success stories on this forum and there are news reports of adoptees succeeding in finding their biological father through the use of DNA testing.

    In your case, you've told us that you have two 37/37 matches. That indicates a common paternal line ancestor among the three of you probably within the last 200 years, possibly a bit more. I've already suggested to you that you collaborate with those two exact matches to find at least a common location and time where two or all three of you had a paternal line ancestor living. Maybe you can find the common ancestor.

    So, I'll just renew my advice and you can report back to us if you find a common ancestor or not. If you do find a common ancestor, that would indicate there's legitimate science behind all the numbers.

    Leave a comment:


  • smith1
    replied
    Originally posted by MMaddi View Post
    Well, that's great. I'm glad Rivergirl helped you to understand how things work. The problem was probably that you didn't know the right questions to ask and I and others didn't understand exactly what you were trying to find out. So the problem was on both ends.

    Now that you understand things better, thanks to Rivergirl, would you like to take back the accusation that FTDNA and genetic genealogy in general is a "scam" and a waste of money?

    don't know yet. There is no way to know. There is no way to prove this type of dna testing is correct and legitamate and there is also now way to disprove it as being false. So it's either worthwhile and giving us good info or it's a total waste of money and time.

    Leave a comment:


  • smith1
    replied
    Originally posted by mkdexter View Post
    When you see a motive of attention getting instead of a desire for help why feed it? If you really want to help him people, leave him alone.

    or you could just say " I don't know the answer". Would be better than bad info or excuses.

    Leave a comment:


  • mkdexter
    replied
    When you see a motive of attention getting instead of a desire for help why feed it? If you really want to help him people, leave him alone.

    Leave a comment:


  • MMaddi
    replied
    Originally posted by smith1 View Post
    THIS IS HELP ! THIS IS STRAIGHT ANSWERS ! Is this the only person on this entire website that talks in plain english and gives good information?

    [Rivergirl's explanation to smith1 can be seen in his posting.]

    Rivergirl you are by FAR the most helpful person on this website. I have been trying to get straight answers like this for nearly a month. Seems all the others do is talk in circles. I really appreciate it.
    Well, that's great. I'm glad Rivergirl helped you to understand how things work. The problem was probably that you didn't know the right questions to ask and I and others didn't understand exactly what you were trying to find out. So the problem was on both ends.

    Now that you understand things better, thanks to Rivergirl, would you like to take back the accusation that FTDNA and genetic genealogy in general is a "scam" and a waste of money?
    Last edited by MMaddi; 8 June 2010, 02:12 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • smith1
    replied
    THIS IS HELP ! THIS IS STRAIGHT ANSWERS ! Is this the only person on this entire website that talks in plain english and gives good information?


    QUOTE=rivergirl;228723]Most projects use FTDNA as the testing lab, but they may choose to have their website on another website, so they can have results from other labs shown.

    A results table is a spreadhseet with everyone results in a table format.
    DYS markers are along the top row, going left to right.
    Each person/Kit has his own row of results.
    Different colours show mismatches within the group.

    They may be split into groups of related men, clans, haplogroups, and those men not assigned to a group for whatever reason. (Usually no close matches within the group) It all depends on the project admin.

    Here is a link to the results table of Smith worldwide
    http://smithfamilies.net/results.html
    It is grouped by haplogroup and then connected groups within the haplogroups.
    E1b1b, R1a, R1b, G, I1, I2, J1, J2, Q and O.


    It makes it quite easy to see your results and others.
    They are all set up in the same order, so you can see if you mismatch any others at that particular marker.
    That is what you are really looking for, who you match and who you dont match.

    A mismatch is just as important as a match, as you can then say,
    well our genealogy says we match, our yDNA says we dont Why??, Have we got it wrong

    Or
    Well our geneaology doesnt match and our yDNA doesnt match, that is how it should be etc..

    or
    our genealogy doesnt match and our yDNA does match, what is the connection??

    Hope you here from the project soon.[/QUOTE]

    Rivergirl you are by FAR the most helpful person on this website. I have been trying to get straight answers like this for nearly a month. Seems all the others do is talk in circles. I really appreciate it.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Honeychuck
    replied
    seeker64,

    On www.YHRD.org, you have one 13-marker match to a native population, and that is a case from Cologne, Germany.

    Regards,
    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • smith1
    replied
    Originally posted by Max von Pif View Post
    @ Smith1: First of all, I joined the appropriate family group. What matters isn't all the allele values for the sake of knowing them. What matters is that I matched 67 out of 67 with the family my great grandfather was suspected of belonging to. Also, not trusting haplogroup predictions, I had a deep clade test done and it came out 100% identical to the others in the family group I joined. I would say that I am batting 1000 here! THAT is how you use DNA testing Smith1.

    The way YOU will use DNA testing will depend on what it is you want to know.
    It's easy to bat 1,000 when you have nothing to compare it to. You seem to be putting a lot of faith in hope-so's and maybe's and what if's. Sounds like you have more faith in the dna test that the ones that performed the test.

    Leave a comment:


  • T E Peterman
    replied
    My understanding is that most G2a men are from NW Europe (meaning north & west of the Alps) & they comprise about 2% on the NW European population.

    Since G appears to correlate to speakers of Caucasian languages, I have wondered if perhaps G's presence in central, southern, & western Europe is older than that of R1b, which correlates to speakers of the centum half of Indo-European languages & probably entered western Europe no earlier than maybe 3,000 BC.

    One of the good things about being G2a is that it should make it easier to find that needle in the haystack, since 98% of NW Europeans can be ruled out immediately as being possibly related to your patriline.

    Timothy Peterman

    Leave a comment:


  • westpa
    replied
    Join the G Project to learn more...

    Originally posted by ~Elizabeth~ View Post

    In addition to the resources Elizabeth noted above, take a look at the G project website here run by Ray Banks: http://www.members.cox.net/morebanks/G2Ideas.html

    Please join the haplo G project through the "join projects" page in your FTDNA profile. Comparing your results to the other 3500+ G's in the project database is probably the best way to get some answers.

    I'm no expert, but I am a G. Your results appear to be G2a, a subgroup of G. This subgroup is widely represented in Europe. In my case I'm G2a3b1a a more specific subgroup of G2a. My paternal line likely came from what is now Germany. Statistically, a small number of northern Europeans are haplo G, but statistics can be misleading. There are many G's from Germany, France, and England, in addition to other parts of Europe, as well as the Caucasus and Middle East. Some ancient skeletons dug up in Germany tested as G2a, so G's have been there for a long time.

    And J Honeychuck is right that DSY388=14 is uncommon. I would take this as good news. Some G's have very common markers and it doesn't help much to narrow down geographic area. When/if more people with 388=14 test, then you may have more info to compare with.

    Again, please join the project. If you have trouble finding the links to do so, please let us know. Ray Banks also sends out a weekly project newsletter by email that keeps you posted on all new developments in G research. By reading up on the web resources above and the weekly newsletter you'll start to understand more of the technical side of things and it will start to make more sense.

    Leave a comment:

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