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  • Autosomal Testing question

    I would like to know if females and take the Autosomal test? If so, which one as there are many different options. I guess what I'm looking for is who takes that test and what would they hope to get out of it. I had someone recommend that I take this test. Not sure if I should but would like someone to explain the reasons behind Autosomal, etc.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by Carolyn1955 View Post
    I would like to know if females and take the Autosomal test? If so, which one as there are many different options. I guess what I'm looking for is who takes that test and what would they hope to get out of it. I had someone recommend that I take this test. Not sure if I should but would like someone to explain the reasons behind Autosomal, etc.

    Thanks
    Yes, women can take autosomal DNA tests.

    Autosomal testing by DNATribes is intended to reveal deep ancestry. But if a person has a very mixed background, the results can be unclear. People who know their background test with DNATribes for reasons I don't understand.

    Autosomal testing by 23andMe reveals deep and sometimes recent ancestry, and also health traits. Last week 23andMe began selling those types of tests separately or in combination, as you wish.

    If you do not already have a research goal which these tests support, you probably don't need them.

    Regards,
    Jim

    Comment


    • #3
      Since FTDNA also offers the Autosomal tesing for complex kinship testing (ex. sister siblingship test), etc. Would I order this for my sister and me or does she have to have some other test first. I have already had my FGS done, now, she and I would like to confirm kinship but not necessarily have her take the full genome sequence, etc. Is this possible?

      Since there is a remote possibility that we may not be sisters, we are looking for the simplest way to test for this purpose. She is not interested in all the other testing if they are not needed.



      Originally posted by Jim Honeychuck View Post
      Yes, women can take autosomal DNA tests.

      Autosomal testing by DNATribes is intended to reveal deep ancestry. But if a person has a very mixed background, the results can be unclear. People who know their background test with DNATribes for reasons I don't understand.

      Autosomal testing by 23andMe reveals deep and sometimes recent ancestry, and also health traits. Last week 23andMe began selling those types of tests separately or in combination, as you wish.

      If you do not already have a research goal which these tests support, you probably don't need them.

      Regards,
      Jim

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Carolyn1955 View Post
        Since FTDNA also offers the Autosomal tesing for complex kinship testing (ex. sister siblingship test), etc. Would I order this for my sister and me or does she have to have some other test first. I have already had my FGS done, now, she and I would like to confirm kinship but not necessarily have her take the full genome sequence, etc. Is this possible?
        ...
        In other threads you seem to imply you have taken the 23andMe test. If your sister also takes the 23andMe test you will be able to determine sistership (or lack thereof) by comparing your 23andMe results.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Carolyn.

          If you think you are adopted or that you and your sister don't have the same biological mother, and you already know your mtdna, then ask your sister to test her mtdna. She can do the basic mtdna thru the Genographic Project or FTDNA. That test will reveal the basic haplogroup and HVR1. If she has a different haplogroup, then the two of you have different mothers. If her haplogroup is the same as yours, but the HVR1 isn't the same as yours, then you have different mothers. If you two match exactly on that, she can upgrade to a HVR2 or FGS. If she is in a different subclade and/or has different HVR2 mutations, then you have different moms. You can email FTDNA to ask if they have some other way to test for siblingship.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks, I did go ahead and write FTDNA about options for the two of us. I signed up at 23andme but did not order any of their kits as of today. I'd rather order from FTDNA since it's the same company as I had my tests done through and would be much more affordable and easier to compare results.

            Some background information, so that I won't sound to much like an idiot on this forum:

            I am the only one in my family that does not look Native American. I do not have their black hair, nor very dark reddish brown skin, nor the check bones or nose ridge that they have. Since I turned out as a U8a1, I believe this rules out the Native American in general, then factor in the blonde hair, blue eyes, freckles and fair skinned and you have me.

            My mother is over 80 years old and I lost my father back when I was 17. My father told me when I was about 7 that the reason I looked so different than the rest of my family was that there were two baby girls born the same week, mom's died and the nurse switched babies because the other one was born to a single mom. My mother will not discuss this with me as it brings painful memories to her, so that is a dead end there. My only real course of action is through DNA.

            So, even if we find out that we are not biological sisters, is of no real consequence since we've both felt we were most likely not anyway, we're still best friends and always will be.

            I just wanted to make sure I ordered her the right kit so we don't go around in circles with more and more tests to determine what we most likely already know. We both just want to solve the riddle so to speak.

            I am now waiting to here from FTDNA for the best recourse.
            Thanks all for replying to this thread!






            Originally posted by ~Elizabeth~ View Post
            Hi Carolyn.

            If you think you are adopted or that you and your sister don't have the same biological mother, and you already know your mtdna, then ask your sister to test her mtdna. She can do the basic mtdna thru the Genographic Project or FTDNA. That test will reveal the basic haplogroup and HVR1. If she has a different haplogroup, then the two of you have different mothers. If her haplogroup is the same as yours, but the HVR1 isn't the same as yours, then you have different mothers. If you two match exactly on that, she can upgrade to a HVR2 or FGS. If she is in a different subclade and/or has different HVR2 mutations, then you have different moms. You can email FTDNA to ask if they have some other way to test for siblingship.
            Last edited by Carolyn1955; 22nd November 2009, 11:36 AM. Reason: spelling correction

            Comment


            • #7
              Hi Carolyn. Thank you for sharing. Wait for FTDNA's reply/advice before ordering a dna test for your sister. Should be sometime Monday.
              If there isn't another type of test for siblingship, then I guess FTDNA would say the basic haplogroup test is the best. It may be the only test your sister needs, to determine biological sisterhood.

              If the issue was that you think you have different fathers, but the same mother, then an Xdna test would help with that. A man has only one X to pass on to daughters. Every female child a man fathers will have that X. So if I ever come across my lost older half-sister, born in South Carolina, that my father also abandoned, we could have our Xdna. I have at least two younger half-brothers that I know of. One my father raised, the other was given up for adoption in Texas. Then who knows how many left behind in Vietnam.
              I am my mothers only child.
              Years ago I met the one my father raised. I don't know the names of the other ones.
              Last edited by ~Elizabeth~; 22nd November 2009, 06:24 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                I realize my situation may sound almost fairy tale! I assure you it is not. I didn't even believe my father when he told me my real birth situation. But, years after he passed away, when I was only 17, a family friend called me on her dying bed. She said she could not rest in peace with out at least telling me what my mother had told her. 20 years later at over 80 years old, she keeps her silence.

                Our dear family friend told me a nurse named M. Robeson told my father it was okay if his daughter didn't make it. She could solve the problem. Since my mother was very ill and birthing her baby put her in a situation that she was kept asleep for almost 8 days was ok. It would work. These were midwives in Eastern Kentucky in 1955 and how they practiced nursing daily in the hills of Eastern Kentucky.

                My mother according to our mutual family friend, said she held her baby, then was so ill they allowed her to sleep for over a week. When she awoke, she held a different baby girl. The difference were that my parents were very Native American in features, she held a baby girl with light skin, blue eyes and blonde hair. That was most difficult for her since I was her 3rd child and the other two were very much Native American in looks and features, after my birth, the rest look the same her her and my father. She went on to give birth to 5 more children with only one of eight looking more Swedish or Finnish, etc. Thus, the U8a1 haplogroup I am in.

                When our family friend became obviously very ill, she did not want to keep anything in her heart that did not make her feel good about herself nor pass on with secrets she could not live nor die with. She called me and told me the same story my father had told me back when I was of grade school age.

                Now that my Mother is over 80 and my father died over 26 years ago, I really don't want to open up old wounds for her, yet, I still want to know the truth. So, one of my sisters has agreed to help me find out.

                We have not told our mother of my quest. I chose to do the Full Genome Sequence to have a large background to work with. The next step is to find out if a sibling matches, if not, I will at least have something more to work with.

                Since I am writing a book about my families Melungeon/Native American/African, etc. titled, "Living Memories", I want to tie in my own birth to those I have researched for over 35 years. So far, it looks like I may have gave them their ancestors while not ever really understanding mine. The book will still be published regardless of the end result...

                Thanks




                Originally posted by ~Elizabeth~ View Post
                Hi Carolyn. Thank you for sharing. Wait for FTDNA's reply/advice before ordering a dna test for your sister. Should be sometime Monday.
                If there isn't another type of test for siblingship, then I guess FTDNA would say the basic haplogroup test is the best. It may be the only test your sister needs, to determine biological sisterhood.

                If the issue was that you think you have different fathers, but the same mother, then an Xdna test would help with that. A man has only one X to pass on to daughters. Every female child a man fathers will have that X. So if I ever come across my lost older half-sister, born in South Carolina, that my father also abandoned, we could have our Xdna. I have at least two younger half-brothers that I know of. One my father raised, the other was given up for adoption in Texas. Then who knows how many left behind in Vietnam.
                I am my mothers only child.
                Years ago I met the one my father raised. I don't know the names of the other ones.
                Last edited by Carolyn1955; 22nd November 2009, 08:01 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I had to keep from commenting earlier, but I think that was terrible. If the story is true, then I feel sorrow and sympathy for your natural mother whose child was stolen from her. So awful. I wonder what she was told. Was she told her baby died? Did she know her baby was stolen from her? The anguish she must have had her whole life must have been unbearable.
                  It is a sad story.
                  I hope your sister turns out to be your biological sister.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ~Elizabeth~ View Post
                    If the story is true, then I feel sorrow and sympathy for your natural mother whose child was stolen from her. So awful. I wonder what she was told. Was she told her baby died? Did she know her baby was stolen from her? The anguish she must have had her whole life must have been unbearable.
                    Alternatively, the single mother may have not wanted the baby and the nurse was dealing with the situation in the way she thought best -- adoption on the run so to speak. This is not an unknown situation, and probably still happens in some countries.

                    Carolyn: Best of luck with your results.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thank you for your kind words...

                      Switching babies was common practice in Eastern Kentucky back in the 50's and long before then. Mid-wives thought they were doing the right thing, or at least some of them did. There were situations where midwives and nurses took it upon themselves to make God like decisions. Keep in mind, where I was born is in the hills, even travel was difficult.

                      I've known since I was in grade school because that was when my father told me, I'm ok with it. The only reason my father told me was because it was obvious what had happened. Since my parents and all 7 other siblings look very much Native American or some descent other than white, I turned our fair complected, blonde hair and blue eyes. I stood out like a soar thumb.

                      Having a family friend call you up on her death bed many years later and say she can't take that knowledge with her upon her death, and told me my mothers side of the story, I started working on a family tree looking for answer's. Eventually, I had my FGS done if for no other reason than curiosity.

                      I may never know the situation of my birth mother, if in fact it turns out she was different than the mother I have always known. My goal is to simply find out if I am not. Luckily there are 7 more siblings that can be tested. There are 5 more females.

                      Thanks

                      Originally posted by ~Elizabeth~ View Post
                      I had to keep from commenting earlier, but I think that was terrible. If the story is true, then I feel sorrow and sympathy for your natural mother whose child was stolen from her. So awful. I wonder what she was told. Was she told her baby died? Did she know her baby was stolen from her? The anguish she must have had her whole life must have been unbearable.
                      It is a sad story.
                      I hope your sister turns out to be your biological sister.
                      Last edited by Carolyn1955; 23rd November 2009, 11:24 AM. Reason: cleared way to many blank spaces!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is exactly why I had our family DNA tested.
                        Plus some family nut said we were not even part of the family.
                        We all had a 66 of 67 match back thru nine generations..

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by darroll View Post
                          This is exactly why I had our family DNA tested.
                          Plus some family nut said we were not even part of the family.
                          We all had a 66 of 67 match back thru nine generations..
                          It's a good thing you have that ydna match. If you didn't have the match it may have been because a midwife switched babies.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have no matches for ydna because no males in my family have tested. However, the other poster does according to their post. I don't think the other poster was saying anything about a midwife switching at birth.

                            In my situation, it was common practice in the hills of Eastern Kentucky. I don't think I am trying to find my birth mother, I believe that would be nearer to impossible. However, my goal which would be easily obtainable, it to prove the switch took place. Having a sister test is a great start. I'm working on getting that done asap.

                            Thanks

                            Originally posted by ~Elizabeth~ View Post
                            It's a good thing you have that ydna match. If you didn't have the match it may have been because a midwife switched babies.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Carolyn. It's good that you are trying to get the truth. I wish you luck in finding the truth, and I wish you peace with the outcome.

                              If your sister has the same mtdna haplogroup as you, then somewhere along the way along the maternal line was a European woman. If both your parents had a parent or grandparent that was blond and blue, it is possible for them to have a blonde blue eyed child. If you were switched at birth, as your family friend and father told you, then maybe your biological parents lived close by to your adoptive family and are still in Eastern Kentucky.

                              It's good that your sister is helping you in your search for the truth. Count your blessings that your family loves you.

                              Comment

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