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Orkney Islanders have Siberian relatives.

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  • Orkney Islanders have Siberian relatives.

    I want to take this test. Anyone have any idea where I may take it?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/mai...iorkney123.xml

  • #2
    Originally posted by Hando
    I want to take this test. Anyone have any idea where I may take it?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/mai...iorkney123.xml
    Ron Scott's website http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb....com/~ncscotts/ has excellent resources relating the deCODEme and 23ANDme tests, both of which include the same reference samples, including Orcadian. Both tests (using the same methodology but the former uses twice the number of autosomal SNPs) will rank your genomic findings in relation to 53 population groups. I would expect that your "closest relatives" would be Japanese and Han Chinese but if you have a grand to spare you can find out the specifics.

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    • #3
      Thanks DKF, I sent you a message.
      Last edited by Hando; 25 May 2008, 02:36 AM.

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      • #4
        http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/mai...iorkney123.xml[/QUOTE]

        ROTF
        way too funny.

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        • #5
          Now the Pakistani and Scottish matches I got from DNA Tribes make more sense. It's kind of interesting that the Orkneyinga saga begins with the words:

          There was a king named Fornjot, he ruled over those lands which are called Finland and Kvenland; that is to the east of that bight of the sea which goes northward to meet Gandvik; that we call the Helsingbight.
          http://www.northvegr.org/lore/orkney/001.php

          According to the saga, descendants of Fornjot, Norr and Gorr, left Kvenland and founded Norway. Earl Ragnvald of Orkney is said to have been a descendant of Gorr.

          Most historians in Finland think that the sagas about kings of Finland are just fairy tales, but who knows.

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          • #6
            The article mentions Yakuts in Siberia. Y-haplogroup N3 is very common among the Yakuts, just like in eastern Finland. Western Finland and northern Scandinavia have less N3, but it's still relatively common. I don't know about Orkney, but I'd imagine N3 is not common there. Still some ancestors of Orkney Islanders could have had Y-hg N3 which still show in their autosomal DNA.

            http://www.springerlink.com/content/r8q81q6151827037/

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            • #7
              Saami connection ?

              http://www.orkneyjar.com/folklore/se...ns/origin3.htm

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Poika
                Very much possible. The Norse seemed to be fond of Saami women, according to sagas. Harald Fairhair even married one:

                http://www.utexas.edu/courses/sami/dieda/hist/early.htm

                Snorri Sturluson's 13th-century history of Norway, the Heimskringla, reports that King Harald Fairhair (ca. 865-933) married a Sami girl, though with unhappy consequences. In the Sagas of the Kings, also written by Snorri, Harald's son, Eirik, met a woman originally from Halogaland, who lived with the Sami to learn witchcraft. Interesting also are the jarls (chieftains) of Lade who claimed to be descendents of a certain Saemingr, whose name could mean "the son of Sami".

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                • #9
                  On the other hand, it may be linked to Y-haplogroup R1a:

                  http://humphreygenealogy.com/DTDNA1.html

                  Haplogroup R1a (Hg3, SRY) R1a is the only haplogroup that can currently be unequivocably linked to a Norse ancestry, specifically to the west coast of Norway. It is virtually unknown in the Celtic regions such as Ireland, and barely makes an appearance in Friesland, but occurs at a relatively high frequency in Norway. Curiously those who have a haplotype within this haplogroup often have fairly close matches in Mongolia, India, Siberia, and Eastern Europe. It is believed that the haplogroup emerged among the Kurgan peoples of the Eurasian Stepes (the Ukraine), where their ancestors had lived during the Last Glacial Maximum. From there they spread north and east.

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                  • #10
                    the Orkney men were one of the largest groups of men to work in the west for a company called " Hudson bay Company" a lot of the constantly employed 5000 workers over many mnay years , took native american women as wives.. how many of these children made it back too Orkney and England Wales and Ireland and any of place the hudson bay workers came from ? then lets throw some native american slavery and the dutch and othersw who slaved into the mix.. so the conection to the "east" could be coming from both directions. it had to have.

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                    • #11
                      re R1a1 & Siberia

                      I already mentioned somewhere else that my Y-haplogroup section on my FTDNA personal web page shows me to be distantly related to Siberians and other Asians (3 & 4 step mutations on the 12 marker stretch). Although my paternal line is from Norway, it's clear that I must just be an outlier of the very large haplogroup R1a1. The domestication of the horse is probably behind the vast geographical spread.

                      R1a1 & U5b2

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                      • #12
                        Here's the native population match map from my latest DNA Tribes update. The strongest matches are in Pakistan, Scotland and Ireland:

                        http://img142.imageshack.us/img142/6324/tribesig3.jpg

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                        • #13
                          A lil Asian in some Brits? If they want too.

                          Originally posted by DKF
                          Ron Scott's website http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb....com/~ncscotts/ has excellent resources relating the deCODEme and 23ANDme tests, both of which include the same reference samples, including Orcadian. Both tests (using the same methodology but the former uses twice the number of autosomal SNPs) will rank your genomic findings in relation to 53 population groups. I would expect that your "closest relatives" would be Japanese and Han Chinese but if you have a grand to spare you can find out the specifics.
                          I would suspect Hando's closest relatives are Asian too,because he's 95% Asian, Duh? But he informed and commented that people on the Brit Island Orkney have some Asian/Siberian ancestry somewhere also, like Hando's people.

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                          • #14
                            I'm R1b1b2*

                            with a couple matches in Siberia, and Uygur(N/W China)

                            R1b1b2 China Uygur (Central Asian origin) 1
                            R1b1b2 China Chinese Muslim (Central Asian Descent) 1

                            Maybe he was R1b1b2 ?

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