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  • Severely Confused

    Hi Gang,

    I am very new to this site and new to FTDNA. I have received my results and I have read all of the literature backwards and forwards, I have even spoken to FTDNA representatives on the phone and I am still thoroughly confused as to what it all means

    I set out to find out the nationality of my father because I am trying to locate him or his remains. (I have never met him) All I wanted to know from the tests were if everything I

  • #2
    Originally posted by Seeker64 View Post
    Hi Gang,

    I am very new to this site and new to FTDNA. I have received my results and I have read all of the literature backwards and forwards, I have even spoken to FTDNA representatives on the phone and I am still thoroughly confused as to what it all means

    I set out to find out the nationality of my father because I am trying to locate him or his remains. (I have never met him) All I wanted to know from the tests were if everything I
    Your post got cut short.

    Which FTDNA test(s) did you take, and what were the haplogroup(s) of your results?

    Regards,
    Jim

    Comment


    • #3
      I was trying to say that I don't understand the results, and I don't know what they mean or how to read them.

      I'll try to post my results below.

      PANEL 1 (1-12)
      Locus 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
      DYS# 393 390 19* 391 385a 385b 426 388 439 389-1 392 389-2
      Alleles 13 22 15 10 14 14 11 14 11 12 11 29

      PANEL 2 (13-25)
      Locus 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
      DYS# 458 459a 459b 455 454 447 437 448 449 464a** 464b** 464c** 464d**
      Alleles 17 9 9 11 11 23 16 21 30 12 13 13 14

      PANEL 3 (26-37)
      Locus 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37
      DYS# 460 GATA H4 YCA II a YCA II b 456 607 576 570 CDY a CDY b 442 438
      Alleles 10 11 20 20 15 13 14 18 40 41 11 10

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Seeker64 View Post
        I was trying to say that I don't understand the results, and I don't know what they mean or how to read them.

        I'll try to post my results below.

        PANEL 1 (1-12)
        Locus 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
        DYS# 393 390 19* 391 385a 385b 426 388 439 389-1 392 389-2
        Alleles 13 22 15 10 14 14 11 14 11 12 11 29

        PANEL 2 (13-25)
        Locus 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
        DYS# 458 459a 459b 455 454 447 437 448 449 464a** 464b** 464c** 464d**
        Alleles 17 9 9 11 11 23 16 21 30 12 13 13 14

        PANEL 3 (26-37)
        Locus 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37
        DYS# 460 GATA H4 YCA II a YCA II b 456 607 576 570 CDY a CDY b 442 438
        Alleles 10 11 20 20 15 13 14 18 40 41 11 10
        Very good. Those are your Y-chromosome markers, which are identical, or almost identical, to your father's. There are several places you can look to see if there are any other people with those numbers, and if they are specific to any country or nationality.

        One place is the matches and maps pages of your FTDNA results.

        Another is to transfer your results automatically from FTDNA to www.ysearch.org and compare them to other cases there.

        And there are other places you can look.

        It's too late here in Europe for me to guide you through that right now. Maybe someone else will coach you this evening. Otherwise I will try tomorrow.

        Regards,
        Jim

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks so much.........

          Comment


          • #6
            Did you check your haplotree (link on left side of your homepage) to see your predicted haplogroup? It's in the top right corner of the haplotree page. Also, check your matches (link on the haplotree page) and you may get an idea of your haplogroup subclade (subgroup). If you don't see a predicted haplogroup, FTDNA will do a free "backbone" test to determine your basic haplogroup. When checking ySearch, you should limit your ySearch results to whatever that haplogroup is.

            Comment


            • #7
              My Haplogroup designation is "G"

              My problem is that all of this scientific verbiage literally means nothing to me, and I'm too thick-headed to understand any of it. All of the numbers in the DNA results page, means nothing to me.

              All I wanted was a clear answer as to what nationality my father is, and I'm more confused now than I ever was.

              I need my results explained to me in "lamens terms" (so that a child could understand) without having to have a PHD in clinical studies or DNA science.

              I think FTDNA is a wonderful organization, and they're very credible. If there was a survey box where you could submit your impressions, I would tell them that they should relay the results in a much less scientific, straight forward manner. In other words, bring it down 30.000 feet.

              If anyone on the forum is able to explain what my results mean, I'd be more than happy to post them.

              Thanks....................

              Comment


              • #8
                Haplogroup G is present in most of Europe and the Middle East. It is most common in the Middle East (eg Turkey) and Southern Europe (eg Italy), but it is not unknown, though it is rare, in the UK as well. Therefore you cannot establish the nationality just from the fact that you are G; however, if your prior is that your father was from Southern Europe/Middle East, then this piece of information makes this possibility more likely.

                As others were saying, what you can do now is to check whether, within haplogroup G, the alleles results you have written below have matches on the database mentioned (matches pages on your ftdna account, ysearch.org). The closer the alleles are to that of another person, the closer the relation between you and the other person. If, for instance, you match somebody else in all 37, then you're (distantly) related to this other person. So you can check whether your "matches" come from a specific country. For instance, if you have matches who all come from, say, Italy, then most likely your father was Italian.

                Matching just the first panel doesn't say much. To say something with some confidence, you need to match at 25 and better at 37. Also, note that the databases are big for countries like the UK or Skandinavia, but are rather small for southern Europe/middle east. Therefore, it is possible that you have no matches. In this case, you can still check who the people nearest to you are and where they come from, but you won't be able to pinpoint anything with great confidence.

                cacio
                Last edited by cacio; 3 June 2010, 11:41 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Your father

                  You don't say if you are adopted, or just have had no contact with your father. Do you know his name? about when or where he was born? Where were you born? There are lots of genealogical avenues you can try to see what you can find on him and then perhaps use the DNA results to confirm what you find.

                  Start with what you know, maybe we can help from there.

                  MJ

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Seeker64 View Post
                    My Haplogroup designation is "G"

                    My problem is that all of this scientific verbiage literally means nothing to me, and I'm too thick-headed to understand any of it. All of the numbers in the DNA results page, means nothing to me.

                    All I wanted was a clear answer as to what nationality my father is, and I'm more confused now than I ever was.

                    I need my results explained to me in "lamens terms" (so that a child could understand) without having to have a PHD in clinical studies or DNA science.
                    First up, the genetic genealogy, which is still in its infancy, has not yet reached the stage where it can point to a town on the map and say "your father came from here". At present, depending on the commonality or otherwise of your haplogroup, it can only suggest regions of the world and that is done by statistical probability.

                    Yes, there is quite a bit of jargon to digest and most if not all of us struggled with it at the beginning --- I certainly did -- but I followed the advice of people on here and other forums and eventually got to know enough about it to be dangerous. You don't need a PhD to master the fundamentals, just patience and the willingness to learn.

                    I recommend that you do as suggested above and upload your marker set to Ysearch. To do that automatically, go to your Y-DNA Matches page and scroll down until you see Click here to upload to Ysearch.org

                    As part of that process you will be assigned a Ysearch ID that you can share with others so that they can see where your marker set fits in relation to others. Also, you can use the various search options yourself to try to find matches at various genetic distances from yourself. Other Ysearch users can find you, too, and over time that may lead to a breakthrough for you.

                    Depending on the contents of the Ysearch database, you may learn quite a bit about the probabilities of your father's origins and you may find distant cousins. If you have difficulty with that process you will get help here ... but only after you initiate the upload.
                    Last edited by gtc; 4 June 2010, 02:05 AM. Reason: typo

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My understanding is that G reaches it's peak in the country of Georgia & is thought to have spread from the Caucasus to Anatolia & southern Europe. The concentration in northern Europe is maybe 2% at best.

                      Some think that the presence of G in Italy & elsewhere is a remnant of enclaves of speakers of Caucasian languages (eg, the Etruscans), who moved there thousands of years ago.

                      Timothy Peterman

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        seeker64,

                        I have put your data on www.ysearch.org as User ID GD5VM.

                        You have one interesting close match (but not close enough to be a recent relative): User ID QFKK3, Nicholas Bobb, died 1817 in Germany.

                        If German does not seem right for your father's ancestry, you don't have to accept that.

                        You should join Family Tree DNA's Y-DNA G Project. Join from your results page. That project has a very elaborate clustering process which might be useful to you. You can see the results already on that project at http://www.familytreedna.com/public/...ction=yresults

                        For any G experts reading this: seeker64 and Ysearch QFKK3 have a very rare DYS388=14. Whether that is significant or not, I don't know.

                        Regards,
                        Jim

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Seeker64 View Post
                          Hi Gang, I am very new to this site and new to FTDNA. I have received my results and I have read all of the literature backwards and forwards, I have even spoken to FTDNA representatives on the phone and I am still thoroughly confused as to what it all means

                          I set out to find out the nationality of my father because I am trying to locate him or his remains. (I have never met him) All I wanted to know from the tests were if everything I
                          FIRST: don't try to assign a meaning to all of those numbers. That can drive anyone crazy!!! Y-DNA tests can provide information about two things. Your Haplotype, all of those numbers, can point you to others who share your paternal, your father's father's father's---father's, line. Your Haplogroup, G in your case, can point to the origin of your paternal line 1,000's of years ago. Please share your surname with us. If you believe you have a different paternal surname and you know what it is share that also.

                          From your message that got cut off you seem to want to know more about your father. If that is correct tells us what you already know. Tell us about your 37 marker matches. You can find the link to these in the left hand column of your myFTDNA website by clicking on Matches under the Y-DNA heading.

                          If you aren't in a surname project join the one for your surname. If you have a lot of matches with a different surname join that project also. Go to your myFTDNA website and click on Join Projects in the left hand column.

                          If you haven't done so you might want to add your results to Ysearch, near the bottom of the left hand column. Then share you Ysearch ID with us.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi,

                              Here is a link to the G project.

                              http://www.familytreedna.com/public/G-YDNA/default.aspx


                              and here is a wikipedia link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_G_(Y-DNA)


                              http://www.genebase.com/tutorial/item.php?tuId=15

                              https://genographic.nationalgeograph.../en/atlas.html
                              Last edited by ~Elizabeth~; 4 June 2010, 09:08 AM.

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