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  • Why more money ??????????????????

    I thought for the 37 marker test I would find out my "haplogroup". Now I am told this is only "predicted" and to find out my haplogroup i have to order more tests and spend even more money. I feel very mislead. I have emailed family tree dna twice and complained and asked for an explanation but am not getting any response at all.

  • #2
    Originally posted by smith1 View Post
    I thought for the 37 marker test I would find out my "haplogroup". Now I am told this is only "predicted" and to find out my haplogroup i have to order more tests and spend even more money. I feel very mislead. I have emailed family tree dna twice and complained and asked for an explanation but am not getting any response at all.
    How were you misled? Did FTDNA publish something that said your haplogroup would be confirmed with the 37 marker STR test?

    The only way to confirm haplogroup is to test for SNPs via deep clade testing, which is a different process and service altogether.

    What is your predicted haplogroup?

    It's my impression that FTDNA predicts haplogroup with pretty good accuracy and, from looking at various databases of haplotypes, not too many people appear interested in deep clade testing, but it's there if desired.

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    • #3
      I didn't need family tree dna to tell me I am white. I can pretty well look in the mirror and gather that. Anything past that and i suppose i can guess too. So basically Im confused about what the test was for and what information it provided, if any. I thought with a 37 marker test from family tree dna I would discover "facts" not simply a person's guess. I can guess.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by smith1 View Post
        I didn't need family tree dna to tell me I am white. I can pretty well look in the mirror and gather that. Anything past that and i suppose i can guess too. So basically Im confused about what the test was for and what information it provided, if any. I thought with a 37 marker test from family tree dna I would discover "facts" not simply a person's guess. I can guess.
        If you are confused what the test was for, I have to ask why you ordered it in the first place. What research had you done, and/or advice had you sought, about Y-DNA testing prior to ordering?

        What, if anything, do you know from your own genealogical work about your paternal origins?

        You stated that you were not happy with being told your predicted as opposed to confirmed haplogroup, yet you imply that you could guess it.

        Again, what is your predicted haplogroup?

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        • #5
          Somebody more knowledgeable please correct me, but here is my take on "predicted" haplogroup.

          I only have the 37 marker test, but am waiting for the 67 marker upgrade. If I go into the Haplotree portion of my ftdna homepage and then click on the "Matches" tab, it shows how many matches I have in the database for the various haplogroups. I have an overwhelmingly large number of matches (including up to 4 step mutations) in the r1b1b2a1b5b haplogroup. Thus, I think it's safe to "predict" that as my haplogroup. And indeed, FTDNA predicts my haplogroup as r1b1b2.

          Also, in total match count, Ireland edges out Scotland (not by much) with England coming in third. I think this is good information. Pretty strong evidence to my way of thinking.

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          • #6
            when i log in to family tree dna and click on "haplotree". It says "your PREDICTED haplogroup is 12b1". I ordered the test because i thought i would get some straight answers. I have paperwork and an old fashioned family tree in a notebook on the paternal line back to the 1600's. I didn't study this and find this stuff out, my dad did. He's dead now and I'm not sure where he found out his information. I joined the "surname project" for my last name. The group admin and I started emailing back and forth and from the way he described it I could get some answers and confirmation from this test. When I go to the "results page" for the surname project there is this huge graph with letters and numbers all over it. On the far left there are some names and dates. I swabbed my mouth and payed the money back in October of last year.

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            • #7
              Click on HaploTree and then click on the matches tab.

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              • #8
                when i click on "my matches" it says i have one "exact match" from England. Then under that it says " 1 step mutation". And then it lists England again and Ireland and a couple other places. What exacty is an "exact match" ? Far as I know i don't have a twin and neither I nor my parents have ever set foot in England. And i know I'm not handsome by any means but "mutated" ???? good grief !

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                • #9
                  so thus far I have been advised I am white and ugly. I did NOT need a scientist to tell me that !

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by smith1 View Post
                    so thus far I have been advised I am white and ugly. I did NOT need a scientist to tell me that !
                    Well, if you want our advice, one place to start is to tell us what you hope to find through DNA testing. There are various reasons people resort to it for genealogical information.

                    Some men have a brick wall, perhaps they were adopted or there's an illegitimacy suspected, and they want to find the paternal line they came from and, through that, connect with their biological relatives. It's a very strong reason to have your DNA testing and usually it's the only way you'll find your relatives.

                    Some men have done genealogical research and have not been able to prove through birth, marriage and death documents that they and someone else with the same surname have a common ancestor. DNA testing is one way to determine if they do have a common ancestor and roughly how long ago he may have lived. If they find their test results indicate a common ancestor, then they can do further research and have a better chance to find him since they've narrowed down when he possibly lived. If the results indicate they don't have a common ancestor in several hundred or over 1,000 years, then they know they shouldn't waste more time researching for a common ancestor.

                    Some men are just curious about what their y chromosome may tell them about the deep ancestry of their paternal line. This is where haplogroups come in. Your 37 marker results will give you a prediction of your haplogroup, which relates to deep ancestry (over 1,000 years). But if you are seriously interested in finding out more, then you will want to order a deep clade test to confirm your haplogroup and find out which twig of that branch you belong on. PLEASE NOTE - if you are testing yourself for the first two reasons and not this one (knowing deep ancestry), then a deep clade test is not necessary; the 37 marker results will do.

                    So, what are you hoping to find out from your test results?

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                    • #11
                      the second reason is it. See the group admin person of my surname study i joined says that his paperwork and my paperwork and lots of others in the surname project are the same once you get back to the late 1600's. My records show that my ancestors came from England and then to Pa. and then on down south by civil war times. All these records are is my family's best guess and through word of mouth from my great, great uncles who were living back in the 1970's when dad done all the research. Supposedly I am a distant cousin to all these people on the surname project. I thought the 37 marker test could confirm this and at least give me a good estimate as to how far back our common ancestor is and possibly if all our records are correct.

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                      • #12
                        ^ Be sure to check your preferences tab.

                        You should be comparing against the entire database, not just your surname.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rucksack View Post
                          ^ Be sure to check your preferences tab.

                          You should be comparing against the entire database, not just your surname.

                          And how do i do that ? I clicked on "my matches" on the haplotree link. It says i have one exact match in England, then it starts on the "mutation" stuff that confuses me. Also, how in the world can i have an 'exact match" in England?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by smith1 View Post
                            when i log in to family tree dna and click on "haplotree". It says "your PREDICTED haplogroup is 12b1". I ordered the test because i thought i would get some straight answers. I have paperwork and an old fashioned family tree in a notebook on the paternal line back to the 1600's. I didn't study this and find this stuff out, my dad did. He's dead now and I'm not sure where he found out his information. I joined the "surname project" for my last name. The group admin and I started emailing back and forth and from the way he described it I could get some answers and confirmation from this test. When I go to the "results page" for the surname project there is this huge graph with letters and numbers all over it. On the far left there are some names and dates. I swabbed my mouth and payed the money back in October of last year.
                            Hi.

                            I2b1

                            "Haplogroup I2b1 seem to correlate fairly well with the extent of historical influence of Germanic peoples. Haplogroup I2b1 has been found in over 4% of the population only in Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, England (not including Wales or Cornwall), Scotland, and the southern tips of Sweden and Norway in Northwest Europe; the provinces of Normandy, Maine, Anjou, and Perche in northwestern France; the province of Provence in southeastern France; the regions of Tuscany, Umbria, and Latium in Italy; and Moldavia and the area around Russia's Ryazan Oblast and Republic of Mordovia in Eastern Europe. One subclade of Haplogroup I2b1, namely I2b1a (M284), has been found almost exclusively among the population of Great Britain, suggesting that the clade may have a very long history in that island."


                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_I2_(Y-DNA)



                            An exact match in England with only one mutation is excellent! That could be the family line your father's English ancestor descends from. Congratulations.
                            Last edited by rainbow; 19 May 2010, 07:31 PM.

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                            • #15
                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_I2_(Y-DNA)

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