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  • decodeme-any point getting it now.

    given decodeme declared bankupcy and given that some people think it will very soon stop offering personal genomic testing, I guess it would be crazy to get testing now? I preferred decodeme to 23 and me primarily because it was willing to give the raw data with every SNP upon asking- but 23 and me told me they would not provide this info even if requested. (decode me also tested more locations and provided better interpretation). so i'm not a happy camper.

  • #2
    Originally posted by penguin View Post
    given decodeme declared bankupcy and given that some people think it will very soon stop offering personal genomic testing, I guess it would be crazy to get testing now? I preferred decodeme to 23 and me primarily because it was willing to give the raw data with every SNP upon asking- but 23 and me told me they would not provide this info even if requested. (decode me also tested more locations and provided better interpretation). so i'm not a happy camper.
    It appears that you ordered the "Ancestry Edition" of 23andMe and correct, they will not give you the raw data. They will give you the full file, however, if you "upgrade" for the $100 or so dollars and add the Health component (so in effect you have the complete edition and access to your raw data file). Contrast this to shelling out $2000 for deCODEme.

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    • #3
      that's pretty cool. I haven't ordered either test yet- I had gotten the info a while back when deciding which I would use. if I get the 100 more expensive version, can I also download all the snps-or do you mean it can only be accesed online but not downloaded?
      . my recollection was I also like decodeme because they used more snips- like a million- and because they provided excellent intreretations backed by their scientific research. here's a tip if u don't know- as a 23 and me customer you can now get decode me intrepretation for free! If u end up doing that, could you please post on comparison of 23 and me vs decode me interpretation ? (on the snps they both test I guess)
      Last edited by penguin; 4 June 2010, 08:08 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by penguin View Post
        that's pretty cool. I haven't ordered either test yet- I had gotten the info a while back when deciding which I would use. if I get the 100 more expensive version, can I also download all the snps-or do you mean it can only be accesed online but not downloaded?
        . my recollection was I also like decodeme because they used more snips- like a million- and because they provided excellent intreretations backed by their scientific research. here's a tip if u don't know- as a 23 and me customer you can now get decode me intrepretation for free! If u end up doing that, could you please post on comparison of 23 and me vs decode me interpretation ? (on the snps they both test I guess)
        You can download all the 23andMe SNPs if you order the complete edition.

        DeCODEme's offer to import 23andMe data was time-limited. I have tested a number of relatives at 23andMe for my own study on a familial hearing impairment. I imported their data into deCODEme, and the chromosome diagrams showed similar matching segments. However, deCODEme's analysis of relationships went no further than 1st cousins, while 23andMe correctly identified 2nd and 3rd cousins. Also, deCODEme will not search its database for unknown relatives.

        23andMe has many more Y and mtDNA SNPs than deCODEme, so they can be more informative about subhaplogroups.

        DeCODEme has a nice multi-dimensional analysis of your similarities to various geographical regions. 23andMe's analysis is two-dimensional.

        There are too many SNPs related to health to post comparisons here.

        All in all, if you have $2000 to spare, I think it would be better spent testing several known relatives at 23andMe or FTDNA.

        Ann Turner
        Disclosure: I have a consulting arrangement with 23andMe, but the statements expressed above are my own and not official policy of 23andMe.

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        • #5
          thanks for the comparison. I guess decode me was more known for its medical research, so not surprising if finding cousins is better on 23 and me. I still like decode me, but with its future uncertain its not clear what to do- rush for the test and hope I get all info they have to offer before they vanish?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by penguin View Post
            thanks for the comparison. I guess decode me was more known for its medical research, so not surprising if finding cousins is better on 23 and me. I still like decode me, but with its future uncertain its not clear what to do- rush for the test and hope I get all info they have to offer before they vanish?
            You can create demo accounts at both deCODEme and 23andMe and see if you think that deCODEme is worth the extra $1500. I do think you should make the decision fairly soon if you want to go with deCODEme.

            Just a side note -- when I first began my family study for our inherited hearing impairment, I thought that 1,000,000 vs 500,000 SNPs would be a significant advantage and I tested myself and two relatives there. The price for the two products was virtually the same at the time, about $1000. When 23andMe reduced their price, I tested more relatives there. It really made no difference in determining the region where the gene must be located.

            Some Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) may list a SNP from the 1,000,000 panel, but fairly often, there is a "proxy" in the 500K set (a neighboring SNP that lets you predict the value of the listed SNP).

            23andMe will use GWAS studies from deCODEme (probably the single most productive source of findings) in their reports. However, 23andMe requires confirmation by an independent study before putting a gold star rating on a report.

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            • #7
              were you able to localize the gene? post the reference when its published-sounds like nice work. I know some of the mtda work on deafness, but I guess yours is nuclear. (i've been counting on hapmap to tell me about correlations for whatever snps I do end up having tested-whether 1/2 or 1 million). hey- maybe you know how I can search for a particular coding region mutation in genbank within any haplogroup- all I know how to do in genbank is to put in a fasta sequence (or ascension no.) and get nearest matches. but I want to find all sequences that contain a particular mutation.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by penguin View Post
                were you able to localize the gene? post the reference when its published-sounds like nice work. I know some of the mtda work on deafness, but I guess yours is nuclear. (i've been counting on hapmap to tell me about correlations for whatever snps I do end up having tested-whether 1/2 or 1 million). hey- maybe you know how I can search for a particular coding region mutation in genbank within any haplogroup- all I know how to do in genbank is to put in a fasta sequence (or ascension no.) and get nearest matches. but I want to find all sequences that contain a particular mutation.
                We've localized the region, but not the gene -- there are over 200 known genes in the section. The University of Iowa has started to sequence some of those.

                Probably the easiest way to look for specific mutations is to look at the source code for Ian Logan's Checker pages (there are two of them).

                http://www.ianlogan.co.uk/checker/genbank.htm

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