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DNA Tests would be interesting on these Vikings

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  • DNA Tests would be interesting on these Vikings

    Weymouth ridgeway skeletons 'Scandinavian Vikings'

    Fifty-one decapitated skeletons found in a burial pit in Dorset were those of Scandinavian Vikings, scientists say.


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...et/8563377.stm

  • #2
    Oops! Apparently, they have. Will be interesting to see more results posted at a later date.

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    • #3
      Executed shipwrecked Vikings? known Historic incident?

      Fuller DNA results anxiously awaited!
      This burial may well be connected with the reported fortuitous shipwreck of a "Danish" invasion fleet off this part of Dorset by a surprise gale in the reign of Alfred. Survivors would probably have been tried and executed.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by derinos View Post
        Fuller DNA results anxiously awaited!
        This burial may well be connected with the reported fortuitous shipwreck of a "Danish" invasion fleet off this part of Dorset by a surprise gale in the reign of Alfred. Survivors would probably have been tried and executed.
        Also mentioned here- (Swanwick is an exposed headland and port near to this burial):-

        "Northvegr".Year 877, from " Life of King Alfred", written by his amanuensis Asser.
        " He also gave orders to his sailors to prevent them from obtaining any supplies by sea; and his sailors were encountered by a fleet of a hundred and twenty ships full of armed soldiers, who were come to help their countrymen. As soon as the king's men knew that they were fitted with pagan soldiers, they leaped to their arms, and bravely attacked those barbaric tribes: but the pagans, who had now for almost a month been tossed and almost wrecked among the waves of the sea, fought vainly against them; their bands were discomfited in a moment, and all were sunk and drowned in the sea, at a place called Suanewic.
        ... the army of pagans, leaving Wareham, partly on horseback and partly by water, arrived at Suanewic, (where one hundred and twenty of their ships were lost)and king Alfred pursued their land-army as far as Exeter; there he made a covenant with them, and took hostages that they would depart. "

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Krootie View Post
          Oops! Apparently, they have. Will be interesting to see more results posted at a later date.
          The articles published to date that I have seen only mention tests on isotopes and carbon dating. I have seen no mention of DNA testing yet. I hope that somebody plans to attempt DNA tests.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by derinos View Post
            Also mentioned here- (Swanwick is an exposed headland and port near to this burial):-

            "Northvegr".Year 877, from " Life of King Alfred", written by his amanuensis Asser.
            " He also gave orders to his sailors to prevent them from obtaining any supplies by sea; and his sailors were encountered by a fleet of a hundred and twenty ships full of armed soldiers, who were come to help their countrymen. As soon as the king's men knew that they were fitted with pagan soldiers, they leaped to their arms, and bravely attacked those barbaric tribes: but the pagans, who had now for almost a month been tossed and almost wrecked among the waves of the sea, fought vainly against them; their bands were discomfited in a moment, and all were sunk and drowned in the sea, at a place called Suanewic.
            ... the army of pagans, leaving Wareham, partly on horseback and partly by water, arrived at Suanewic, (where one hundred and twenty of their ships were lost)and king Alfred pursued their land-army as far as Exeter; there he made a covenant with them, and took hostages that they would depart. "
            For those who look at Google terrain maps of DNA-historic areas of interest, the "Swanewic" mentioned by Asser is now known as Swanage, which became for a time a Royal seashore resort under the Georges.

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