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  • South Yemeni DNA test

    Regards,

    is there any spesific test for those whose origin are from South Yemen (hadromout) as i would like to relate myself to some common tribe/clan in yemen, such as Al Kathiri, Abdat, BaAlawi, Bawazeer etc

    Is the arabian peninsula dna test possible to do that ?

    Please do let me know if that is possible.

    Also is the test available in Indonesia.

    Thanks

    Omar Ka'wileh.

  • #2
    omar:

    right now it is not possible to determine exact biological membership in a specific tribe. There is no dataset, so nobody knows whether each tribe has a specific genetic marker, and if so, which one it is.

    What does exist are papers on Yemen in general, that is, papers that show the distribution of haplogroups in Yemen or in the Middle East. There are some haplogroups that are more frequent in the Middle East than elsewhere. For instance, the dominant haplogroup in Arabia is called J1; and J1 is very rare in India and Indonesia. But that's about it - no specific information on a tribe.

    Some people have set up an Arabian peninsula ftdna project, which you may want to check:
    http://www.familytreedna.com/public/...ulaDNAProject/

    As for the company, I think the main US companies (FTDNA, genographic project etc) take samples from all over the world.

    cacio

    Comment


    • #3
      Has that J1 ever been tested in Indonesia as many Indonesians are arab descent.

      Comment


      • #4
        omar:

        I don't remember a specific paper on Indonesia, but if I remember correctly, J1 is almost totally absent from Indonesia. The same is true for India and Pakistan, where a lot of people claim to be descendants of the Arabs. There was a very long discussion in the past about India and Pakistan and this topic:

        http://www.ftdna.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2025

        (the thread is very long, so you have to skip through it to get at the relevant points). But I think the bottom line is that most of these claims of Arab affiliation in South Asia are not biological, that is, it's more a cultural affiliation thing, local people (of local birth) associating themselves to these Arabic tribes.

        Incidentally, J1 is not the exclusive haplogroup in Arabia. J2 is also very frequent, and there's a little of E3b, G and the like. But all these haplogroups are rare in South Asia, where other haplogroups prevail (in the case of Indonesia, O is the most frequent).

        cacio

        Comment


        • #5
          Myself was born in Indonesia. It was my great grandfather who migrated from Yemen.

          Does that mean if im tested i should expect no J1 result ? as in no result at all ?

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't have access to this paper.

            European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication 10 October 2007; doi: 10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201934

            Y-chromosome diversity characterizes the Gulf of Oman

            Alicia M Cadenas1, Lev A Zhivotovsky2, Luca L Cavalli-Sforza3, Peter A Underhill3 and Rene J Herrera1

            1. 1Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA
            2. 2N. I. Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
            3. 3Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA

            Correspondence: Dr RJ Herrera, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, University Park, OE 304, Miami, FL 33199 USA. Tel: +1 305 348 1258; Fax: +1 305 348 1259; E-mail: herrerar@fiu.edu

            Received 20 February 2007; Revised 30 August 2007; Accepted 11 September 2007; Published online 10 October 2007.
            Top of page
            Abstract

            Arabia has served as a strategic crossroads for human disseminations, providing a natural connection between the distant populations of China and India in the east to the western civilizations along the Mediterranean. To explore this region's critical role in the migratory episodes leaving Africa to Eurasia and back, high-resolution Y-chromosome analysis of males from the United Arab Emirates (164), Qatar (72) and Yemen (62) was performed. The role of the Levant in the Neolithic dispersal of the E3b1-M35 sublineages is supported by the data, and the distribution and STR-based analyses of J1-M267 representatives points to their spread from the north, most likely during the Neolithic. With the exception of Yemen, southern Arabia, South Iran and South Pakistan display high diversity in their Y-haplogroup substructure possibly a result of gene flow along the coastal crescent-shaped corridor of the Gulf of Oman facilitating human dispersals. Elevated rates of consanguinity may have had an impact in Yemen and Qatar, which experience significant heterozygote deficiencies at various hypervariable autosomal STR loci.

            Keywords:

            Arabia, Y-chromosome, SNP, Y-STR


            Here is another paper you might find interesting. It is available free at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJH...024771.web.pdf

            Extensive Female-Mediated Gene Flow from Sub-Saharan Africa into Near Eastern Arab Populations

            We have analyzed and compared mitochondrial DNA variation of populations from the Near East and Africa and found a very high frequency of African lineages present in the Yemen Hadramawt: more than a third were of clear sub-Saharan origin. Other Arab populations carried 10% lineages of sub-Saharan origin, whereas non-Arab Near Eastern populations, by contrast, carried few or no such lineages, suggesting that gene flow has been preferentially into Arab populations. Several lines of evidence suggest that most of this gene flow probably occurred within the past 2,500 years. In contrast, there is little evidence for male-mediated gene flow from sub-Saharan Africa in Y-chromosome haplotypes in Arab populations, including the Hadramawt. Taken together, these results are consistent with substantial migration from eastern Africa into Arabia, at least in part as a result of the Arab slave trade, and mainly female assimilation into the Arabian population as a result of miscegenation and manumission.

            PDF file

            Comment


            • #7
              omar:

              if you know that your g-grandfather came from Yemen, then it is possible that you have one of the Arabic haplogroups (J1 most likely, but also J2, E3b, G).

              The discussion I was referring to before was about people whose family _legend_ says that they came from Arabia many centuries ago, as for instance many Syeds and the like. In this case, at least for India and Pakistan, it seems that biologically those families belong to local South Asian haplogroups rather than Arabic ones.

              In the case of Indonesia, the most frequent haplogroup should be O (O like the letter of the alphabet), so the most likely result for a native Indonesian is O.

              Jim:
              the first article seems very interesting, I hope access will be available soon...

              cacio

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by cacio
                omar:

                Jim:
                the first article seems very interesting, I hope access will be available soon...

                cacio
                It's available for purchase. Not my area of interest.

                Jim

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by cacio
                  omar:

                  Jim:
                  the first article seems very interesting, I hope access will be available soon...

                  cacio
                  cacio

                  Just email the corresponding author and request an electronic reprint. This is normal procedure among academics. This whole business about paying for scientific papers has only arisen since publishers started to make papers available online and I doubt that many people actually ever buy papers. Most academic institutions will have subscriptions to the major journals.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mickm
                    cacio

                    Just email the corresponding author and request an electronic reprint. This is normal procedure among academics. This whole business about paying for scientific papers has only arisen since publishers started to make papers available online and I doubt that many people actually ever buy papers. Most academic institutions will have subscriptions to the major journals.
                    Really?

                    So the admin of a forum could do this and make the studies available to all the members of his forum?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree Omar. I am Pakistani, and for some reason most Muslim Pakistani's and Indian's like to think they have lineage going back to the Arabs. I did some research about this topic the conclusion is, a lot of Pakistani's and Indian's are converts of the "upper caste" in India. When they converted to Islam they wanted to keep their social status therefore they started identifying themselves with Arab lineages. Yet, they don't have family trees to prove their Arab ancestry links. This has carried on for generations.

                      I hope more Pakistani's and Indian Muslims start doing Genealogical testing.


                      Originally posted by cacio View Post
                      omar:

                      I don't remember a specific paper on Indonesia, but if I remember correctly, J1 is almost totally absent from Indonesia. The same is true for India and Pakistan, where a lot of people claim to be descendants of the Arabs. There was a very long discussion in the past about India and Pakistan and this topic:

                      http://www.ftdna.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2025

                      (the thread is very long, so you have to skip through it to get at the relevant points). But I think the bottom line is that most of these claims of Arab affiliation in South Asia are not biological, that is, it's more a cultural affiliation thing, local people (of local birth) associating themselves to these Arabic tribes.

                      Incidentally, J1 is not the exclusive haplogroup in Arabia. J2 is also very frequent, and there's a little of E3b, G and the like. But all these haplogroups are rare in South Asia, where other haplogroups prevail (in the case of Indonesia, O is the most frequent).

                      cacio

                      Comment

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