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Interpreting results

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  • Interpreting results

    I am trying to resolve a question of an ancestor... I have 2 cousins who just recently recieved their 37 marker results, 36 of 37 match...the odd being at marker 570. One is 17 the other is 18. One believes they have the same 3rd great grandpa but the other says no. Is it possible to determine the answer through their results? Their lineage is as follows:
    1. Thomas Gazaway b. abt. 1753
    + Unknown
    2. William Gazaway b: abt. 1775
    + Mary Polly Waggoner
    3. Jesse Gazaway b: 1811
    + Susan Jones
    4. Thomas D Gazaway b:1835
    + Mary Garris
    5. John Rylie Gazaway b:1858
    + Margaret Phillips
    6. Cleve Gazaway b; 1891
    + Maud Moore
    7. Rudolph Cleveland Gazaway b: 1922
    + Martha Taylor
    8. Living Gazaway b: 1941

    1. Thomas Gazaway b. abt. 1753
    + Unknown
    2. William Gazaway b: abt. 1775
    + Mary Polly Waggoner
    3. Thomas Gazaway b: abt 1795
    + Martha Patsey Walker
    4. John W Gazaway b:1829
    + Permelia ???
    5. Rufus Franklin Gazaway b:1868
    + Permelia Anne Bellah
    6. John Martin Gazaway b; 1902
    + Rose Mae Alexander
    7. Cletus Eugene Gazaway b: 1928
    + Grace Brown
    8. Living Gazaway b. 1959

  • #2
    Somebody could be able to attach an actual probability, but I don't think there is enough information - 36 out of 37 is a good match, but you can't really say if it's 3rd, 4th or 10th grandpa. If you go to 67 and find more differences, perhaps this could exclude such a close relationship. But just 1 difference in 37 is not enough (nor would a perfect match necessarily imply it either)

    cacio

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    • #3
      Originally posted by batj View Post
      I am trying to resolve a question of an ancestor... I have 2 cousins who just recently received their 37 marker results, 36 of 37 match...the odd being at marker 570. One is 17 the other is 18. One believes they have the same 3rd great grandpa but the other says no. Is it possible to determine the answer through their results?
      NO! When a mutation occurs father and son will differ on that marker, even if it is the slowest mutating marker in the world. If this father had more than one son one of them might have the mutation and the other one might not so the brothers could differ by that marker.

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