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  • Blood/haplogroups/DNA

    Hello everyone,

    1) Is there a connection between haplogroups
    and blood groups - in other words are there
    any studies,which show the most prevalent
    blood group in each haplogroup ?

    2) How are blood groups passed down
    - which part of our DNA is responsible ?

    3) And is autosomal DNA - so random in nature ?

    Thank you for viewing and good day to you.
    Last edited by ROSCO; 10 February 2004, 11:32 PM.

  • #2
    Re: Blood/haplogroups/DNA

    Originally posted by ROSCO
    Hello everyone,

    1) Is there a connection between haplogroups
    and blood groups - in other words are there
    any studies,which show the most prevalent
    blood group in each haplogroup ?

    2) How are blood groups passed down
    - which part of our DNA is responsible ?

    3) And is autosomal DNA - so random in nature ?

    Thank you for viewing and good day to you.
    Hi,
    There is no correlation between blood groups and haplogroups. In the past people have tried constructing phylogenies based on blood groups, but like the tissue antigene gene, its all mixed up in populations and gives weird results. The genes responsible for blood groups are from autosomal DNA.

    Autosomal DNA is random in the sense of it being mixed down each generation, - but thats not why its bad for Anthropological/phylogenetic studies. Its bad because it isn't random (I know that sounds like a contradiction,...but it isn't). Any type of DNA that codes for a trait that might be advantagous in a population is useless for constructing anthropological phylogenies.

    When I was at university studying biology 10 years ago, I took studies in taxonomy and evolutionary biology. At that stage researchers were only just beginning to used DNA. Anyway, we were taught that the best type of DNA to use is DNA that doesn't code for any trait that could have one haplotype more advantagous than another (ie. not under "selection"). A good type of DNA to use is one that is "evolutionarily neutral".

    The Y-markers and mtDNA markers used in studies are the most "evolutionarily neutral" ones that can be used.

    Hope this helps

    Angela.

    Comment


    • #3
      THANK YOU ANGELA



      ANGELA,

      Thank you for taking the time to reply to my
      questions.

      Your energy, and your desire to help us all with your
      experience - is commendable !

      Best wishes - and good day to you.

      Comment

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