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Haplogroup percentages in Europe.

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  • Haplogroup percentages in Europe.

    I can find publications that list the Haplogoup percentages in various individual European countries, but I have not found any that give the percentages for Europe as a whole. Neither have I been able to figure out how to extract this figure from the FTDNA, ysearch and similar public databases. Can anyone help? I'm mainly interested in the yDNA Haplogroup distribution, but mtDNA would be a bonus.

  • #2
    Here are two comprehensive papers about YDNA and mtDNA in Europe:

    Y-Chromosomal Variation in European Populations, a doctoral dissertation by by Siiri Rootsi of Dept of Evolutionary Bilogy, Univ of Tartu, Estonia, 2004.
    http://www.ebc.ee/tymri00/PhD/2004/SRootsi_thesis.pdf

    Geographic Patterns of mtDNA Diversity in Europe, Lucia Simoni et al, 2000.
    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/art...medid=10631156
    Last edited by Kaiser; 12 December 2007, 06:16 AM.

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    • #3
      Thanks, Kaiser!

      The Rootsi dissertation was pleasurable, and despite its importance, quite easy to read. It is essential infrastructure to what we dilettanti so lightly discuss every day in this forum. I have copied it as a basic reference text. Many thanks.

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      • #4
        Thank you Kaiser. Yes, I have Rootsi's article, and most of her other very informative articles too. For us Haplogroup N3a people she has been very helpful. Again the problem with this article it gives the percentages for some individual countries, but not for Europe as a whole. And as many large populations are missing one cannot simply do a "reverse engineering" job and get the European figures.

        The mtDNA article is new to me and I have not fully studied it yet, but from Table 3 I can see a lot of individual countries tabulated. If I can also find the sample sizes in each country I can calculate the European average.

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        • #5
          Sven:

          I would weight each country by its population rather than by sample size. Sample sizes may be similar, but countries may have very different populations.

          One should also be aware that often the samples selected within each country are skewed, that is, the researchers sometimes sample particular areas of the country that are interesteing for historical reasons, but are not representative of the country as a whole. For instance, in the case of Italy, the south is often oversampled, especially Sardinia, relative to the North.

          cacio

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          • #6
            Thank you Cacio - good idea, I should have thought of that. Using the total population should work as well. Unfortunately the authors have split some countries into regions so I'm stuck again!

            Your point about skewed sampling data is of course also valid, I guess we will have to wait a long time before the Haplogroup statistics becomes reliable.

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            • #7
              Svein:

              but perhaps that's even better - getting down to the regional level may make estimates more precise (provided of course that one knows the region population, not the easiest thing).

              The bias depends on the country. I suspect that for many/most European countries the bias will be small, since they are relatively homogeneous. This seems to be the case, say, for the UK, Germany, France, and the northern ones (as long as lappland is excluded). For Italy the bias is not small, but it is not enormous either - vince vizachero has discussed this issue in his italydna.blogspot.com

              cacio

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              • #8
                2 cents worth...

                Populations in some areas of Europe have shifted and become even more mixed since WWII. So I hope sample subjects were asked where there ancestral roots were, when results are tabulated.

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                • #9
                  Here are the mt hg percentages in ethnic Russians of many regions, N > 1000, data is collected from published sources:


                  http://dnatree.ru/index.php?name=For...r=asc&start=10

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                  • #10
                    Because the link I just posted refers to a page in Russian language, it'd be more useful to repost the pooled frequences. Modern Russians are not an extremely large nation, however they live at the easternmost fringe of Europe which total area is comparable to that occupied by Northern or Central Europe.


                    N=940 (1 forensic sample excluded)


                    H 42,77
                    HV 1,7
                    pre-V 2,34
                    (Pre-V)1 0,11
                    (Pre-V)2 0,11
                    V 0,85
                    (pre-HV)1 0,21
                    J* 4,89 (likely J1c)
                    J1b 0,11
                    J1b1 1,17
                    J1c 0,11
                    J2b 0,21
                    T* 0,53
                    T1a 3,4
                    T1b 0,11
                    T2* 1,38
                    T2-T5 0,21
                    T2b 4,57
                    T2c 1,06
                    U* 1,91
                    U1a 0,32
                    U1* 0,11
                    U2e 1,28
                    U3a 0,74
                    U4 4,15
                    U5a 7,02
                    U5b 2,55
                    U7* 0,11
                    U7a 0,32
                    U8a 0,32
                    U8b1 0,11
                    U8K 4,26
                    R* 0,21
                    R1 0,11
                    R2 0,11
                    N1a 0,43
                    N1b 0,43
                    N1I 0,74
                    N1I1 1,38
                    N2W 1,7
                    X* 0,64 (likely X2)
                    X2 1,06
                    L1b 0,11
                    L3b 0,11
                    M* 0,43
                    M1 0,11
                    M1a1 0,11
                    M12G2a 0,11
                    M12G2a1a 0,11
                    M5a 0,11
                    M8C 0,53
                    M8Z1 0,32
                    M9a2 0,11
                    MD4d 0,11
                    MD5a 0,11
                    N9b-Y1 0,11
                    UNKNOWN 1,7 (likely R*, N* and H, no RFLPs / inconsistent RFLPs)
                    Last edited by vraatyah; 14 December 2007, 08:38 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by vraatyah
                      Because the link I just posted refers to a page in Russian language, it'd be more useful to repost the pooled frequences. Modern Russians are not an extremely large nation, however they live at the easternmost fringe of Europe which total area is comparable to that occupied by Northern or Central Europe.


                      N=940 (1 forensic sample excluded)


                      U* 1,91
                      U1a 0,32
                      U1* 0,11
                      U2e 1,28
                      U3a 0,74
                      U4 4,15
                      U5a 7,02
                      U5b 2,55
                      U7* 0,11
                      U7a 0,32
                      U8a 0,32
                      U8b1 0,11
                      U8K 4,26
                      R* 0,21
                      R1 0,11
                      R2 0,11
                      N1a 0,43
                      N1b 0,43
                      N1I 0,74
                      N1I1 1,38
                      N2W 1,7
                      X* 0,64 (likely X2)
                      X2 1,06
                      L1b 0,11
                      L3b 0,11
                      I have quoted only some of the list but there are a couple of things I don't understand. Would I be correct in assuming that U8K is what is refered to in most academic publications as K*, K1 and K2.

                      Also, it is not clear as to the notation after each haplogroup. Was any L1b actually found? I thought that the first number was percentage and the second was the number in relation to the total of N=940.

                      David.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DKF
                        I have quoted only some of the list but there are a couple of things I don't understand. Would I be correct in assuming that U8K is what is refered to in most academic publications as K*, K1 and K2.

                        Also, it is not clear as to the notation after each haplogroup. Was any L1b actually found? I thought that the first number was percentage and the second was the number in relation to the total of N=940.

                        David.

                        Hi David!

                        I prefer a "skeleton" notation for some haplogroups - for those whose affiliations were recently discovered (5-7 y ago), and for all Ms. Yes, U8K is just K. As for Russian Ls, they appeared in a paper by B.Malyarchuk, the samples were collected in Central Russian cities Tula and Kaluga.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DKF
                          I thought that the first number was percentage and the second was the number in relation to the total of N=940.
                          each number is what N/940 multiplied by 100 yields after rounding.

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                          • #14
                            sorry I didn't get it right - I mean your question about the numbers! In Russia, the decimal separator is only ",". I just didn't change the format.

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