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    I will try to post again as the last did not take. I am new to this subject and reading with interest the postings.
    My interest is to learn of my ethnic background, migratory routes, if possible, and see if I fall into any Haplogroup. I am not comparing genes with anyone at this time.

    For information: My father and only sibling, a brother, passed away, leaving only me and mother. My father's sister survives at 92 years old; all other siblings of my parents are gone. I have one daughter and my brother leaves three daughters and a son.

    1. As I understand, that as a male, I can have a YDNA and a mtDNA test conducted giving me the male markers on my fathers side and female line on my mother's side. If this is true then is there any reason or advantage to have my mother tested since she obviously does not have a Y chromosome and the mtDNA test will have already been tested through me?

    2. My paternal grandmother said that we had American Indian ancestery through her line. I would like to know if that is true and could trace the maternal line through my only living aunt or her daughters. However, the males from my paternal great grandfather have died out. Would I have to find a male sibling of this paternal great grandfather and locate a direct male line to have tested for the YDNA?

    Hope this is not too confusing and appreciate any reponses.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Dalbert
    I will try to post again as the last did not take. I am new to this subject and reading with interest the postings.
    My interest is to learn of my ethnic background, migratory routes, if possible, and see if I fall into any Haplogroup. I am not comparing genes with anyone at this time.

    For information: My father and only sibling, a brother, passed away, leaving only me and mother. My father's sister survives at 92 years old; all other siblings of my parents are gone. I have one daughter and my brother leaves three daughters and a son.

    1. As I understand, that as a male, I can have a YDNA and a mtDNA test conducted giving me the male markers on my fathers side and female line on my mother's side. If this is true then is there any reason or advantage to have my mother tested since she obviously does not have a Y chromosome and the mtDNA test will have already been tested through me?

    2. My paternal grandmother said that we had American Indian ancestery through her line. I would like to know if that is true and could trace the maternal line through my only living aunt or her daughters. However, the males from my paternal great grandfather have died out. Would I have to find a male sibling of this paternal great grandfather and locate a direct male line to have tested for the YDNA?

    Hope this is not too confusing and appreciate any reponses.

    Hi Dalbert,

    Do bear in mind that your DNA results won't necessarily give you specific details/indications of specific ethnic background. Sometimes they will, and sometimes they won't.....Its is all very interesting nonetheless.

    1) You are correct, - Y-DNA follows the direct male line, Mt-DNA follows the direct female line. You are correct in thinking that your mothers mtDNA is identical to yours, therefore there is no advantage in testing hers also.
    2) You are correct (on both counts). Also, if the results that come back suggest no native american ancestry, - it might just mean that the native american ancesty (if your paternal grandmother is correct), wasn't on either her direct paternal or maternal lines.

    Angela.

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    • #3
      Thanks

      Originally posted by AngelaCP
      Hi Dalbert,

      Do bear in mind that your DNA results won't necessarily give you specific details/indications of specific ethnic background. Sometimes they will, and sometimes they won't.....Its is all very interesting nonetheless.

      1) You are correct, - Y-DNA follows the direct male line, Mt-DNA follows the direct female line. You are correct in thinking that your mothers mtDNA is identical to yours, therefore there is no advantage in testing hers also.
      2) You are correct (on both counts). Also, if the results that come back suggest no native american ancestry, - it might just mean that the native american ancesty (if your paternal grandmother is correct), wasn't on either her direct paternal or maternal lines.

      Angela.
      Angela, a late thank you for your answer to my questions. It is appreciated!

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a very similar situation. Our family who has been doing genealogy since the early 50's has not been able to go past this one partictular woman or to connect with anyone who has her in their colateral lines. According to family lore, we have Native American ancestry through her. Dad is in a direct maternal line with this woman, which means his mtDNA, is the same as/came from her. A couple of months ago we had Dad's mt and y DNA tested and it answered one part of our genealogy puzzle. Dad's strick maternal line is NOT Native American. Now, that doesn't mean that our femal brickwall wasn't part Native American because her Native American ancestry could have come through her paternal line. In order to test the theory that the Native American ancestry came through her father or her father's paternal line, we would need to find a direct male descendent of her brother. But wait, Native American blood could have come from her paternal grandmother and in that case we would need to find a female descendent of her father's sister. That same type of reasoning goes for each generation.

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