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MtDNA Haplogroup X

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  • #16
    Originally posted by A.Lock
    My haplo showed Q and R1b Native American. I thought R1b was european?
    Yes, you are correct - R1b is primarily European.
    The Native American with the R1b haplogroup would have had a European ancestor at some point along their paternal line (perhaps many generations back and unknown to the person tested).

    Angela.

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    • #17
      inheriting different amounts from different ethnic groups

      Originally posted by Lucy
      So, if you are from a mixed background as you describe, I guess the only thing DNAPrint can do is satisfy a curiosity as to how much DNA you have physically inherited from each of the ethnic groups. Personally, I find this information valuable as certain medical conditions tend to be associated with certain ethnic groups and for health reasons it is good to know.
      That would be nice, I agree- but one thing I've wondered about is whether it really tells you how much you've inherited from each of the ethnic groups - or just tells you which of those few markers are tested that you inherited. Presumably, ethnic groups differ on many markers in addition to those tested. If only a small percent is tested, then it could give an inaccurate view of how much of each ethnic group one really inherited.

      It would be also nice if we know what the markers they test are believe to code for. If it's things like eye and skin color, we can just look in the mirror.
      (forgetting phenotype vs genotype issues for the moment). And some things would be more useful (medical) and of interest than others to know which side of the family we got.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by penguin
        That would be nice, I agree- but one thing I've wondered about is whether it really tells you how much you've inherited from each of the ethnic groups - or just tells you which of those few markers are tested that you inherited. Presumably, ethnic groups differ on many markers in addition to those tested. If only a small percent is tested, then it could give an inaccurate view of how much of each ethnic group one really inherited.

        It would be also nice if we know what the markers they test are believe to code for. If it's things like eye and skin color, we can just look in the mirror.
        (forgetting phenotype vs genotype issues for the moment). And some things would be more useful (medical) and of interest than others to know which side of the family we got.
        Check the following link:

        http://appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-...RS=20040229231

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Lucy
          The reason you are probably showing up as 100% Indo European is because all succeeding generations after your great-grandmother have been Indo-Eurpean.

          Lets do a little math here...
          3x Great Grandmother-- 100% Native American
          2x Great Grandmother -- 50% Native American
          1x Great Grandmother -- 25% Native American
          Grandmother -- 12.5% Native American
          Mother -- 6% Native American
          You -- 3% Native American
          With the error rate allowed in the DNAPrint, you could easily end up with 0% Native American.

          Also, the above calculations assume that each individual has inherited exactly half of DNA markers of the previous generation. Since DNAPrint is based on combined DNA, each child's results are going to be different based on the random pairing of their mother's and father's DNA i.e. each child of each generation could be "more" or "less" Native American depending on whether they inherited the European or the Native American marker.

          Think of the bell curve in any simple probability and statistics course. At the height of the bell curve is the probability that you will inherit 50% of a specific ethnic groups markers, but however, there is also is a probabilty that you will also inherit more or less of the markers. Remember, this random pairing and % more/less occurs for EACH generation.

          Hope this helps with out getting too complicated.

          So, what does it mean when you get 61 percent Native American on the DNAPrint? Does it mean all four grandparents were full blooded Native American or mostly full blooded? I'm confused about how a high percentage is added up.

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          • #20
            Meiosis

            Originally posted by haplogroupc
            So, what does it mean when you get 61 percent Native American on the DNAPrint? Does it mean all four grandparents were full blooded Native American or mostly full blooded? I'm confused about how a high percentage is added up.
            I disagree with that quote from Lucy about the way she tries to quantify the genetic contribution of your ancestors by percentages. That's similar to the way in which traditional racial nomenclature was derived.

            You see, in sexual reproduction, each offspring gets a unique gene combination or set of genes from each parent. There is some randomness involved in the formation of every reproductive cell, the genetic material selection varies with each new haploid cell, otherwise every sibling of the same parents would be identical. Then after egg fertilization by the sperm, homologous chromosomes from each parent cell pair up and actually exchange genetic material in a process known as crossing over that further shuffles the genes. All this is part of what is known as meiosis.

            You can read a better explanation about Meiosis here.

            IMO, there’s no way you can get genetic percentages of your ancestry simply by genealogical records. Even your phenotype can not be used as a predictor of your ancestral composition because a whole human being is much more than just skin, hair, eye, etc., that is, much more than what is visible on the outside.

            And finally the phenomenon of gene expression, where some genes are dominant and some are recessive, should not be confused with the type of quantification performed by the DNAPrint.

            I hope I didin't confuse you even more.
            Last edited by Victor; 1 May 2005, 10:01 PM.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Victor
              I disagree with that quote from Lucy about the way she tries to quantify the genetic contribution of your ancestors by percentages. That's similar to the way in which traditional racial nomenclature was derived.

              You see, in sexual reproduction, each offspring gets a unique gene combination or set of genes from each parent. There is some randomness involved in the formation of every reproductive cell, the genetic material selection varies with each new haploid cell, otherwise every sibling of the same parents would be identical. Then after egg fertilization by the sperm, homologous chromosomes from each parent cell pair up and actually exchange genetic material in a process known as crossing over that further shuffles the genes. All this is part of what is known as meiosis.

              You can read a better explanation about Meiosis here.

              IMO, there’s no way you can get genetic percentages of your ancestry simply by genealogical records. Even your phenotype can not be used as a predictor of your ancestral composition because a whole human being is much more than just skin, hair, eye, etc., that is, much more than what is visible on the outside.

              And finally the phenomenon of gene expression, where some genes are dominant and some are recessive, should not be confused with the type of quantification performed by the DNAPrint.

              I hope I didin't confuse you even more.
              From what I understand, the post from Lucy is correct, as well as the post from Victor. Lucy's scenario would be correct in that the percentages will be close to those, but will deviate from those numbers based on random assortment of genes. Although you will not measure exactly those percentages, you and full siblings will test 'around' those percentages, each sibling testing for a slightly different percentage.

              Comment


              • #22
                What's M45b?

                Originally posted by AngelaC
                Yes, you are correct - R1b is primarily European.
                The Native American with the R1b haplogroup would have had a European ancestor at some point along their paternal line (perhaps many generations back and unknown to the person tested).

                Angela.
                Don't bet on it.
                http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/pic...8&blobtype=pdf

                DYS19. DYS388. DYS390. DYS391. DYS392. DYS393. 14. 12. 24. 11. 13. 13.

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