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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    gtc, thanks for a rundown of what happens from here on out. That's great info. I am glad you mentioned that it can be out of order and/or a week between getting panels. It's good to know that in advance.

    I just bought Deep Ancestry - it was available on Kindle so I don't have to wait for it to arrive! Thanks for the suggestion!
    Christy

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  • gtc
    replied
    Originally posted by Britco View Post
    gtr, Thanks for the advice! I ordered the test today. My dad said he would take it. I went ahead and got the 67 marker one. Hopefully it will ship soon and we can get started on finding out where we come from!
    That's a very good start. It's always great to have the active co-operation of the "subject". You'll get 3 vials in the test kit. Make sure your father gets 3 good scrapes as per the instructions so that the lab can make progress from the get-go.

    After a few weeks -- depending on lab workload, etc, -- his results will typically come through in "panels" of STRs such as positions 1-12 first, then perhaps 26-37, 13-25, 38-67 ... the order of posting results can be random like that, with a week or more between each panel.

    Alphabet soup - yes, I can totally relate. I wonder if I will ever be as clear on it as some of you all! It seems complicated, but hopefully after I get the results it will start to make more sense.
    Once again, I recommend you get "Deep Ancestry":

    http://www.amazon.com/Deep-Ancestry-...5038578&sr=8-1


    Wouldn't it be great if we could just get inside our ancestor's heads? lol I keep wishing I were interested in this stuff when my g-grandfather was alive. But he died when I was 12. i remember him trying to tell us stories about growing up, but we didn't really care. lol I care NOW!
    I kick myself for not getting interested in genealogy 20 or 30 years ago when my relatives were still alive. But, as you say, young people are hardly ever interested in stories of the "old days" and of old (or dead) people they'll never meet.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks everyone!
    rucksack, I didn't know about Hull being a drop off point. That's interesting and now makes more sense. Maybe he changed his name when he got here to Peter?? Although, isn't Alfred a pretty anglo-sounding name if his goal was to appear English why would he change it to Peter?
    Those are great articles - I saved them so that i'll have them readily available if it does match up after I get the dna results back from my father.

    gtr, Thanks for the advice! I ordered the test today. My dad said he would take it. I went ahead and got the 67 marker one. Hopefully it will ship soon and we can get started on finding out where we come from!
    Alphabet soup - yes, I can totally relate. I wonder if I will ever be as clear on it as some of you all! It seems complicated, but hopefully after I get the results it will start to make more sense.

    Wouldn't it be great if we could just get inside our ancestor's heads? lol I keep wishing I were interested in this stuff when my g-grandfather was alive. But he died when I was 12. i remember him trying to tell us stories about growing up, but we didn't really care. lol I care NOW! My dad remembers some stories, but he doesn't know how accurate they are. My grandpa is kind of secretive about it all (which is frustrating).
    My g-grandfather told my dad that his father (or grandfather??) lived near the Caspian Sea and was a livestock caretaker for the Russian Tzar - don't know how true that is, but if he had a jewish name, he would have had to change his name in order to get a job like that, right? Weren't the Tzars in the 1800s pretty antisemetic? My g-grandfather hid his ancestry from anyone outside the family, in fact, he married a Catholic woman and didn't raise my grandpa or his siblings in any religion. ....that's pretty much all we know. lol IF it is in fact true. I'm sure that's wayyy more than you wanted to know, but i started typing and just never stopped. lol

    Thanks everyone! I'll keep you posted!
    Christy

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  • gtc
    replied
    Originally posted by Britco View Post
    IThat being said, if I have my dad take the ydna 67, will this lead us in the right direction? I'm not sure if this will help us or if it will confuse the situation even more being that I have no idea what the last name could have been (IF it was even changed).

    is it better to have my dad take the test (i have no brothers) or my male first cousin? I don't know if my cousin would do it or not, but I'll ask him if it's more beneficial to have someone from my generation take it.

    Also, I look at all these numbers/letters everyone posts and it just feels like I'm reading some other language. Is it spelled out more clearly when you get your results or do i just post my results here and let the "experts" figure it out for me? LOL

    Thanks everyone!
    Christy
    Hi Christy. Welcome to the forum.

    I'm not an expert on Jewish ancestry, however I have seen quite a bit of discussion on it on other forums and it appears that the main "tribes" (if that's the correct term) of Jewish people are fairly readily identified by haplogroup, and haplogroup is usually predicted fairly accurately by FTDNA as a result of the STR marker test.

    It would be best to have your father tested, if he is willing. Failing that, a paternal cousin. It is also recommended that you get as many markers tested as you can afford, with 67 being the ideal. This ensures that any surname or kinship matching, via FTDNA's database or public databases such as Ysearch, is given the best shot. There may be other distant cousins out there somewhere in the world already looking for your father.

    Genetics and genetic genealogy can seem like alphabet soup. It took me quite a bit of reading and questions on forums to get up to speed with it to the extent that I can hold a reasonably sensible conversation with experienced people. A book I highly recommend for beginners is "Deep Ancestry" by Spencer Wells. It is written in an interesting and accessible manner, and is a good reference for when you forget things.

    When the results come through, you will get some fairly high level explanation from FTDNA, and there is more information available on the FTDNA website. However, you'll usually get quite a bit of help and advice from people on this forum.

    Also, if your great grandfather's/father's original surname is firmly established, you can look for surname projects that specialize in it. If a relevant project exists that FTDNA knows about, they will alert you to it on the Y matches section of the My FTDNA Page of your account. (By the way, as seen on shows like "Who Do You Think You Are?", male lines with Jewish origins have sometimes had a number of surname changes/variations down through the generations as the families moved from place to place.)

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  • rucksack
    replied
    Interestingly, there is a surname of Bretthauer listed. Maybe I am optimistic to think that Britton is a possible anglicizing of it?

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  • rucksack
    replied
    Well, it could be the record of his father.

    I believe the "census" in this scenario might only refer to a passenger list or short term stay because of the Hull connection. Hull was the usual "drop off" point for ships and travelers to North America.

    I neglected to mention that the people I mentioned in the prior post were "Germans". They intermarried with other "Russian Germans" from the "Walter Colony" in Russia: http://erikas.cc/walter/History.htm

    http://www.lhm.org/LID/lidhist.htm

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks for the info - I did see that, but my g-grandfather (Abraham/Arthur) was born in 1901. Now my g-g-grandfather, Peter Britton was born in about 1869, which fits, but it still doesn't explain the Jewish history, especially with the England Census info, does it? Or is the English Census info not stating their origin?
    Christy
    Last edited by Britco; 31 January 2010, 10:51 PM.

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  • rucksack
    replied
    From Family Search.org

    Alfred Britton
    Male

    Event(s):
    Birth:
    14 JAN 1868 Odessa, , Russia
    Christening:
    Death:
    Burial:

    Parents:
    Father: William Britton
    Mother: Mary Ann Trott

    ===============================

    Alfred BRITTON Household
    Male

    Other Information:
    Birth Year <1869>
    Birthplace Odessa B S, Russia
    Age 12
    Occupation Scholar
    Marital Status U <Unmarried>
    Head of Household William BRITTON
    Relation Son
    Disability

    Source Information:
    Dwelling 21 Campbell St
    Census Place Kingston-upon-Hull, York, England
    Family History Library Film 1342154
    Public Records Office Reference RG11
    Piece / Folio 4779 / 54
    Page Number 2

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Change of Name

    Change of Name

    I admit, I'm more than a little overwhelmed at the thought of beginning this process. I've been working on my ancestry for years now. I'm pretty happy with where I have gotten, but there are still those questions and that one road block that I can't get through.

    My maiden name is Britton. I know that my great grandfather was raised Jewish, spoke Yiddish, (although "hid" it as an adult around others) and his parents came to the US from Russia (according to census bureaus arrival in 1881 or 1885).
    According to my research, Britton is not a Russian or Jewish name. I do know that my great grandfather's first name was Abraham before he changed it to Arthur. His siblings names were changed as well. (Morris/Maurice, Ida/?, Mary/Marie). So, I am making the assumption that his father (Peter) changed his last name to Britton sometime before coming to the US since it seems to be an English name, not a Russian Jewish name.
    The last name just doesn't fit with everything I know about my family's history.

    That being said, if I have my dad take the ydna 67, will this lead us in the right direction? I'm not sure if this will help us or if it will confuse the situation even more being that I have no idea what the last name could have been (IF it was even changed).

    is it better to have my dad take the test (i have no brothers) or my male first cousin? I don't know if my cousin would do it or not, but I'll ask him if it's more beneficial to have someone from my generation take it.

    Also, I look at all these numbers/letters everyone posts and it just feels like I'm reading some other language. Is it spelled out more clearly when you get your results or do i just post my results here and let the "experts" figure it out for me? LOL

    Thanks everyone!
    Christy
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