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Paper: Proto-European migration to western China

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  • Paper: Proto-European migration to western China

    "Retrospecting the Origin and Migration of the Ancient Nations along the Silk Road," by Chen Zhiyong (in Chinese)

    http://comonca.org/2007015.aspx

    There may be little if any original research in this paper, but it has two interesting maps which I have not seen anywhere before.

    Fig. 12 is a map of migration routes of people of Europoid ancestry to Xinjiang in western China. Here's a translation of the labels:

    Blue line (origin): Proto-Indo-Europeans

    Blue line to left: Western branch of Indo-European speakers

    Ends of blue line: (Upper) Afanasevo people; (Lower) Tocharian people; the mountain range above the Tocharian label is the Altay/Altay range

    White line (both ends): Andronovo people

    Dark red line: (Start) People of the southern Caucasus; (End) Scythians

    Yellow line (ends): Northern Iranian speaking Scythians; the mountain range below the yellow line is the Tianshan or Tian Mountains; the label below that is Tarim Basin

    Orange line (ends): Eastern Iranian speaking Scythians; the mountain range below the orange line is the Pamirs

    Fig. 11 is also interesting. It shows the composition of ancient "European" populations in western China.

    White: Proto-Europeans; the completely white circle is by the Konqi, Kongque, or Peacock River

    Blue: Central Asian two rivers type (defined in the text as referring to "Pamir-Ferghana")

    Red: Mediterraneans

    Yellow: Mongolians

    Blue arrow: Northern migration route

    Orange arrow: Southern migration route

    The author mentions the famous mummies but says nothing about their DNA. The references to DNA in the text are to modern populations.

    Jim

  • #2
    Originally posted by Jim Honeychuck
    "Retrospecting the Origin and Migration of the Ancient Nations along the Silk Road," by Chen Zhiyong (in Chinese)

    http://comonca.org/2007015.aspx

    There may be little if any original research in this paper, but it has two interesting maps which I have not seen anywhere before.

    Fig. 12 is a map of migration routes of people of Europoid ancestry to Xinjiang in western China. Here's a translation of the labels:

    Blue line (origin): Proto-Indo-Europeans

    Blue line to left: Western branch of Indo-European speakers

    Ends of blue line: (Upper) Afanasevo people; (Lower) Tocharian people; the mountain range above the Tocharian label is the Altay/Altay range

    White line (both ends): Andronovo people

    Dark red line: (Start) People of the southern Caucasus; (End) Scythians

    Yellow line (ends): Northern Iranian speaking Scythians; the mountain range below the yellow line is the Tianshan or Tian Mountains; the label below that is Tarim Basin

    Orange line (ends): Eastern Iranian speaking Scythians; the mountain range below the orange line is the Pamirs

    Fig. 11 is also interesting. It shows the composition of ancient "European" populations in western China.

    White: Proto-Europeans; the completely white circle is by the Konqi, Kongque, or Peacock River

    Blue: Central Asian two rivers type (defined in the text as referring to "Pamir-Ferghana")

    Red: Mediterraneans

    Yellow: Mongolians

    Blue arrow: Northern migration route

    Orange arrow: Southern migration route

    The author mentions the famous mummies but says nothing about their DNA. The references to DNA in the text are to modern populations.

    Jim

    Very interesting and cool stuff Jim! Thanks for the posting. I am just wondering though which modern cultures have a large portion of J2a among them in China?

    And to which ancient ethnic group did the J2a come from which made it to China?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by J Man
      Very interesting and cool stuff Jim! Thanks for the posting. I am just wondering though which modern cultures have a large portion of J2a among them in China?

      And to which ancient ethnic group did the J2a come from which made it to China?
      The references to J2a in the paper all refer to the Caucasus or nearby areas. All the paper says about J in China is this:

      "Uyghur people of Urumqi have E and J, which is not found among the Uyghurs of Ili, but they lack K* which is frequent among the Ili Uyghurs. E and J should be considered markers of Middle Eastern agricultural people, whereas K* is an ancient Central Asian marker, and unconnected with Indian L. Seen that way, Uyghurs of Urumqi have a larger component of Mediterraneans."

      "The Ili Uyghur situation has a very good explanation. The Ili River basin lies within the Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture, so the Ili Uyghurs are a southern Siberian type which only took shape recently, and they are actually a northern route group. A question about the Urumqi Uyghurs is how did the Mediterranean component appear in Urumqi? Careful thought makes it clear: Urumqi is in the interior of Xinjiang, and it is the capital of the Autonomous Region, so groups from the northern and southern routes converged there. So it is natural that the Mediterranean component among the Uyghurs would be greater in Urumqi than in Ili."

      That's all it says about J in China. So they came in by the southern route, the orange lines in Figures 11 and 12. The red in Figure 11 is Mediterranean people, so the J's are mixed in with them.

      Jim

      Comment

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