Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SNP Tests

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • SNP Tests

    Under my Haplogroup tab (I am J2) there is reference to SNP tests. My value is M172+

    What does all this mean?

    Thank you.

  • #2
    haplotree

    Mr. Pavellas,
    Go to www.familytreedna.com/haplotree.html and this will help to explain things. Basically you were positive for the deep ancestrial marker M172 which identifies J2. I am P25+ which makes me R1b. Hope this helps.
    Don Potter

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: haplotree

      Originally posted by Don Potter
      Mr. Pavellas,
      Go to www.familytreedna.com/haplotree.html and this will help to explain things. Basically you were positive for the deep ancestrial marker M172 which identifies J2. I am P25+ which makes me R1b. Hope this helps.
      Don Potter
      Thanks, Don. This helps a lot, but I still don't know what "SNP Tests" refer(s) to.
      Ron Pavellas

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: SNP Tests

        Originally posted by rpavellas
        Under my Haplogroup tab (I am J2) there is reference to SNP tests. My value is M172+

        What does all this mean?

        Thank you.
        Here's the answer as best I understand it .........

        SNP refers to Single Nucleotide Polymorphism. What it (the note on the tab) is referring to is the option to test for the sequence (M172) which is indicative of the haplogroup J2, to confirm that you actually do belong in J2.

        Haplogroups come from the big anthropological Phylogenetic tree (which shows how all human Y-chromosomes are related). The sequences that are used for constructing the big anthroplogical phylogenetic tree are different sequences to those used in geneology DNA testing. This big phylogentic tree they have, have the different braches defined by specific sequences. One such branch is the haplogroup J2. The sequences used to define the various branches of the tree (generally SNP's) are generally much more expersive to run than the sequences used in the 12/25/37 marker tests.

        The tests here are (as I understand it) what are called mini or microsatellite repeats (each DYS# is a mini or microsatellite marker) . They are much more appropriate for geneology purposes, and much cheaper to run. Different combinations of DYS values are generally correlated with particular Haplogroups.

        There is a data base where individuals have been tested for the SNP sequences as well as the DYS repeats. To get your haplotype, basically what they do here is compare your DYS results with the database, and see what haplogroup people with the same set of DYS numbers as you have. Sometimes there is no one in the database which has the same set of DYS numbers, in that case they can't immediately assign you a Haplogroup. At this stage they are reasonably sure that you are in J2, - but they cannot say 100% for sure without testing you specifically for M172

        Basically what they are saying on the tab is that you have the option of ordering the appropriate SNP test to confirm you are in the haplotype. This does cost more again, - but as I said the SNP tests are much more expensive than the DYS tests (which is one reason why they are generally not used for geneology purposes).

        Hope this helps,
        Angela.

        Comment


        • #5
          J2 the Haplogroup that Cohanim and many Jews come from. Does your family have a tradition of being a Cohen or Levi? (many Israelites are J2 as well)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by IZZY
            J2 the Haplogroup that Cohanim and many Jews come from. Does your family have a tradition of being a Cohen or Levi? (many Israelites are J2 as well)
            No family history of being Jewish to my knowledge. Three grandparerents were born in Greece (Pavellas, Pagonis, Diakakis) and one in the USA of Dutch and Scots-Irish ancestry (Harpending/Thompson). My genotype relates to a few Jewish names, however, through FamilyTreeDNA. There may be a Roumanian Jewish connection via the Pavellas ancestry who were dispersed during the invasion of the Ottomans and, according to a relative, fled to Roumania and adopted the name"Pavel." Upon the family returning to Greece decades or perhaps centuries later (again, according to my third cousin) they had lost the original name and tacked "las" on the end to Greekify it. This is hypothetical, but a good story.

            Comment


            • #7
              Intresting. Have you considered that the largest jewish community was in Istanbul in 1700, and greece had many jews as well? Certainly possible that Romania was the "infusion."

              Of course there was a greek jewish population since the time of Ptolemy.

              Comment


              • #8
                R. Pavellas,

                A question for you. Did you order the "Dna Works"? You mention a SNP value, have you klicked on it to see if it really is another test? Or did the "Works" (vs. the cheaper tests) really include it all as they imlplicate in the Intro web site?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by IZZY
                  R. Pavellas,

                  A question for you. Did you order the "Dna Works"? You mention a SNP value, have you klicked on it to see if it really is another test? Or did the "Works" (vs. the cheaper tests) really include it all as they imlplicate in the Intro web site?
                  My reading of the DNA Works description is that it does NOT include the SNP test. I think Mr. Pavellas was referring to his suggested haplogroup. See http://www.familytreedna.com/description.html#dnaworks

                  Bill H.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by IZZY
                    R. Pavellas,

                    A question for you. Did you order the "Dna Works"? You mention a SNP value, have you klicked on it to see if it really is another test? Or did the "Works" (vs. the cheaper tests) really include it all as they imlplicate in the Intro web site?
                    IZZY: I ordered and received the maximum tests a person of the male persuasion can fruitfully order, to my knowledge. I got DNA Works + an additional $100 test to locate my haplotype accurately. My Mother's ancient maternal line mother comes from the Florence, Italy area, carrying a "K" haplotype. I have a match to an unknown or unrevealed person in Roumania who is Ashkenazi. I have a match to a known person with whom I have communicated who is an American Jew with a Polish name. I have other matches, widely dispersed (Including Germany, India & Sri Lanka), but overall my origins are 100% European. The Sri Lanka connection I assume is through the Dutch traders, "Burghers," who settled there hundreds of years ago.
                    Last edited by rpavellas; 18 January 2004, 10:01 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well hows that for family history!? Neat that you have it pretty well sorted out.

                      I too ordered the "works" (just a little before the switch from 25 to 37) I did not order the extra SNP test, only because I did not know of its existance. (was not on list of tests offered)...I was honestly under the imression that the "works" was the most...alas if want to be Sure (and not guess) I will have to order the SNP test as well.

                      So far the 12 markers that came in say I'm likely R1a.

                      This makes a diffrence to me, cause being an Ashkenazi Levite there is a paper that would question my status based on gentics if I was R1a1 ( there is a diff. bet R1a and R1a1).

                      So I would like to know.

                      Thank you for sharing your experiance and history.

                      IZZY

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Izzy -- what matters is whether your MOTHER was Jewish -- mtDNA. (-: Actually, people are so mixed and so many moved around that I don't think you will find any pure anythings anywhere. Just bear in mind, for example, that there was a large Celtic settlement in Turkey about 1800 years ago. Could have mixed with your Jewish ancestors. You can still be a Levite and have a non-Jewish male ancestor.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by whitkeen
                          Izzy -- what matters is whether your MOTHER was Jewish -- mtDNA. (-: Actually, people are so mixed and so many moved around that I don't think you will find any pure anythings anywhere. Just bear in mind, for example, that there was a large Celtic settlement in Turkey about 1800 years ago. Could have mixed with your Jewish ancestors. You can still be a Levite and have a non-Jewish male ancestor.

                          Are your sure about the statement you made that "You can still be a Levite and have a non-Jewish male ancestor." ????

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mike Mallett
                            Are your sure about the statement you made that "You can still be a Levite and have a non-Jewish male ancestor." ????
                            Yes.
                            I'm not sure how it happened - but 63% Ashkenazi Levites have haplotype R Y-chromosomes.
                            Like the cohanim, all Levites should be of Jewish male descent, however I'm thinking that at some point in the past the rules were relaxed in the Ashkenazi populations, either that or genetic drift (as the authors of the 2003 paper suggest). The paper authors were wuite surprise with the results too, especially since in contrast only 12 % of Sephardi Levites are haplotype R.
                            The paper is in the website Library "Multiple origins of Ashkenazi Levites".

                            angela.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by AngelaCP
                              Yes.
                              I'm not sure how it happened - but 63% Ashkenazi Levites have haplotype R Y-chromosomes.
                              Like the cohanim, all Levites should be of Jewish male descent, however I'm thinking that at some point in the past the rules were relaxed in the Ashkenazi populations, either that or genetic drift (as the authors of the 2003 paper suggest). The paper authors were wuite surprise with the results too, especially since in contrast only 12 % of Sephardi Levites are haplotype R.
                              The paper is in the website Library "Multiple origins of Ashkenazi Levites".

                              angela.
                              I don't know about all this stuff you are referring to but I do know that the Levi line is carried on from father to son just like the Y chromosome is past from father to son. The woman doesn't have anything to do with it. Look at Jesus' genealogy, there was women of different origins ( Ruth, Rahab) but the man had to come from the tribe of Judah.


                              Mike

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X