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Resolving J1 Haplogroup with family name Hatfield

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Chap View Post
    Thanks Vinnie, but this is where I begin to wonder if you're still speaking English. I'm still trying to make sense of all the letters and numbers used in this nomenclature. How does L222.2 fit into the DYS graph I have? Is it a DYS number or an allele? What do the plus and minus represent? Will this all make more sense to me when I receive the results of the Deep Clade test?

    My degree is in electronics, not biology. Is there a link to an easy to comprehend explanation of the terminology?

    Thanks again for your knowledge and generosity.
    Chap,

    SNPs determine haplogroups (for example, J1 and J2) and subclades within haplogroups (for example, J1b and J1e), and these are different from DYS markers. IMO, it's not much good to compare haplotypes unless you know both your and the other person's haplogroup and subclade because people with similar sets of DYS markers can belong to different subclades and sometimes even to different haplogroups. (This is up to a certain point and depending on the haplogroup; the more markers there are to compare, and the more similarity between the haplotypes, the less likely they will belong to different haplogroups/subclades). If you check out the J1 results in the J Project, you'll see that a number of the haplotypes are very similar, but belong to different subclades. This means that although two haplotypes may be similar, if they belong to different subclades, they're not as closely related as persons with differing haplotypes who are within the same subclade. So SNPs take precedence over DYS values. That's why you need to be cautiously optimistic when you find a similar haplotype in databases such as ySearch, as your degree of relationship will be tenuous unless you both know your subclades. However, if you find a very close match, for example a 65/67 match, then you should be related within a genealogic time frame and you should be in the same haplogroup and subclade. For basic answers to a lot of questions, choose "FAQ" at the top of the FTDNA homepage.

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    • #32
      Thanks to Andrew Lancaster of Double-Helix (E-M35) for this very interesting link comparing J1 with other haplogroups found around the Mediterranean and Middle East. IMO, this is evidence for a neolithic expansion in Europe of J2, but later historical events for J1.

      http://www.haplozone.net/wiki/index....al._%282009%29
      Last edited by vinnie; 19 January 2010, 12:01 PM.

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      • #33
        Hello again everyone.

        I just received the results of my Deep Clade test, and it confirms that I am of Haplogroup J1e [P58+].

        That's interesting for me, but can anyone please offer some assistance as to how that can help me resolve a surname that seems to indicate an ancestry in England?

        I liked the idea previously suggested that my ancestor may have accompanied the Roman garrisons into Britannia, but does that theory still hold water with the confirmation of J1e?

        Thanks as always.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Chap View Post
          Hello again everyone.

          I just received the results of my Deep Clade test, and it confirms that I am of Haplogroup J1e [P58+].

          That's interesting for me, but can anyone please offer some assistance as to how that can help me resolve a surname that seems to indicate an ancestry in England?

          I liked the idea previously suggested that my ancestor may have accompanied the Roman garrisons into Britannia, but does that theory still hold water with the confirmation of J1e?

          Thanks as always.
          Sure. If your known ancestry is English and you're J1*, your ancestors could have come with the Romans, or maybe during the Neolithic, nobody knows yet. Keep looking in all the databases for good strong matches.

          Regards,
          Jim

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          • #35
            Hello,

            My guess would be Roman mercenaries. Especially Syrian Bowmen in Roman service and other Ethnic groups from the Middle East.

            Syrian Bowmen in Britain
            http://www.romanarmy.net/hamians.htm

            Also other Middle Eastern mercenaries were present in Britain, see Arbeia "fort of the Arab troops"a Roman fort in South Shields, Tyne & Wear, England.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arbeia

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