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Hg T FGS Research Project

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  • #16
    There are at least a couple of each subclade so far except for T1b and T1c.

    Lots of T1s and T2s though!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MMaddi
      .....We'll probably have the most impressive haplogroup branch of any mtDNA haplogroup by the end of this year.
      Better hurry; we already have 120 K FGS results back.

      Bill Hurst

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      • #18
        I received my FGS results today and was, not surprisingly, changed from a T5 to a T2. I have 42 mutation from CRS. I have not yet had the time to figure out if they mean anything.

        John

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        • #19
          It looks like all of the T4 people are now T2a.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by R2-D2
            It looks like all of the T4 people are now T2a.
            Anyone know what is happening with the T3 people? I'm just wondering if we are only going to be left with T1 and T2 at this point.

            John

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Johnserrat
              Anyone know what is happening with the T3 people? I'm just wondering if we are only going to be left with T1 and T2 at this point.

              John
              At this point, probably. Only because FTDNA's system is going off of the currently published work. Once this research is done then we will be sorted out into new subclades. Hopefully I will be able to add a letter onto my hg and lose my asterisk.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by R2-D2
                At this point, probably. Only because FTDNA's system is going off of the currently published work. Once this research is done then we will be sorted out into new subclades. Hopefully I will be able to add a letter onto my hg and lose my asterisk.

                to my knowledge, Finnila was the first who placed a bunch of Ts into one T2 haplogroup. So what does this "currently published work" reveal? Referring to it as a refinement of the phylogeny already known from complete sequencing would be more correct and unpretentious. If the participants reveal all their coding-region mutations, it'd be a great work on the Western Europe Ts.
                Last edited by vraatyah; 23 February 2008, 02:32 PM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by vraatyah
                  to my knowledge, Finnila was the first who placed a bunch of Ts into one T2 haplogroup. So what does this "currently published work" reveal? Referring to it as a refinement of the phylogeny already known from complete sequencing would be more correct and unpretentious. If the participants reveal all their coding-region mutations, it'd be a great work on the Western Europe Ts.
                  The paper is: Reduced-Median-Network Analysis of Complete Mitochondrial DNA Coding-Region Sequences for the Major African, Asian, and European Haplogroups by Herrnstadt et al 2002. Here's a link. It is because of coding region markers(11812 and 14233) listed in this paper on page 4 that are the reason many of us are being switched to hg T2. The T FGS Research Project is looking to expand on this and discover new subclades.
                  Last edited by R2-D2; 23 February 2008, 03:32 PM.

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                  • #24
                    No, Finnila's work predates one by Herrnstadt. It reveals the place of old T2, T3 and T+9bpdel ("Bormann lineage") in the new T2 branch.

                    Thank you for sharing the info about T4. I have the RFLP results for such sequences that place them into T2 (and I already mentioned this a year before in the topic on T subgroups prediction). Now I know more


                    Valery

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                    • #25
                      Thanks R2-D2.

                      It is hard to believe that our reclassification is based on a study published in 2002! Makes me even happier to have participated in this project.

                      John

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