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  • #46
    Originally posted by vinnie View Post
    On the contrary, I believe that it's those of us in the diasporas who may provide the most accurate genetic picture of the sending countries, at least at the time of the immigrations, since populations have changed in so many of these countries since the majority of the immigration occurred.

    Just thought I'd let you know that I have cousins in America,Canada and England and there aren't many of us here that haven't.So if they want to get deep clade tested good luck to them.I'm pretty sure that we have the same SNPs.
    FTDNA have tested 10,600 people whose ancestors came from Ireland!!More than any other country in the world.

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    • #47
      For me, the really fascinating think about SNP testing and deep ancestry is the possibility of learning something about the pre-historic migrations of people. We know almost nothing about the history of central and western Europe before about 2000 years ago. SNP testing can help provide clues to that missing history, although, it is most useful for that purpose if you know where your paternal or maternal line ancestors lived before more recent migrations. There are many Americans who don't know where their immigrant ancestors came from, so SNP testing for them is not as useful for understanding pre-historic migrations. (Although they can still benefit if/when their SNP origins are identified.)

      As gtc said, we really need to get more people tested who know their ancestors' place of origin ca 200-300 years ago, and especially those from under represented areas. Ireland and the UK are pretty heavily tested, but then you need a lot of people tested to identify statistical patterns within current populations. It might take many years, but I think eventually we will develop a pretty complete SNP tree for each haplogroup, and that we might be able to learn something about populations movements both pre-historic and in more recent times.

      For the Walk through the Y tests, they only test a small fraction of the y-DNA and they don't always find new SNPs, so it requires careful selection of the testee to make it worthwhile. We will make more rapid progress on that when testing gets cheaper and they can test a larger portion of the y genome for each person.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by 1798 View Post
        FTDNA have tested 10,600 people whose ancestors came from Ireland!!
        Whose ancestors possibly came from Ireland. There has been discussion here and elsewhere on the reliability of "origin" as stated in FTDNA's and other databases when the person entering the data does not necessarily have any documentation to support it.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by gtc View Post
          Whose ancestors possibly came from Ireland. There has been discussion here and elsewhere on the reliability of "origin" as stated in FTDNA's and other databases when the person entering the data does not necessarily have any documentation to support it.
          Well, you know the old saying: There are people who are Irish, and people who wish they were Irish. I belong to the Irish Project just in case.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
            Well, you know the old saying: There are people who are Irish, and people who wish they were Irish. I belong to the Irish Project just in case.


            I think the current vogue is to try to prove you're Viking.

            And, of course, the question of reliability of what's stated in these origin fields isn't limited to those who enter "Ireland".

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            • #51
              different roads

              There is another old saying: All roads lead to Rome. There is the documented paper trail road; the DNA matching road; and the family stories/legends/mythology road. For me, the first road is washed out in places. So I have to fall back on the other two, to point me in the right general direction.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by PDHOTLEN View Post
                There is another old saying: All roads lead to Rome. There is the documented paper trail road; the DNA matching road; and the family stories/legends/mythology road. For me, the first road is washed out in places. So I have to fall back on the other two, to point me in the right general direction.
                Point taken, and I have commented elsewhere that it would help if these databases provided an additional field to origin which denoted the status of the value entered, as either "documented" or "likely". I know there would be debate about the definition of "documented", but if the default value were to be "likely" then chances are most people without good documentation would go with that.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by SEREGA784 View Post
                  I wonder if the Deep Clade Test will be beneficial to me and will it give me more info.

                  My Y-Haplogroup: R1a*
                  Unless FTDNA quietly begins to include M458 in the R1a Deep Clade, the answer is no. The R1a Deep Clade is essentially worthless except in very rare cases.

                  M458 is fairly common in Eastern Europe, particularly the West Slavic countries, but it is ordered through the Advanced menu, not the Deep Clade.

                  If you create a Ysearch entry with your marker values, we can give you more specific advice.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Daniel72 View Post
                    What he meant is, that L48 isnt reall all that common in Ireland but more common in the Lower Countries or northern Germany, wich suggests Anglo-Saxon roots rather than Irish-Celtic ones if it comes to "Deep Anchestry".


                    Some people think that Austria is the place of origin of U106. Isn't that were the Hallstat culture originated? L48 is downstream of U106. Are you saying the Anglo-Saxons were descended from the Celts? I thought Germany was another Celtic country.

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                    • #55
                      It really all depends on how you define Celtic or Germanic. I am inclined to define P312 as the highest node for Celtic & P312's brother, U106 as the highest node for proto-Celts that became German.

                      The German language, as well as German y-DNA suggests that Germans are a blend of three major populations:

                      1. a R1b, centum speaking portion that some would call Celtic.

                      2. a R1a, satem speaking portion that some would call Slavic.

                      3. an I1, aboriginal prtion that was non-Indo European

                      If you strip away the Celtic portion & the Slavic portion, because "they can't really be German", you are left with a non-IndoEuropean base. And that clearly runs contrary to common sense.

                      Timothy Peterman

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by dok101 View Post
                        I do not know if any applications have been rejected, but the terms do include the following: "The GRC laboratory director decides if and when an application will be accepted based on the scientific importance."

                        To which haplogroup and subclade do you belong?
                        I belong to R1b and I've wasted money on four SNP tests.I am negative on all of them.
                        I may be accepted for the WTY test since I am one of the few from Ireland who has been tested.The only thing is I would like to keep the results private.Is that possible?

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by 1798 View Post
                          I belong to R1b and I've wasted money on four SNP tests.I am negative on all of them.
                          The chances of getting negative results are fairly high, but can be mitigated somewhat by the right choices of test.

                          A few questions ...

                          Are you testing with FTDNA?

                          What are your test results to date?

                          Mine are: L1- L47- L48+ L148- P107- U106+ U198-

                          Because I am U106, I joined the S21/U106 project and the leadership of that group, which keeps itself up to date on developments below U106, has been suggesting which tests I take and in what sequence. At the moment I am at L48 and holding until a new downstream SNP is discovered. I tested for L47 and L148 when they emerged, but as you see I was negative for both, so there was no point in testing for L44, L45, L46 and L164.

                          I may be accepted for the WTY test since I am one of the few from Ireland who has been tested.The only thing is I would like to keep the results private.Is that possible?
                          See slide #7 for the goals of the project. You'll note some reference to public and private choice, as well as the preference for "public groups of well selected individuals":

                          http://www.dna-fingerprint.com/stati...lkThroughY.pdf

                          I don't know what the selection criteria are in terms of any "quirks" in a candidate's haplotype and SNP tests already taken, nor whether they are still accepting applications.

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                          • #58
                            I have tested with FTDNA .I am U106 and negative for L48 and three other subgroups as well.On my haplotree page there aren't any other tests available. There aren't many people from Ireland with Irish names within that group at the moment. Perhaps a lot of people that have tested already, haven't been deep clade tested.
                            I am not taking any more tests until I find someone with the same haplotype.

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                            • #59
                              Originally posted by lgmayka View Post
                              Unless FTDNA quietly begins to include M458 in the R1a Deep Clade, the answer is no. The R1a Deep Clade is essentially worthless except in very rare cases.

                              M458 is fairly common in Eastern Europe, particularly the West Slavic countries, but it is ordered through the Advanced menu, not the Deep Clade.

                              If you create a Ysearch entry with your marker values, we can give you more specific advice.

                              4RY4G

                              and i am an east slavic, not west.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                When I do a deep clade test, will I receive results (which mutation and how many) or just my haplogroup?

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