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  • MtDNA Haplogroup X

    My MtDNA results came back as follows;

    HVR1 Haplogroup X
    HVR1 Mutations 16183C
    16189C
    16223T
    16278T
    16519C


    My GGG Grandmother was of nativie american origin, however, I no little else of that side of my family. The MtDNA Haplogroup X seems to collaborate this claim. However, my DNAPRINT results
    indicate that I am 100% IndoEuropean.

    My question is, does the DNAPRINT test not consider the X haplogroup to be of native american decent? Is this because the X Haplogroup arrived 10,000 years after the original Native American Haplogroups and are considered not to be Native American at all when defining the DNAPRINT map?

  • #2
    The reason you are probably showing up as 100% Indo European is because all succeeding generations after your great-grandmother have been Indo-Eurpean.

    Lets do a little math here...
    3x Great Grandmother-- 100% Native American
    2x Great Grandmother -- 50% Native American
    1x Great Grandmother -- 25% Native American
    Grandmother -- 12.5% Native American
    Mother -- 6% Native American
    You -- 3% Native American
    With the error rate allowed in the DNAPrint, you could easily end up with 0% Native American.

    Also, the above calculations assume that each individual has inherited exactly half of DNA markers of the previous generation. Since DNAPrint is based on combined DNA, each child's results are going to be different based on the random pairing of their mother's and father's DNA i.e. each child of each generation could be "more" or "less" Native American depending on whether they inherited the European or the Native American marker.

    Think of the bell curve in any simple probability and statistics course. At the height of the bell curve is the probability that you will inherit 50% of a specific ethnic groups markers, but however, there is also is a probabilty that you will also inherit more or less of the markers. Remember, this random pairing and % more/less occurs for EACH generation.

    Hope this helps with out getting too complicated.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you Lucy for the reply.
      So, let me see if I understand this.
      If you already know the ethnic makeup of your Mothers Mothers Mothers Mother and your Fathers Fathers Fathers Father, then there would likely be no benefit from having the DNAPrint test done. From your post it seems it could take less than a hundred years to wipe out any reasonably measurable link to an ethnic background. Hindsight could have saved me a few bucks here.

      Anyway, maybe you could help on another question?

      My MtDNA results put me into a Haplogroup called X. I have been trying to understand the significance of Group X. If searching Yahoo! you might find articles about Haplogroup X saying it is linked with Atlantis, Ancient Summaria, and finally the Aliens who injected primates with an additional 223 chromosomes making us the great folks we are today. Obviously I find this to be funny. But seriously, I keep finding that Native Americans are of Haplogroup X and so are Europeans. I have found references to subgroups of Haplogroup X such as X1, X2, and X2a. These groups seem to make the distinction between a Native American ancestry and a European Ancestry. How can I find out what subgroup I belong to? And are there any forums or documents you can recommend?

      Comment


      • #4
        Haplogroup X

        Hi!

        I have almost the same mutations as you do. However, as I had Oxford Ancestors do my mtDNA testing, I don't know if I might also have the last mutation you have.

        If you email me, I have some info on Haplogroup X.

        I also am in the same boat as you in terms of the NA question. I don't believe I have a NA maternal ancestor, but as my maternal line has been in the US since the 1600's, it may be a possibility.

        Would love to hear from other's in the Haplogroup X, especially ones with mutations the same or similar to mine.

        Also, any information anyone might have on my mutations, which are also 16183, 16189, 16223, & 16278 would be much appreciated.

        JHS

        Comment


        • #5
          Hello, I have a question.
          If one comes from a population say like Honduras, where people of different races have been mixing for a long time, how can the DNA print test reveal a bonafide percentage of race? I read what Lucy posted above and it seems logical, provide that all the people in davisinvt lineage were all full blooded. But if they were mixed to begin with I dont see how a DNA test can give an accurate percentage.
          Thank you

          Comment


          • #6
            JuanT,

            I am by no means an authority on any of this, however, having had the DNAPrint test done I can tell you that all percentages will be broken down into only four groups;

            Indo-European
            East Asian
            Native-American
            African

            So, it seems that the test results would reflect some sort of percentage within the above four groups only. I ended up being
            100% Indo-European, which means to me that I have no American Indian, No African, and No Asian in me, at least in the last four or five generations or so. Hope that helps. By all means if someone else who is more informed than I can answer this, please do!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by davisinvt
              JuanT,

              I am by no means an authority on any of this, however, having had the DNAPrint test done I can tell you that all percentages will be broken down into only four groups;

              Indo-European
              East Asian
              Native-American
              African

              So, it seems that the test results would reflect some sort of percentage within the above four groups only. I ended up being
              100% Indo-European, which means to me that I have no American Indian, No African, and No Asian in me, at least in the last four or five generations or so. Hope that helps. By all means if someone else who is more informed than I can answer this, please do!

              Comment


              • #8
                Thank you Davisinvt,
                I am difinately not an expert, geez not even a novice yet! But I am gathering from all I am reading that the tests do not go back more than a few generations. If so, then in a mixed blood population of Native, African and European, all three would show or only the dominant strain?
                Thank you once again for taking the time to educate me in the ways of DNA :-)
                Juant

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well, rather than say that no Native American DNA would show up after a hundred years, I would rather say after about 5-6 generations. My family tends to have children quite late in life so it has been hanging around closer to 150 years

                  With regards to a subgroup of Haplogroup X, I really have no knowledge about that. My Native American heritage crosses gender, so no haplogroup will show it--although I am trying to trace down a distant female cousin whose DNA might show it.

                  However, I would like to say that FamilyTreeDNA is a business and from what I know about businesses, if there is a demand for information, they eventually supply it. Read that, don't be surprised that within a year or so additional "refinements" will be offered--got to keep that money coming in!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well, Juan. You are correct. When populations are mixed and have been mixed for some time, using DNAPrint to determine ethnicity of a particular ancestor would be some what useless.

                    For example, I fortunately tested an uncle from each side of my family (both my parents are deceased). They BOTH tested positive for Native American ancestry which was a surprise because no one had any knowledge of this. However, if I would have not tested them, and only would have tested myself on the DNAPrint, I came in at 20% NA and would have assumed that DNAPrint was wrong because at this percentage it would have meant that one of my grandmothers was 100% NA which I knew was not true.

                    So, if you are from a mixed background as you describe, I guess the only thing DNAPrint can do is satisfy a curiosity as to how much DNA you have physically inherited from each of the ethnic groups. Personally, I find this information valuable as certain medical conditions tend to be associated with certain ethnic groups and for health reasons it is good to know.

                    I noticed that you have quite a few posts. Are you starting to feel like, ¡Dios mío! Necessito una cabeza mas grande para compender todo de esto.

                    I know I do!! (Sorry, I can't figure out how to get my keybroard to print all the Spanish markings--especially the accent marks)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hi Lucy! Thank you for your reply.
                      I have learned a lot since I joined this message board, both you and Casadelcoqui have really taught me a lot. Thing is that the more I inquire and interview family members (something I had not actually done before) I get more and more references to Native background. I find it unlikey,but it will be very interesting to see the results. Whatever they turn out to be i sure its going to surpise my whole family! Hopefully this DNA thing will clear things up.
                      Thank you lucy.
                      Juan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Haplogroup X and Mutations

                        Dear Davisnit,
                        I hope I have that right. Long story short. We share the same Haplogroup and mutations. My mother's family on the matenal side is DeFrate. My mom told me they were French but research has pointed me in the direction of the Azores and then France and then America. Also they might have been Conversos or converted Shephardic Jews. There are also stories in the family that we are NA through the Ojebwa or Chippewa people. All these peoples share this haplogroup and some of these mutations. Have you learned anything new since 2003. Thanks, Flannie

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The Indo-European Gene?

                          Originally posted by davisinvt
                          However, my DNAPRINT results
                          indicate that I am 100% IndoEuropean.
                          Tacoma Writes:

                          Indo-European is a language.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Interesting, I found that Indo-European is defined as follows;

                            1. A family of languages consisting of most of the languages of Europe as well as those of Iran, the Indian subcontinent, and other parts of Asia.

                            2. A member of any of the peoples speaking an Indo-European language.

                            But whatever... Guess it depends on what dictionary you use.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My haplo showed Q and R1b Native American. I thought R1b was european?

                              Comment

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