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  • Cat mtdna

    I don't remember if this has already been posted (one cannot search the forum for the word "cat"), but anyway, for cat lovers, here's the story.

    A recent article on Science (The near eastern origin of cat domestication) discovered the mtdna tree of cats (at least the broad branches, they only sequenced 2000 or so base pairs in the coding region).

    All domestic cats belong to macro-haplogroup IV (latin numeral, as in 4), which is also the same mtdna of Near Eastern wild cats. This supports the near eastern origin of domestic cats - a feline "out of Arabia". Wild cats though still exist, which accounts for the other haplogroups of the species. The European wild cats belong to macro-haplogroup I (as in one). Because domesticated cats often become feral, haplogroup IV is present, at various frequencies, among all wild cat populations. (The opposite though is not true, domestic cats have no I, II, or III).

    In terms of coalescence, Cat-Eve is estimated to be 230K years old (ie older than our mitochondrial Eve). No info on where she lived. Euro wild cats (haplogroup I) separated may be around 200K years ago. Macro-haplogroup IV is estimated to be 131K years old. Domestication thus involved several lineages within IV, not a unique one, and preserved a certain mitochondrial diversity.

    Among other tidbits of information, the article claims that European wild cats' dna also shows a post glacial expansion from an Iberian refugium. In a graph, the article also shows the haplogroups within macro-haplogroups IV, called A through E, but I didn't see any particular discussion about them.

    No word yet on whether a cat mtdna test will be available anytime soon, though this seems an obvious business opportunity, above all if one could connect the mtdna to specific breeds. I don't own a cat, so I don't know what I would do. Anybody here would test their cat's mtdna?

    cacio

  • #2
    I know that DNA genealogy can get addictive, (and I even read about a lady spying on someone with the same surname and picking up their garbage just to get at their DNA), but when we start testing our pets, I think it's time for DNA Testing Rehab.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Pleroma
      I know that DNA genealogy can get addictive, (and I even read about a lady spying on someone with the same surname and picking up their garbage just to get at their DNA), but when we start testing our pets, I think it's time for DNA Testing Rehab.
      I never thaught I would ever stoop this low, but there are some people in my family that refuse to fork over their DNA. We have 2 fraudlent adoptions.One being my grandmother who refuses to admit she gave birth to my mother and put her up for adoption. Thanks for the garbage idea.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Yaffa
        I never thaught I would ever stoop this low, but there are some people in my family that refuse to fork over their DNA. We have 2 fraudlent adoptions.One being my grandmother who refuses to admit she gave birth to my mother and put her up for adoption. Thanks for the garbage idea.
        I heard on tv that someone bought an empty can of soda fished out of the garbage that Paris Hilton drank from (I'm assuming she would have used a straw) while in prison. I instantly thought that it was to test her dna. Or maybe fingerprints?

        If I had a strand of hair from my father I'd like to have that tested.
        About garbage....someone's been putting garbage in my can for weeks now.
        A big clue: someone who eats at IHOP. Maybe it's someone on a diet but they are hiding their stuff in my garbage can.

        On topic...when did domestic cats become domestic cats? Do they all have same mdna?

        I had read something about all pet hamsters being related.
        Last edited by rainbow; 4 August 2007, 10:04 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rainbow
          I heard on tv that someone bought an empty can of soda fished out of the garbage that Paris Hilton drank from (I'm assuming she would have used a straw) while in prison. I instantly thought that it was to test her dna. Or maybe fingerprints?

          If I had a strand of hair from my father I'd like to have that tested.
          About garbage....someone's been putting garbage in my can for weeks now.

          On topic...when did domestic cats become domestic cats? Do they all have same mdna.

          I had read something about all pet hamsters being related.
          Now that's some DNA REHAB if you need Paris Hilton's used coke can especially if she is not even in your family bloodline.

          I wish I had a strand of my father's hair too. My alleged sister who I am tkaing the X test with had given me permission to exhume my father but it was around $7,000. On top of that he is buried in Deerfield Bea, Fl and has been soaking in water for 23 yrs. He was not buried in an air tight seal. I spoke with forensic specialists on the matter and they told me it was neer impossible to get DNA from a body that has been soaking in water for a long period of time and I would be taking a huge financial risk.

          Hamsters and cats related? Thats intresting!

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          • #6
            Domestic cats: 131,000 years ago. IV is the mito of Cat-Eve. Several more mitos since.

            People had to have come from where cats are from, the Near East.

            I think people started in the Near East, some went to Africa early on, others later doubled back to the Near East and then wandered off "Mr. Magoo-style" all around the globe.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Yaffa
              Hamsters and cats related? Thats intresting!

              Sorry, I didn't mean to each other.
              I meant that I had read about hamsters before, another type of pet.
              I had wondered why no one ever studied the cat, and now I know someone did.

              Dogs come from wolves, don't they?

              Comment


              • #8
                rainbow:

                I read too that all domestic hamsters descend from a single brood collected in the Syrian (or Israeli?) desert in the 1930s. So that's quite recent. But I don't remember where I read that.

                As for cats, they became domesticated with agriculture, around 10,000 years ago, in the middle east. The article mentioned above however didn't directly show this, because domestication involved several cats, whose mtdna, as you say, shows a common ancestor much futher back.

                I don't remember reading anything about dogs mtdna. If this hasn't happened yet, I guess this will soon. I think I read somewhere that dogs may have been domesticated earlier than other animals, because they are useful for hunters.

                cacio

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yesbut I cantell by looksI thinkI knowcats breed

                  Originally posted by cacio
                  I don't remember if this has already been posted (one cannot search the forum for the word "cat"), but anyway, for cat lovers, here's the story.

                  A recent article on Science (The near eastern origin of cat domestication) discovered the mtdna tree of cats (at least the broad branches, they only sequenced 2000 or so base pairs in the coding region).

                  All domestic cats belong to macro-haplogroup IV (latin numeral, as in 4), which is also the same mtdna of Near Eastern wild cats. This supports the near eastern origin of domestic cats - a feline "out of Arabia". Wild cats though still exist, which accounts for the other haplogroups of the species. The European wild cats belong to macro-haplogroup I (as in one). Because domesticated cats often become feral, haplogroup IV is present, at various frequencies, among all wild cat populations. (The opposite though is not true, domestic cats have no I, II, or III).

                  In terms of coalescence, Cat-Eve is estimated to be 230K years old (ie older than our mitochondrial Eve). No info on where she lived. Euro wild cats (haplogroup I) separated may be around 200K years ago. Macro-haplogroup IV is estimated to be 131K years old. Domestication thus involved several lineages within IV, not a unique one, and preserved a certain mitochondrial diversity.

                  Among other tidbits of information, the article claims that European wild cats' dna also shows a post glacial expansion from an Iberian refugium. In a graph, the article also shows the haplogroups within macro-haplogroups IV, called A through E, but I didn't see any particular discussion about them.

                  No word yet on whether a cat mtdna test will be available anytime soon, though this seems an obvious business opportunity, above all if one could connect the mtdna to specific breeds. I don't own a cat, so I don't know what I would do. Anybody here would test their cat's mtdna?

                  cacio
                  Yep I would ,if I had more spending cash. I always wanted to know what my cat was.I thought he looked to be a Maine Coon,which is said to be a Turkish Angora mixed with an American Shorthair,and also said to be bred in the state of Maine 200 years ago.Actually my cat is dead now, he was 20 something years old,but I still have his body,and it don't smell bad(in the yard,neatly wrapped).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It seems it may indeed be possible to test cat's DNA:

                    http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/fa...meHomepage.htm

                    cacio

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      RE Iberian refugium for EU wildcats

                      Wild birds too had an Iberian Refugium, as well as a SE Europe one. After the Big Melt they converged from their two refugia in central Europe as separate species or subspecies.In other words a species that split to two different refugia may have diverged enough to not interbreed when the two populations met again after the Ice Age. I suppose there is some sort of lesson there for humans.

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