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Haplogroup U family

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  • Haplogroup U family

    I thought that I would start reading about our massive haplogroup U mtDNA family. I find all of haplogroup U to be very interesting as it seems to have a complex history with many different sub groups originating in different areas of the globe. It is a very ancient group and one of the oldest found in Eurasia. One of the most interesting facts about U that I just found out is that haplogroup K is actually a sub clade of U8.

    Anyone that is interested should check out this link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_U_%28mtDNA%29

  • #2
    A good tree of haplogroup U can be found in Achilli's paper:

    http://www.ajhg.org/AJHG/fulltext/S0002-9297(07)60734-4

    (it's figure 1). I am also hap U, though I belong to U1a.

    cacio

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cacio
      A good tree of haplogroup U can be found in Achilli's paper:

      http://www.ajhg.org/AJHG/fulltext/S0002-9297(07)60734-4

      (it's figure 1). I am also hap U, though I belong to U1a.

      cacio

      Yes thanks for the link Cacio that is a cool tree. I wish they would start focusing on other variants of U and U5 though other than just focusing on the Saami people all the time. The Saami are cool and interesting and all but I mean there are many other groups of people out there to study as well.

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      • #4
        Certain small populations are always overstudied...

        by the way, the best place to learn about haplogorup U is Ron Scott's page:

        http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ncscotts/

        (scroll down to mtdna)

        cacio

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        • #5
          U may have been here!

          Originally posted by J Man
          I thought that I would start reading about our massive haplogroup U mtDNA family. I find all of haplogroup U to be very interesting as it seems to have a complex history with many different sub groups originating in different areas of the globe. It is a very ancient group and one of the oldest found in Eurasia. One of the most interesting facts about U that I just found out is that haplogroup K is actually a sub clade of U8.

          Anyone that is interested should check out this link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup_U_%28mtDNA%29
          Perhaps here too....
          http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0111181736.htm

          ScienceDaily (Jan. 12, 2007)
          Last edited by derinos; 17 March 2008, 11:23 AM.

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          • #6
            derinos:

            it would be nice if they had bones and could do DNA tests. My guess for the Kostenki people is U5 and R1.

            cacio

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cacio
              Certain small populations are always overstudied...

              by the way, the best place to learn about haplogorup U is Ron Scott's page:

              http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ncscotts/

              (scroll down to mtdna)

              cacio

              Thanks for the link Cacio. On Ron Scott's comprehensive U mutation list I am EU490797 with an origin in Northern Ireland. I have loaded my results up to GenBank as well.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by derinos
                Perhaps here too....
                http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0111181736.htm

                ScienceDaily (Jan. 12, 2007)

                Fascinating article derinos. Like Cacio said it would be great if we could some DNA from the bones of those people in Russia. I also found it interesting that the author said that there may be other sites in south-centeal Europe that may be almost as old.

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                • #9
                  One thing I have been thinking about is when and where did U5b split off into U5b1 and U5b2? Did this even happen?

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                  • #10
                    There is very strong evidence that suggests that the original U5 group came to Europe very early on most likely with the Aurignacian culture. A paper from Scien cemag by Olivieri et al. demonstrates this nicely. It shows that U5 went into Europe around 40,000 years ago and U6/M1 went into North Africa at around the same time with the Dabban culture. Another fact that reinforces this is that the Cro-Magnon people of Europe and the paleolithic people of North Africa resembled each other physically as well.

                    It makes good sense to me that there was an Upper Paleolithic Levantine expansion and one group went northwest into Europe (U5) and another group went southwest into North Africa (U6/M1) at around the same time.

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                    • #11
                      40K years ago is also Achilli's estimate of U5's age, which broadly matches the entry of humans into Europe. Also, I believe U5 is not too common or too diverse in the near east, unlike many other haplogroups. Perhaps there were other haplogroups as well, but either they disappeared, or were reduced in size by random drift.

                      cacio

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cacio
                        40K years ago is also Achilli's estimate of U5's age, which broadly matches the entry of humans into Europe. Also, I believe U5 is not too common or too diverse in the near east, unlike many other haplogroups. Perhaps there were other haplogroups as well, but either they disappeared, or were reduced in size by random drift.

                        cacio

                        Yes you are correct cacio U5 is not common at all in the Near East and it is more diverse in Europe as well. The presence of U5 in the Near East is the result of people migrating back there from Europe.

                        I think that there were other haplogroups along with U5 in Europe 40K years ago but like you say they did disappear or were reduced by genetic drift probably during the ice age.

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                        • #13
                          I have recently been thinking about the Saami people. They have a very interesting and cool culture. And of course they are also very high in haplogroup U5 (U5b1b1).

                          All U5b people do share a common ancestry but I am wondering about when the different sub groups branched off from each other? U5b1 and U5b2 must be cousins that come from a common U5b source but they do have mutations that make them different as well. Where and when did this split happen? I know that we cannot really say anything for certain but it is fun to speculate anyways.

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                          • #14
                            re haplogroup U expansion...

                            It seems to me that the usual route of expansion into western Europe was up along the Danube. It happened over and over again by various groups.

                            Also, the appearance of U5, for example, deep inside Russia may have happened with the early expansion of the Slavs. They probably absorbed some U5 females into their society in eastern Europe before the great expansion occurred in variouus directions. Well, I'm just guessing, but there is a book on the expansion of the Slavs. Maybe I'll order it one of these days.

                            U5b2 & R1a1

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