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Male version of Haplogroup X

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  • Male version of Haplogroup X

    If Haplogroup X represents mtDNA, what haplogroup or haplotype represents X in the Y-DNA? In other words, would my blood brother also be Haplogroup X like myself or would he have a different group or type name?

  • #2
    Originally posted by girlperson1
    If Haplogroup X represents mtDNA, what haplogroup or haplotype represents X in the Y-DNA? In other words, would my blood brother also be Haplogroup X like myself or would he have a different group or type name?
    If your brother had the same mother as you he would also have her mt-DNA and it would also be haplo X. His Y came his father. There are no equivalencies between Y and Mt haplogroups although certain Y and Mt halogroups are co-incident in certain populations and may be incident to a similar degree, but they are completely different lines.
    Last edited by tomcat; 12 August 2007, 12:32 PM.

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    • #3
      girlperson1:

      the mtdna is passed from the _mother_ to both her male and female children. So your brother would be mtdna X as you are. Your mother would pass the same thing to both of you.

      The Y chromosome is passed from the _father_ to the male children (but not to females), and is completely independent from the mtdna. So there is no reason why a brother would have any particular Y chromosome haplogroup given the mother's mtdna. It depends only on the father.

      The letter names associated with mtdna or Y (eg mtdna haplogroup X, or Y-chromosome haplogroup R) have no relation to each other, they were just assigned by scientists in various ways. The mtdna letters were assigned more or less in chronological order, that is, whenever a scientist discovered a new haplogroup, he would use the next letter of the alphabet. This explains why there is no structure in the haplogroup names, and, say, X and W do not have any particular relation to each other. Y chromosome names instead are assigned more or less in a tree-like fashion, that is letters down in the alphabets tend to represent branches down in the tree. So for instance K is the father of all haplogroups with letters K to R. (As it happens, Y chromosome haplogroups only go to the letter R, so there is no Y chromosome haplogroup X...)

      cacio

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cacio
        girlperson1:
        The letter names associated with mtdna or Y (eg mtdna haplogroup X, or Y-chromosome haplogroup R) have no relation to each other, they were just assigned by scientists in various ways.

        cacio
        One thing I have always found quite confusing is that both Y DNA J and mtDNA J are from the Fertile Crescent, so in a sense they are male and female equivalents of each other.

        We are always told that descendants of the woman known as mtDNA J ("Jasmine" in Oxford Ancestors terminology) were the first European farmers in Neolithic times, about 10,000 years ago, but what Y DNA haplogroups did those men belong to? It seems likely that most of them would have belonged to the Y DNA J group that originated in the same part of the world at an earlier date, surely?

        Harry

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        • #5
          Originally posted by girlperson1
          If Haplogroup X represents mtDNA, what haplogroup or haplotype represents X in the Y-DNA? In other words, would my blood brother also be Haplogroup X like myself or would he have a different group or type name?
          Mt haplo X has two broad branches, Eurasian and Native American, or Old World and New World. If your genealogy was 'purely' Old World, both your parents had Old World pedigrees, then your Eurasian X would be accompanied, in your brother, by any of a number of Eurasian Y's incident in your Old World source population. If, however, your genealogy was 'purely' New World, both parents had New World pedigrees, then your Native American X would be accompanied, in your brother, by a C or Q haplogroup, the only two Y haplogroups recognized as unequivocably Native American.
          Last edited by tomcat; 12 August 2007, 02:00 PM.

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          • #6
            tomcat:

            it seems J is one of the few cases of good match between X and Y. I think Semino argues that Y-hap J (especially J2a) is indeed a sign of neolithic colonization of Europe. I know less of mtdna J. However, note that J is not the most common mtdna haplogroup in Anatolia-Middle East either. H and U are. But since these two haplogroups are the most common in Europe too, there is no gradient with them as there is with J, and one has to go to a deeper subgroup level to analyze possible neolithic contributions. (eg U1 and U3 versus U5).

            cacio

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            • #7
              I am J on both sides and I don't how the letters were originally assigned but I suspect it was coincidence. They followed somewhat different pathways in Europe with Y dna J staying around the Mediterranian but Mtdna J having eastern European, Danubian as well as Mediterranian branches. Ironically as Ashkenazi Jews moved to eastern Europe some members of that population were double Js, not because of the Middle Eastern connection but because of the European Mtdna connection. There should also be double Js around the Mediterranian and to a lesser extent near the Caucasus and Black Sea areas.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by hdw
                One thing I have always found quite confusing is that both Y DNA J and mtDNA J are from the Fertile Crescent, so in a sense they are male and female equivalents of each other.
                ...
                It is a matter of semantics. And I can't see how the matter is illuminated by calling co-incident Y and Mt haplogroups, anywhere, equivalent. The sex-typing chromosomes, X and Y, are equivalent in that they both type for sex. But Y does little beyond typing for maleness while X has many other functions in addition for typing for femaleness. All humans have Mt-DNA, all humans have at least one X Chr, but only human males have Y.

                The only thing alike between Y and Mt-DNA is they don't recombine. But the clock for Mt-DNA SNP's must tick much, much slower than the STR clock in Y-DNA.

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