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    is it possible that all mutations in hvr1+hvr2 are thousands of years old?
    or is this the case most of the time etc. ...
    mrh

  • #2
    yes, mutations clocks are in the order of thousands of years. I think I have seen numbers like 20,000 years on average per HVR1 mutation, and 3,000 to 5,000 years for coding region mutations.

    cacio

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    • #3
      thank you for your answer!
      mrh

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mrh
        is it possible that all mutations in hvr1+hvr2 are thousands of years old?
        or is this the case most of the time etc. ...
        mrh
        I have had a full genome scan of my mtDNA. I have private mutations in both the HVR1 and coding regions even though I have been assigned to a very specific haplogroup pretty well at the end of the tree branch. These could have occured at any time in the past. I have not been able to find a single match even in HVR1/2 so I am assuming that the HVR1 is probably fairly recent (based on the fact that the lineage is Scottish and Scots have been among those in greatest numbers to step up to the plate to be tested).
        Perhaps with the next revision of Behar's K charts I will have my own clade

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        • #5
          So I wait...

          I have also had my FGS done and I don't have any matches either. There is a lady who also had her genome done, who matches me for HVR 1 and 2 but no match on the full genome. I have 7 mutations in 1 and 2 and 8 mutations in the coding region. I am H1a1. So....I wait!

          Maria
          Last edited by Maria_W; 26 July 2008, 03:46 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cacio
            yes, mutations clocks are in the order of thousands of years. I think I have seen numbers like 20,000 years on average per HVR1 mutation, and 3,000 to 5,000 years for coding region mutations.

            cacio
            Did you really mean to imply that mutations in the HVR1 region occur less often than in the Coding region?

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            • #7
              Yes, in the sense that there is one mutation every 20,000 years in HVR1 (in the original sense of 16something to 16380 or the like), and one every 3-5000 yrs in the coding region. However, remember that HVR1 is only 3-400 bases long, while the coding region is 15,000+, ie an order of magnitude longer, so one should expect more mutations there. Each single base in HVR is however more likely to mutate than each base in the coding region (that's why it is called hypervariable). In other words, if you want to find the stretch of mtdna that has the largest number of mutations, that is indeed HVR1.

              cacio

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