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TV series on the DNA of Western Isles of Scotland

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Jim Honeychuck View Post
    "Hello" is on a banner ad for downloading smilies. Turn the sound off before you use whatever site that is.

    Regards,
    Jim

    I was wondering about that. I haven't had a "hello" from my computer, but I almost always use my computer with the sound muted. Every time I clicked on something I would hear a click sound. It was annoying. Much better silent. Once in a while I would get startled by an ad/banner/popup that had audio, but not anymore. I always make sure I'm muted before I open the browser. If I wanna hear music from youtube, I'll put the sound on.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Deirwha View Post
      one of the many aspects of life across the pond I love. What we get here are BBC programs packaged for their appeal to the tastes of US audiences. I would not have given up my tv if we had access to programs like Mister Maestro and the weekly unraveling of the the genealogy of a celebrity or the consistent Time Team programs. Several others I found appealing, although I must admit I am not into the dance craze that seems to have everyone. In short, I doubt we would get the program you describe, although the History Channel did some of the the Time Team programs. Loved them.
      Have you tried the Channel 4 AUDIO CONTENT from news.bbc.co.uk? There is wealth of talks etc on archeology , history, ethnology etc I find I absorb more facts from the non-visual source but soak up more understanding from the audiovisual.Good hunting!

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      • #33
        bits and pieces

        thanks, Jim, I wasn't aware of a smiley ad on any of the webpages I had up, but that makes sense. I don't mind the clicking noise, and don't go to many sites that make noise-exc ept the Nova Scotia miner's website, which I love the music on. girl's got PIPES!

        I succeeded in finding a bit more regarding the McAuley's through the NS vital records and 1901 and 1911 census indexes online. nothing earthshattering, but every little bit helps. I also think I found a great grand uncle Archibald McDonald. can't prove it, yet. everything fits, though. right names, right areas, right time frame, right occupation. so maybe. but I can't find some folks because their vitals fall into the void area. the site gives caveat's that Catholic's tended not to register their vitals, but my folk were Presbytarians. still, a lot of records are missing.

        so far I've only been in contact with a couple relatives, one in question (two identical couples, one might be mine, which one?) and one descended from the McPhails who refused to tell me who they descended from. nothing from the Clans, so far.

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        • #34
          Roots list

          for those of us with Cape Breton roots, there's a list at Rootsweb that seems neglected to me. [email protected]. don't know if it will help, but maybe...

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          • #35
            Originally posted by derinos View Post
            Have you tried the Channel 4 AUDIO CONTENT from news.bbc.co.uk? There is wealth of talks etc on archeology , history, ethnology etc I find I absorb more facts from the non-visual source but soak up more understanding from the audiovisual.Good hunting!
            There is a lot of DNA stuff on youtube


            Also Archaeology http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...chaeology&aq=f

            Ancient Warfare http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...t+warfare&aq=f

            The list goes on..and on
            Last edited by M.O'Connor; 17 February 2009, 01:13 AM.

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            • #36
              I enjoyed the Ancient Warriors Series
              http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...+warriors&aq=f

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              • #37
                Originally posted by nekocat View Post
                thanks, Jim, I wasn't aware of a smiley ad on any of the webpages I had up, but that makes sense. I don't mind the clicking noise, and don't go to many sites that make noise-exc ept the Nova Scotia miner's website, which I love the music on. girl's got PIPES!

                I succeeded in finding a bit more regarding the McAuley's through the NS vital records and 1901 and 1911 census indexes online. nothing earthshattering, but every little bit helps. I also think I found a great grand uncle Archibald McDonald. can't prove it, yet. everything fits, though. right names, right areas, right time frame, right occupation. so maybe. but I can't find some folks because their vitals fall into the void area. the site gives caveat's that Catholic's tended not to register their vitals, but my folk were Presbytarians. still, a lot of records are missing.

                so far I've only been in contact with a couple relatives, one in question (two identical couples, one might be mine, which one?) and one descended from the McPhails who refused to tell me who they descended from. nothing from the Clans, so far.
                My "folks" were Presbyterian as well. Although the first one to arrive in Canada is a bit of an elusive one.... but we are closer to finding his roots in Scotland then ever before! After a long time of searching and finding fraudulent dates and finding the real more accurate dates, etc.

                Although My folks aren't from Cape Breton (as far as I know), mine were from Colchester, Cumberland and Pictou. All three, moving from one to the other.

                Good luck in your searches

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                • #38
                  I'm jazzed...

                  someone on the Cape Breton list sent me some history on my McPhails. I'd always had the general picture, that they'd settled in River Dennis. as usual, my ancestors talked of the better known nearby town instead of the one they really settled in. so now I know that they lived at McPhail's Glen, they moved from Harris to N. Uist before coming to NS.
                  it doesn't sound like much, but I've always found that knowing where a person lives is about 80% of the battle of finding records for them. if records exist, that is. with NS, it's hit and miss...

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                  • #39
                    Closing summary by Dr. Jim Wilson at the end of this series. Don't ask me to elaborate. All I've done is transcribe.

                    "It's actually been really exciting for me; it's the first time we've used high resolution data to look at the history of Scotland."

                    "One of the major things was seeing how different the eastern sample was from our samples from the islands." [The eastern sample was from Moray, a presumably non-Celtic population used as a control in the study]

                    "The sample from Moray had a much larger signal of origins from the North Sea, from the continent, from Denmark, the Anglo-Saxons, and perhaps the eastern seaboard that always faced the continent, which was not seen too much in our island samples."

                    "The second thing that was quite interesting was the difference in Norse input. Islay, Lewis and Harris were almost a quarter Norse in their male lineages. That's quite a lot. So some of these people were right in their insistence on being Vikings."

                    "But not in Skye, only 4%, so very, very few had a Norse male lineage. I don't know why that difference arose, but it's definitely real."

                    "The other thing, and maybe the most unexpected for me, was the signal of an enormous Irish input to all the samples, even all the way across to Moray." [Among the volunteer subjects was one with Y-DNA typical of Munster and another with the Y-DNA signature of Niall of the Nine Hostages]

                    "This occupied over a third of all the ancestral lineages in these places, and I think this is too much to simply be due to the supposed Gaelic movement around Dalriadic times. And I wonder if this movement has been happening over a longer time period, from Ireland to Scotland."

                    "The funny thing is that we don't see the opposite. We don't see the indigenous Scottish types in Ireland. This has been a one-way movement, for one reason or another, over time."

                    "The other thing I should draw out is that all populations also had this indigenous north British element that would be shared with the Picts and was found across all the populations but enormously high in Skye, where it stood out from the others."

                    "So those were the main conclusions."

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                    • #40
                      http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/...ds/7976510.stm

                      Clues to ancient invasion in DNA

                      Scientific evidence of an ancient invasion of Scotland from Ireland may have been uncovered by DNA techniques.

                      Researchers from Edinburgh University said studies of Scots living on Islay, Lewis, Harris and Skye were found to have strong links with Irish people.

                      Early historical sources recount how the Gaels came from Ireland about 500 AD and conquered the Picts in Argyll.

                      Scientists said the study was the first demonstration of a significant Irish genetics component in Scots' ancestry.

                      The research, which features work by geneticist Dr Jim Wilson, a specialist in population genetics, is being featured in programmes on Gaelic television channel BBC Alba.

                      The study also suggests intriguing ancestry of Scots living on the Western Isles and in the north and north east of Scotland.

                      Trading networks

                      Dr Wilson said: "It was extremely exciting to see for the first time the ancient genetic connection between Scotland and Ireland - the signature of a movement of people from Ireland to Scotland, perhaps of the Scots or Gaels themselves."

                      The origin of the Gaels - who by conquering and integrating with Pictish northern tribes created the Kingdom of Alba - has been debated by historians for centuries.

                      The earliest historical source comes from around the 10th Century and relates that the Gaels came from Ireland in about 500 AD, under King Fergus Mor.

                      However, more recently archaeologists have suggested the Gaels had lived in Argyll for centuries before Fergus Mor's invasion.

                      The study also suggested an east-west genetic divide seen in England and attributed to Anglo-Saxons and Danes was evident in the north of Scotland.

                      This was noted in places far from Anglo-Saxon and Danish settlements, indicating that this division was older and may have arisen in the Bronze Age through trading networks across the North Sea.

                      Geneticists also said as many as 40% of the population on the Western Isles could have Viking ancestry, while no Viking ancestry was found in north east Scotland.

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