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  • rainbow
    replied
    Originally posted by Joe McCulloch
    How many people in this group have family history that speaks of Native American ancestory but after having DNA Print find that they are of East Asian decent?
    Thanks
    Joe
    Wow this is an old thread. From 2003?

    My situation is different. I expected either 100% European, or 97%-98% European & 2%-3% East Asian. I wanted to know if I had Mongolian or Hun on my fathers side. He is half Czech on his fathers side, and his other half, from his mothers side, is Colonial American from Dutch, English, Scottish, French, and German. I had read that Eastern Europeans get 10% East Asian in their results. A quarter of that would be 2% to 3%.
    My result was 83% European & 17% Native American. Totally unexpected and a total mystery. Later on my mom tested and got ZERO Native American. That means my father would have to be about 34% Native American. I have no known Native American ancestry on his side. It must be from my fathers mother. It's either that or I have a whole lotta "Central Asian" in the Slavic part. Ancestry By Dna told me in an email that their Native American markers coincide with Central Asian markers.

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  • Jambalaia32
    replied
    Native Amers are Esat Asians

    Originally posted by Joe McCulloch
    How many people in this group have family history that speaks of Native American ancestory but after having DNA Print find that they are of East Asian decent?
    Thanks
    Joe
    Native Americans are FROM East Asia ain't they? That's where they came from before they came to American across the land Bridge over near Alaska,that's what all the scientists say. Native Americans are theoretically one of the tribes of East Asia.

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  • tomcat
    replied
    Originally posted by TAZyaqui
    How do you know your Native American percentage? I was tested and it said I was of Haplogroup C.
    The percentage ancestry test is Ancestry by DNA 2.5. You can learn much more about the test and order it, if you choose, at:

    www.ancestrybydna.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Percentage?

    How do you know your Native American percentage? I was tested and it said I was of Haplogroup C.

    Leave a comment:


  • barbara
    replied
    Ana, Thank you for the ftdna.com link! I have been waiting since the extraction dated oct 03 2003 with no reasonable explanation re:the delay.It is now 2004 Now I read there is a transitional process underway, and no telling when the results will be in. I am also mixed Native American [ Illinois] On the genealogy path trying to track this. I do hope its worth the wait. Barbara

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  • casadecoqui
    replied
    Juan, one of our maternal ancestors was born in Santo Domingo. Believe it or not, another ancestor was Juan de Viloria who was one of the founders of Santo Domingo.

    Look in the FTDNA surname projects under P and look for the Puerto Rican project. You can come join our project and at least get a lower rate. Who knows, one of your ancestors could have emigrated to PR and you might match with someone in the group. You might have more relatives than you know.

    Pa'lante siempre!
    Ana


    Originally posted by JuanT
    Oh my Ana, this will keep me up for a quite a few more days! Thank you very much. I dont know what my haplo types are. Pues como comienzo, mi hermano y yo no interesamos en esto hace poco. Nosotros somos cibaenos de la RD. Ya se de los estudios que se han realizados en Puerto Rico y en RD sobre los haplo typos. Pero tambien veo que algunos tienen el haplo typo pero cuando se hacen el BGA test salen negativos........dios mio que raro es todo esto! Im going to surf the net for these sites you gave me right now.
    Thank you
    Juan

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Oh my Ana, this will keep me up for a quite a few more days! Thank you very much. I dont know what my haplo types are. Pues como comienzo, mi hermano y yo no interesamos en esto hace poco. Nosotros somos cibaenos de la RD. Ya se de los estudios que se han realizados en Puerto Rico y en RD sobre los haplo typos. Pero tambien veo que algunos tienen el haplo typo pero cuando se hacen el BGA test salen negativos........dios mio que raro es todo esto! Im going to surf the net for these sites you gave me right now.
    Thank you
    Juan

    Leave a comment:


  • casadecoqui
    replied
    Juan here are some very interesting articles that might help you understand
    the admixture situation better.
    You'll find them by registering for free at:
    http://www.pubmed.com

    Once registered, you can either search for all by putting in "Founder Amerinidian Haplotypes" like I did or using the titles of the articles below, or searching by the author.

    1. Mitochondrial DNA studies show asymmetrical Amerindian admixture in Afro-Colombian and Mestizo populations.
    Rodas C, Gelvez N, Keyeux G
    Hum Biol 2003 Feb, 75:13-30

    2. Possible migration routes into South America deduced from mitochondrial DNA studies in Colombian Amerindian populations.
    Keyeux G, Rodas C, Gelvez N, Carter D
    Hum Biol 2002 Apr, 74:211-33

    3. Correlation between molecular and conventional genealogies in Aicuña: a rural population from Northwestern Argentina.
    Bailliet G, Castilla EE, Adams JP, Orioli IM, Martínez-Marignac VL, Richard SM, Bianchi NO
    Hum Hered 2001, 51:150-9

    4. mtDNA history of the Cayapa Amerinds of Ecuador: detection of additional founding lineages for the Native American populations.
    Rickards O, Martínez-Labarga C, Lum JK, De Stefano GF, Cann RL
    Am J Hum Genet 1999 Aug, 65:519-30

    5. Further comments on the characterization of founder Amerindian mitochondrial haplotypes.
    Bianchi NO, Bailliet G
    Am J Hum Genet 1997 Jul, 61:244-7

    6. Phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA lineages in South American mummies.
    Monsalve MV, Cardenas F, Guhl F, Delaney AD, Devine DV
    Ann Hum Genet 1996 Jul, 60 ( Pt 4):293-303

    7. mtDNA variation indicates Mongolia may have been the source for the founding population for the New World.
    Merriwether DA, Hall WW, Vahlne A, Ferrell RE
    Am J Hum Genet 1996 Jul, 59:204-12

    8. mtDNA variation in the Chibcha Amerindian Huetar from Costa Rica.
    Santos M, Ward RH, Barrantes R
    Hum Biol 1994 Dec, 66:963-77

    9. Founder mitochondrial haplotypes in Amerindian populations.
    Bailliet G, Rothhammer F, Carnese FR, Bravi CM, Bianchi NO
    Am J Hum Genet 1994 Jul, 55:27-33


    Enjoy!
    Ana

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  • casadecoqui
    replied
    No problem, Juan. If you have any other questions, I can try and help.

    There is an excellent article concerning admixture in South American groups (I think it was Columbia) which explained the special situation which occurred there. I have to look for the URL for you. and let you know.

    A site you should definitely visit and bookmark is:
    http://www.kacike.org

    This site has many articles re the populations in the Caribe and the haplogroups which are found there.

    BTW, what is your haplotype? and what names are you researching and which location are your ancestors from?

    Ana

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hello Ana, Somehow I unsubscribed to this thread! as you can already tell, im not very computer savy and definately not having an easy time understanding DNA. You have been very helpful and I thank you.
    Juan

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thank you Ana, that kinda clears things up a bit
    I see however that this can work either direction. From what I read you are from Puerto Rico and the population there has been mixing for a long time. In any given family you have a broad range of features from Native American to African, and European. If a people living in an Indian village continually marry outsiders and these newcomers either African or Spanish, then in time the Indian genes would be diluted, although it may show up in some individuals. But suppose the the mixture took place a long time ago as it has in the Caribbean or Brazil and these mixed blood people continue marrying within their same population, within their village, then the original percentages would still be there and shold show up in tests. Also how can people look Indian or African and still test negative for these population groups.
    This is really exciting and although it raises more questions than it answers it (at least for me!) I still think it is a powerful tool.
    Thanks again
    Juan

    Leave a comment:


  • casadecoqui
    replied
    It is exactly that, Juan. The DNAPrint tests the other autosomes for specific sequences not the X or Y chromosome. From these autosomes you receive a portion of your ancestry from all your ancestors. It depends how far back that particular ancestor was which determines what you will receive.

    For instance, five generations ago, you had 32 ancestors, but 10 generations ago you had 1024 ancestors. They all contributed to your ancestry.

    You and your siblings should technically receive 50 % of your ancestry from each parent, 25% from each of your 4 grandparents, 12.5 % from your 8 great grandparents, 6.25 % from your 16 great great grandparents, etc. But you and a brother or sister may not receive exactly the same percentage of each ancestry. For instance, if you were looking for Native American and knew it came from both sides, then the % of NA should be greater. If the Native American comes from only one great grandparent or an even older ancestor, it would be diluted by the time you received it and it might not show up at all. There is a +/- 2.5% margin of error in the DNAPrint in determining ancestry up to 6 generations. Also, it is entirely possible that you might receive some, little or none of that ancestry as compared to a sibling. They might show 80% Indo European and 20% NA while you have (like my values) 76% and 24% EA.

    I hope this helps. The DNAPrint seems to be very accurate in determining major ancestry. However, if you have say a small percentage such as 5 % of either NA/EA or SA it may not show up at all on the DNAPrint because there is a 5% margin of error. It may therefore show up as 0%.

    I think I have that right and hope I did not confuse you.

    For a better understanding of the DNAPrint, you might want to read this page:

    http://www.ftdna.com/faqdnaprint.html

    Hope this helps!
    Ana


    Originally posted by JuanT
    Hello,
    I gather that the tests that are being done now are not too accurate from what I have read on these pages. I thought this was going to help me clear things up, now im more confused than ever.
    Ana, is it possible that perhaps since you are mixed, as am I, and this mixture has been going on for many generations, then maybe only what is dominant in your lineage shows up?
    Another tests? More expensive I presume.
    Thank you
    Juan

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Hello,
    I gather that the tests that are being done now are not too accurate from what I have read on these pages. I thought this was going to help me clear things up, now im more confused than ever.
    Ana, is it possible that perhaps since you are mixed, as am I, and this mixture has been going on for many generations, then maybe only what is dominant in your lineage shows up?
    Another tests? More expensive I presume.
    Thank you
    Juan

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks Ana,
    It is good to hear of others. Keep digging.
    Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!
    Joe

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  • casadecoqui
    replied
    Hi, Joe:

    That has been a very hot topic of discussion on the Genealogy-DNA-L list for some time now. I am one of those individuals who has a solid paper trail and turned out to be 76% Indo European, 24 % EA and 0% AF. However, my group is L1c through mtDNA.

    I am descended from the first Spanish colonists to the island as well as to Criollos and blacks on both paternal and maternal lines. I was born in Puerto Rico and am therefore Amerindian. We have documentation up to 13-15 generations in some lines. Am hoping that the addition of more markers to DNA Print 2.5 will clarify things further.

    For the time being, all we can do is wait until it becomes available.

    Hope we can improve the percentages and shake things up when all the new tests are run.

    Happy Thanksgiving!
    Ana

    Leave a comment:

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