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Interesting Article in the LA Times

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  • Interesting Article in the LA Times

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...934,full.story

    I can't paste the story here, it's too long but you can still read it at the above link.

  • #2
    I never heard of that story before. I never read the LA Times before either. I think it's disgusting that the article was sympathetic to him. So what if he is now an old white man who is sick and in a wheelchair. He was a known serial rapist. Then years later DNA evidence caught him and convicted him decades later for killing one of his rape victims. I have no sympathy for him. He is guilty. His lawyer tries to portray him as only a rapist and not a rapist/killer. Give me a break. The victim died from neck wounds similar, but more severe, to the ones he inflicted on his other victims. I don't doubt that he probably had other victims too and those cases are probably still unsolved. I hope they keep using DNA to catch criminals, whether they are now 70, 80, 90, or 100.

    How about posting articles about how DNA evidence is now freeing truly innocent men from prison?
    Last edited by rainbow; 4 May 2008, 11:59 PM.

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    • #3
      How about posting articles relevant to the forum, i.e., dna and genealogy?

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      • #4
        I posted the link to the article since I found it interesting to see how the police decide what is a "match" in DNA since we here by the very nature of our DNA tests are also seeking to "match" with others. I found the differences interesting.

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        • #5
          I think that it is an important article. It is interesting that the number of markers used by police to convict people of serious crimes is far less than is deemed acceptable on this forum to identify relatives. If I based my genealogy research on the same number of markers used by the police, I would have to accept hundreds of new relatives from all over the world when I know that even 25 markers are insufficient to identity close relatives.

          John

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          • #6
            Originally posted by rainbow
            ..... So what if he is now an old white man....
            What does he being white have anything to do with it? You have three strikes - agism - old, racism - white and sexism - man. Three strikes and you are OUT.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by William23
              What does he being white have anything to do with it? You have three strikes - agism - old, racism - white and sexism - man. Three strikes and you are OUT.
              I thought the same thing. What's his skin color got to do with anything?

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              • #8
                It's brought up on the news daily.
                "First Black President", etc...
                Take care with the liberal press.
                I'm now an "old White Guy".
                When they convict people by DNA,
                one should keep in mind that DNA is no guessing game.
                63 of 67 is not a match unless you want it to.
                Too much silly stuff going on.
                darroll

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by girlperson1
                  I thought the same thing. What's his skin color got to do with anything?
                  I'm surprised that what asked. It's common knowledge that black men are quickly convicted with far less or no DNA evidence. I think the LA Times covered that story because he is "white". It was clearly sympathetic to him.


                  Here is the flip side, the story about DNA evidence clearing a man wrongly imprisoned for 27 years.
                  http://www.cnn.com/2008/CRIME/04/29/....ap/index.html

                  The Innocence Project
                  http://www.innocenceproject.org/
                  Last edited by rainbow; 5 May 2008, 03:57 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rainbow
                    I'm surprised that what asked. It's common knowledge that black men are quickly convicted with far less or no DNA evidence. I think the LA Times covered that story because he is "white". It was clearly sympathetic to him.


                    Here is the flip side, the story about DNA evidence clearing a man wrongly imprisoned for 27 years.
                    http://www.cnn.com/2008/CRIME/04/29/....ap/index.html

                    The Innocence Project
                    http://www.innocenceproject.org/
                    This is why I can't agree with the death penalty except under extraordinary circumstances where a party's guilt is absolutely proven. I dread to wonder how many people on death row all over this country have been put to death and yet they were innocent.

                    And yes I already knew about the innocence project.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Johnserrat
                      I think that it is an important article. It is interesting that the number of markers used by police to convict people of serious crimes is far less than is deemed acceptable on this forum to identify relatives. If I based my genealogy research on the same number of markers used by the police, I would have to accept hundreds of new relatives from all over the world when I know that even 25 markers are insufficient to identity close relatives.

                      John
                      And that is why criminal justice does not use uni-parental line DNA as conclusive evidence but depends, instead, on autosomal DNA where they can compare unique allelic profiles resulting from admixture.

                      Also relevant to genetic genealogy are the cautions about statistics and that those tested for genealogical purposes may be less inclined to post results if they think criminal justice is combing databases.

                      On the legal side of things this story indicates that criminal justice still rushes to judgment based on flimsy and/or uncorroborated evidence and evidence admitted by bending their very own rules of evidence.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tomcat
                        And that is why criminal justice does not use uni-parental line DNA as conclusive evidence but depends, instead, on autosomal DNA where they can compare unique allelic profiles resulting from admixture.

                        Also relevant to genetic genealogy are the cautions about statistics and that those tested for genealogical purposes may be less inclined to post results if they think criminal justice is combing databases.

                        On the legal side of things this story indicates that criminal justice still rushes to judgment based on flimsy and/or uncorroborated evidence and evidence admitted by bending their very own rules of evidence.
                        Based on autosomal CODIS markers, I would be considered strongly east asian even though I am entirely of germanic stock! As more and more tests are done, the allelic profiles become less and less unique, resulting in more and more mistakes. The number of markers used clearly needs to be expanded and better research needs to be done on what the CODIS markers mean from an ethnicity perspective.

                        John

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                        • #13
                          The primary use of CODIS, etc. in forensics is identity testing. The profiling capability of Omnipop, ENFSI, CFS, etc. may yield information useful to professional profilers. I don't know if the commercialized version of that technology, DNATribes, is used in profiling but have read of DNAPrint's AbDNA equivalent being employed for those purposes. I very much doubt anyone has been convicted or exhonerated on the basis of such secondary analyses.

                          Insofar as forensics is the driver of CODIS, etc. and DNATribes is a follow-on product - exploiting world-wide datasets of allele incidence while offering analytical refinements to ENFSI, CFS, etc. - one has to look to the forensics market for an expansion of the marker set and an overhaul of analytical means if this technology is to serve profiling purposes with greater accuracy.

                          Ancestry testing is the genealogical marketplace's equivalent of ethnic profiling.

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