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DNAPrint vs. decodeme vs. 23andme

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  • Fannie
    replied
    Originally posted by Maria_W View Post
    Well since the price of 23andme went down I have decided to contradict myself and order it...I should just stop protesting because I know that I am not going to quite testing! I have this need to know myself and my family in detail. Plus I am getting an emotional payoff! It just makes me feel good!

    Maria
    I'm with you, Maria. I've got the need to know, too, and it DOES feel good! Also, it's all soooo interesting!!
    Fannie

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  • Maria_W
    replied
    DNA Print closing...

    Maybe in the future when the economy changes for the better they will come back with some refinements on their tests... Hope everyone received what they payed for...and the people that worked there can find new jobs...

    Maria

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  • Maria_W
    replied
    Contradicting myself...

    Well since the price of 23andme went down I have decided to contradict myself and order it...I should just stop protesting because I know that I am not going to quite testing! I have this need to know myself and my family in detail. Plus I am getting an emotional payoff! It just makes me feel good!

    Maria

    Leave a comment:


  • Fannie
    replied
    With a 99% genetic makeup of humans being identical, why would anyone expect to be 100% of any particular ethnicity? It seems clear to me that it would be expected that every one is more likely (certain?) to have residual evidence of a 99% commonality in human DNA than not. We may have paper trails for the more recent 1,000 years showing a one country "origin". That, however, is not the human history of the past through all the various migration periods in human history!
    It appears that DecodeMe is equipped to detect the long past common histories reflected in all of our DNA, way past our paper trails and family oral histories. No European nor Native American, for that fact, suddenly appeared without a past common history of origins in his/her veins. That does not appear to me to be credible.
    ruth22

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  • rainbow
    replied
    Originally posted by Maria_W View Post
    Went to Rootsweb dna and genealogy forum and it had the following posting for DNA Print Genomics dated Feb 16, 2009
    "DNA Print Genomics, Inc. has regrettably ceased operations. We thank you for your support. "
    Due to the recession? So no more test for now. Hope everyone who tested with them recieves their results! Feel sorry for those who got layed off...

    Maria


    I read about it in another thread here in this forum. I still can't believe they closed. I know I griped a lot about my results, 2 1/2...almost 3... years after I tested I still don't know where my 17% is from, but I always thought the company was important and doing good work. I am sad they closed up shop. Where are all their scientists and workers gonna go now?
    I hope the Genographic Project or other dna companies hire them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maria_W
    replied
    DNA Print Genomics ceased operations...

    Went to Rootsweb dna and genealogy forum and it had the following posting for DNA Print Genomics dated Feb 16, 2009
    "DNA Print Genomics, Inc. has regrettably ceased operations. We thank you for your support. "
    Due to the recession? So no more test for now. Hope everyone who tested with them recieves their results! Feel sorry for those who got layed off...

    Maria

    Leave a comment:


  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    tidbit re Brazil's Native Americans (BBC)

    I just saw this when I was browsing BBC:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7774895.stm

    I hope the Natives win.

    Leave a comment:


  • rainbow
    replied
    I'm glad you liked the links.

    I hope I never take an airboat ride. The airboat ride is thru a swamp filled with alligators or crocodiles and big watersnakes.
    Once on the news there was a story about people getting stranded on an airboat ride. They were there for a long time (overnight?) and were rescued (they were fine).
    Last edited by rainbow; 10 December 2008, 08:33 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    that was interesting (Rainbow's links)

    I only spent a year in the Miami area (1978/79). I stopped at the Miccosukee tourist traps along the Tamiami Trail a couple of times. Once was to show some visitors from Connecticut some real live Indians. Another time I stopped in their restaurant. I remember being disappointed that I wasn't served by Indian maidens, instead of a garden variety of a white "cracker", ha ha. (I was mostly interested in bird watching in the area.) They offer airboat rides, which unfortunately I didn't take advantage of.

    I don't know how the Tequestas or anyone else could tolerate the mosquitos and "no-see-ums" along the shores of Biscayne Bay in the summer. But caucasians (reputedly) literally have thinner skins than other "races."

    Leave a comment:


  • purple flowers
    replied
    Originally posted by derinos
    There is report that Wahunsunacough was part Florida Seminole, brought North by his dad, and had experienced Spanish culture in Florida. There seem to be some Powhatan language inserts from Spanish.
    The word "Maracca" comes from there and is listed in the colonists' Powhatan Algonkian language lexicon as meaning "Apple". "Poco", Spanish for small, lesser, used also for undesirable, bad or inferior is another such Akgonkian word. The word for the guns of the colonists "poco-sack" implies "bad-cut". Algonkian "Matcher" (Hispanic "manger") is eating.
    I guess south Carolina isn't to far from Florida.. do you know where, he retired? I once read that. I thought
    it was a tribe just a bit south in VA. but maybe not.. I can't find it now.
    and like rainbow says they sure could travel with the weather also.
    but that doesn't prove or disprove he was a descendant of Spaniards.
    I think that there is alot more words that are similar to that side of the pond and it is from ancient times, not post Columbus. just the amounts of recorded history saying many of the tribes spoke something very similar to welsh and semitic languages alone, is just too common. any sea people, and people who traded with sea people.. who intermarried with some sea people... in the MED who came from here or there would also share words or concepts that should have shown links, and proved what they said all along.. that someof them came from that side. .
    I think there just was just lots more sharing of everything than they will admit anyway . especially if turtle Island moved west during one of the world wide recorded events.

    Leave a comment:


  • rainbow
    replied
    Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
    I recall a museum diorama in Miami, showing a couple of Indians in the wild south Florida setting before the coming of Europeans. I imagine they were supposed to be Tequestas, and were probably labeled as such. They probably lived mostly along the Cutler Ridge; the limestone eastern rim of the Everglades that is the most expensive real estate in south Florida.

    R1a1 & U5b2
    Here is a map of Florida showing where the Tequesta lived.
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...sta-tribe2.PNG

    It's from wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tequesta


    I think the Miccosukee have a museum, and hotel/resort, and casino, and golf course.

    About the same as the Seminoles, I think.

    The Seminole tribe owns all the Hard Rock Cafes (?) in the world.
    They bought the whole chain two years ago.
    I googled a link about it. http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P2-2785322.html

    I've never been to a casino.
    I buy the occasional lotto ticket. I've tried scratch-offs. Never won anything.
    I was once given a gift of $35 worth of scratch-offs. Didn't win anything. (Won a couple of free tickets that lost).
    I remember winning a quilt at a raffle once (free raffle ticket). That was my lucky day.

    Leave a comment:


  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    RE Tequesta tribe

    I recall a museum diorama in Miami, showing a couple of Indians in the wild south Florida setting before the coming of Europeans. I imagine they were supposed to be Tequestas, and were probably labeled as such. They probably lived mostly along the Cutler Ridge; the limestone eastern rim of the Everglades that is the most expensive real estate in south Florida.

    R1a1 & U5b2

    Leave a comment:


  • rainbow
    replied
    Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
    I don''t have any sources at my finger tips. But my impression of the Seminoles is that they are a derivative tribe that broke off from the Creek Tribe in Alabama, Georgia, etc. I read somewhere that the Spanish hired the Seminoles to track down and murder any and every Calusa that they could. The only Calusas that survived were the ones that fled to Cuba.
    There is a tribe in Florida that was originally from Tennessee and they were a part of the Seminoles for a while, but then broke off and are now the Miccosukee..
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miccosukee

    The area I live in today was the homeland of the Tequesta, now extinct as a tribe, supposedly.
    Maybe there are descendants alive today, but not as a tribe.

    Leave a comment:


  • PDHOTLEN
    replied
    Re Seminoles

    I don''t have any sources at my finger tips. But my impression of the Seminoles is that they are a derivative tribe that broke off from the Creek Tribe in Alabama, Georgia, etc. I read somewhere that the Spanish hired the Seminoles to track down and murder any and every Calusa that they could. The only Calusas that survived were the ones that fled to Cuba.

    Leave a comment:


  • derinos
    replied
    Originally posted by rainbow
    I have no proof to back this, it's just my opinion/feeling that, before European colonization, tribes freely migrated and moved around and intermingled a lot all along the east coast. Maybe they went to Florida in the winter.
    There is report that Wahunsunacough was part Florida Seminole, brought North by his dad, and had experienced Spanish culture in Florida. There seem to be some Powhatan language inserts from Spanish.
    The word "Maracca" comes from there and is listed in the colonists' Powhatan Algonkian language lexicon as meaning "Apple". "Poco", Spanish for small, lesser, used also for undesirable, bad or inferior is another such Akgonkian word. The word for the guns of the colonists "poco-sack" implies "bad-cut". Algonkian "Matcher" (Hispanic "manger") is eating.

    Leave a comment:

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