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  • English-Viking DNA study

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0208105851.htm

  • #2
    Viking Blood

    This is not awfully fascinating.Most Encyclopedia articles and historical reads online mention that Vikings Came to Britain.Danes if not others went to England,Vikings came to Scotland and were allowed to live on their Northeast coast,Vikings also went to Ireland,couldn't be driven out and wound up blending in with the Irish population.This is not brand smacking new news-maybe it is for dull headed people.One would think with all the DNA research
    out there they would have known for a while now who contains Viking blood and what not.
    So there is Viking blodd in Britain,now what? What's significant about them? Anything? Do they cook over open fires,howl at the moon,carve rocks,what?

    Do they love Swedish stuff-love to shop at IKEA?

    Comment


    • #3
      Viking genetic Markers

      Oh, one more thing--What are the Viking markers? so you can know if you have one. Most Vikings were probably males-so did they marry British Celtic women is that it? I guess they did or else they'd die out.Sounds like a pretty nice combination. Can you tell by looking at them; what do Vikings look like?

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      • #4
        Not all Norsemen were Vikings! (Fortunately)..

        Originally posted by Jambalaia32
        Oh, one more thing--What are the Viking markers? so you can know if you have one. Most Vikings were probably males-so did they marry British Celtic women is that it? I guess they did or else they'd die out.Sounds like a pretty nice combination. Can you tell by looking at them; what do Vikings look like?
        You've got it right, Vikings were just the marine equivalent of motorcycle gangs in the Nordic world ( Norway Sweden Denmark Finland ). The Vikings were all males and rather unruly. They were not settlers.
        BUT the mainline Nordics were, often brought their women with them, and also intermarried with the CeltoGermanics.


        The mainline Nordics were basically as peaceful as anybody else in their time. They also did exploration, trading , ship design (and what Ships!!), and excelled at wood-sculpture, very nice steelwork, and invented Ikea furniture long before the name brand.

        3 centuries after the Germanics stole Britain from the RomanoCelts, the Nordics invaded several times and ended up stealing from them the northern half (then called the Danelaw) which still has different culture from the southeast.

        Note that the people before the Celts etc were not slouches. They farmed, had gold, wheat, pork, and wine, built Stonehenge, and are genetically still around!
        There is no specific Viking mode of Ydna, but a lot of them would have been I1a, I1b or of the R1 subclades.

        Comment


        • #5
          re: Vikings in UK

          Bryan Sykes, in one of his books, showed via mtDNA testing that female Vikings also came and settled in the northern most areas of Scotland, e.g. the northern Islands, especially.

          R1a1 & U5b2

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          • #6
            PDF of study available here -

            http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/25/2/301

            Comment


            • #7
              surname-based sampling

              Originally posted by Jambalaia32
              This is not awfully fascinating.Most Encyclopedia articles and historical reads online mention that Vikings Came to Britain.Danes if not others went to England,Vikings came to Scotland and were allowed to live on their Northeast coast,Vikings also went to Ireland,couldn't be driven out and wound up blending in with the Irish population.This is not brand smacking new news-maybe it is for dull headed people.One would think with all the DNA research
              out there they would have known for a while now who contains Viking blood and what not.
              So there is Viking blodd in Britain,now what? What's significant about them? Anything? Do they cook over open fires,howl at the moon,carve rocks,what?

              Do they love Swedish stuff-love to shop at IKEA?
              The importance of this study is that it is a test case to evaluate the potential of surname-based ascertainment to allow investigation of the influence of migration and drift over the last few centuries in changing the population structure of the British Isles.

              In West Lancashire, a list of 232 surnames based on a list of inhabitants of Ormskirk, Scarisbrick with Hurlton, Bickerstaffe, Burscough with Marton, Westhead with Lathom, and Skelmersdale who promised to contribute to the stipend of the priest of the altar of Our Lady at Ormskirk in 1366 was used.

              If your surname is not on the list, and you were not born in the area, then I doubt if you would find this facinating.

              However, if like me, your surname is on the list and you were born in West Lancashire, then this information is intriguing.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
                Bryan Sykes, in one of his books, showed via mtDNA testing that female Vikings also came and settled in the northern most areas of Scotland, e.g. the northern Islands, especially.

                R1a1 & U5b2
                Not just there - he says in "Blood of the Isles" that he may have been too hasty in claiming that only 7 women (the "Seven Daughters of Eve") were ancestral to well over 90% of the indigenous European population. He now wants to include "Ulrike" (U4), who has a small but detectable presence on the east coast of England as well as the far north. U4 people are much more common in Scandinavia and the Baltic countries, and Sykes believes that this genetic sequence came to the British Isles with some of the Vikings' womenfolk.

                My wife belongs to this mtDNA haplogroup, and all her mitochondrial ancestors that we can trace were in the north-east of England, mainly Northumberland.

                Harry

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                • #9
                  Tomcat, thanks much for posting this link. I used this article today, and others that were linked to it, in the History of the English Language course that I'm teaching. Although the articles don't address language issues, my students found the dna studies fascinating and the information presented in the articles dove-tailed quite well with our discussions of the settling of Britain.

                  As a side note, I don't see much in the literature on mtDNA Hg X, which is found in the Orkneys, among other places. If anyone knows of any current articles on it, I'd appreciate knowing about them.

                  Vinnie

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Honest Settlers should not be called Vikings.

                    Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
                    Bryan Sykes, in one of his books, showed via mtDNA testing that female Vikings also came and settled in the northern most areas of Scotland, e.g. the northern Islands, especially.

                    R1a1 & U5b2
                    The NADL (Norse Antidefamation League) wishes to suggest that Nordic or Norse exploration, exporting and importing, trading posts, legitimate mercenary military services, genetic mixing, and colonisation, no longer be referred to as "Viking" activity.

                    These positive historic contributions are bracketed by the discoveries of America by Bjarni Herjolfsson & Leif Ericsson, and the export of Volvo cars..... The "Vikings" were international outlaws evading parental supervision.

                    Tak for als!

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                    • #11
                      Thanks

                      I'll try to avoid the improper use of "Viking" in the future.

                      R1a1

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by clintonplatt
                        If your surname is not on the list, and you were not born in the area, then I doubt if you would find this facinating.

                        However, if like me, your surname is on the list and you were born in West Lancashire, then this information is intriguing.
                        I wish they would at least post modal DYS values.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The “Vikings” were Scandinavian (sometimes referred to as ”pirates”).
                          Who moved them to Scotland? darroll

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PDHOTLEN
                            I'll try to avoid the improper use of "Viking" in the future.

                            R1a1

                            This is silly (not you PDHOTLEN).
                            I was working in the garage and hit my finger with a hammer.
                            I almost said the “V’ word. More silliness.. d


                            I1a

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by darroll
                              The “Vikings” were Scandinavian (sometimes referred to as ”pirates”).
                              Who moved them to Scotland? darroll
                              Dragonships?

                              Comment

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