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Mutally Exclusive SNP's?

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  • wmccown
    replied
    Mutually Exclusive SNP's

    Thanks Jim, for your two replies. I am glsd that your take on the deep subclades tests confirms my interpretation of FTDNA's response. I took the first test just to have a tested haplogroup
    with some vague idea that it might help with genealogy. The test was at least a year ago and it was a doozy in terms of which SNP's were positive and which were negative, many more than the seven SNP add on. At the time, it passed through my mind that it would be nice to have the same haplogroup as Niall of the Nine Hostages. That wasn't to be, but there are lots of great people in R1b1b2.

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  • Jim Barrett
    replied
    Originally posted by wmccown View Post
    One reason that I have delayed is that I enchanged emails with FTDNA and got the impression that all of the letters and numbers to the right of the basic R1b1b2 would be more useful for ancient information than for genealogical information within a historical time span. Also, they left the impression that all of my highest matches would have exactly the same suffix to my haplogroup as I would if tested to the same SNP's.
    I believe you receive the correct impression. I also know there are those who disagree with that idea, but they have never made it clear to me why they disagree.

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  • Jim Barrett
    replied
    Originally posted by wmccown View Post
    Is it possible that no matter how many new SNP's are discovered and I am tested for, that I could remain R1b1b2?
    Yes, if you test negative for all of the new SNP's you'll stay R1b1b2, unless they decide to rename our sub clade.

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  • wmccown
    replied
    Mutually Exclusive SNP's

    Hi Elise, I was confused and gave some of your deserved credit to Tim Peterman. Many thanks for your insights and response.

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  • wmccown
    replied
    Mutually Exclusive SNP's

    Hi Tim, Thanks very much for both of your replies to the thread.
    They are very clear and easy to understand and I am tempted to take the offered SNP tests. One reason that I have delayed is that I enchanged emails with FTDNA and got the impression that all of the letters and numbers to the right of the basic R1b1b2
    would be more useful for ancient information than for genealogical information within a historical time span. Also, they left the impression that all of my highest matches would have exactly the same suffix to my haplogroup as I would if tested to the same SNP's.

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  • T E Peterman
    replied
    William,

    You may recall that you have a high resolution match with my cousin, John I. Wilson, and that your McCown family was geographically associated with my Wilson family in Virginia and Kentucky.

    I upgraded John I. Wilson's results and he is L21+. My armchair guess is that you will be L21+ also. It would be nice to know for sure.

    For your page to list all of those L's and P's, it means you haven't upgraded since Family Tree DNA determined that you are M269+.

    Unless we are looking at some sort of biological fluke, you will be found L23+, L49+, L11+, P310+, P311+, P312+, and finally L21+. You will see this on your haplotree page.

    A few months ago, you could have taken the L21 test as a standalone for $29.

    Timothy Peterman

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  • efgen
    replied
    Those are all relatively new SNPs that were discovered and placed on the tree in the past year and FTDNA is now offering to test them. They are not mutually exclusive of your M269/R1b1b2 -- they define new subclades (subgroups) of R1b1b2. Whether you, personally, happen to be in any of these subclades can only be determined by testing them.

    Before these new SNPs were discovered, many of the R1b1b2 guys were stuck in your situation, only being R1b1b2, and not in any known subclade. But since these new SNPs have been discovered, most of those people are now finding that they are indeed in the new subclades. Yes, there are some people who have still remained just R1b1b2 even after testing all these new SNPs -- but those people are most definitely in the minority now.

    The best way to understand how all these SNPs are related to each other is to look at the R tree. You can see it on your Haplotree page -- click the R to expand the full tree. You'll see which SNPs you've already tested negative for in the tree, and which SNPs are now available for you to test. You can also view the full R tree here:

    http://www.familytreedna.com/img/snp...plogroup-R.jpg

    Elise

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  • wmccown
    started a topic Mutally Exclusive SNP's?

    Mutally Exclusive SNP's?

    My haplogroup was confirmed by a deep subclad test. Since then, FTDNA says that I am eligible to test for the following: L11, L21, L23, L49, P310, P311, P312, all for the special price of $59.

    From what I have read in the forum, it sounds as though while all of those SNP tests may be available, it seems at first glance to me that some of the L's go with some of the P's. Also, it sounds as if it is possible for the tests to show no change whatsoever in my R1b1b2 haplogroup. That is exactly what happened during my deep subclade test. It simply confirmed my pre test R1b1b2.

    Is it possible that no matter how many new SNP's are discovered and I am tested for, that I could remain R1b1b2?
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