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mtDNA FGS matches

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  • mtDNA FGS matches

    I have one exact match for the full genomic sequence on the mitochondrial DNA. The gentleman that matches me is adopted and doesn't know who his birth parents are - just where and when he was born. The problem is, I don't know of any female relatives that were in that location when he was born.

    From what I understand about DNA, having an exact match on the full genomic sequence should mean that we are closely related. Or am I wrong on this?

    Anyone know for sure what an exact FGS mtDNA match means?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Yep,
    You are related somehow.
    Our MTDNA matches my mothers brother. (HVR-2)

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    • #3
      Yes, you do share a common maternal line ancestor with him at some time in the past, but you are not necessarily "closely related," if by that you mean in the last few generations. The common ancestor may have lived thousands of years ago and easily could have lived hundreds of years ago.

      One factor is if the haplogroup and subclade is common or rare. Any of the H haplogroup and most of its subclades are very common, shared by 40-50% of those of European ancestry. Another factor would be if the two of you share a mutation that is rare - that may indicate more recent common ancestry.

      Of course, it's entirely possible that you and he share a common maternal line ancestor in the last few hundred years. However, that will be difficult to establish, since he was adopted.

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      • #4
        Re T2

        I notice that there are quite a few "T2" in the Cumberland Gap Project. And that geographical region would seem to be heavily populated with Scots-Irish-Borderers.

        Oops! I got the wrong person. What is the initial person's mt-haplogroup?
        Last edited by PDHOTLEN; 5 September 2009, 07:50 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by nanrivers View Post
          I have one exact match for the full genomic sequence on the mitochondrial DNA. The gentleman that matches me is adopted and doesn't know who his birth parents are - just where and when he was born. The problem is, I don't know of any female relatives that were in that location when he was born...
          Why not furnish him with a complete account of your matrilineal descent and let him see if he can puzzle-out a connection? You would gain a fuller picture of your extended matrilineal family through time. History not shared is lost.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tomcat View Post
            Why not furnish him with a complete account of your matrilineal descent and let him see if he can puzzle-out a connection? You would gain a fuller picture of your extended matrilineal family through time. History not shared is lost.
            I have provided him a lot of information already - but none of it has helped. We have even shared pictures with each other - and quite honestly when I saw his picture I *knew* he was related - too many familiar features. My mother thought the same thing as well. Of course there are differences in looks, but there was enough there to cause us to think he is closely related.

            The haplogroup is H1 which I know is common. But the fact that our full genomic sequence matches exactly (including the 8 differences from CRS that is outside of HVR1 & HVR2) is what makes me think that we are closely related - a common ancestor in the last few generations.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nanrivers View Post
              I have provided him a lot of information already - but none of it has helped. We have even shared pictures with each other - and quite honestly when I saw his picture I *knew* he was related - too many familiar features. My mother thought the same thing as well. Of course there are differences in looks, but there was enough there to cause us to think he is closely related.

              The haplogroup is H1 which I know is common. But the fact that our full genomic sequence matches exactly (including the 8 differences from CRS that is outside of HVR1 & HVR2) is what makes me think that we are closely related - a common ancestor in the last few generations.
              Cool!

              But, insofar as he knows nothing about his maternal genealogy, he obviously can't plug into your's. The work that is called-for, is an accounting-for of all your maternal line relatives and their descendants, through time. The goal is to identify, if possible, a single maternal line descendant of your's who was in the place of his birth, at the time of his birth.

              It is complicated. Someone has to track all of your maternal great aunts, in example, and their daughters and the daughters of those daughters.

              He should do his Y, if he hasn't.

              Once upon a time, and maybe not so long ago, a son of his surnamed Y-line was in the same place as a daughter of your Mt line. And they met, intimately.
              Last edited by tomcat; 7 September 2009, 11:10 PM.

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              • #8
                I also wonder if your adopted match has explored all possibilities of getting at his original birth records? The options for that vary state to state.

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                • #9
                  That's what I'm working on now - trying to trace the women to "modern times" - but it's difficult.

                  It's also made more difficult by him being born in New York City in 1955.

                  Thanks for the input.

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