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Jennings Surprised by German RAO & J2 SNP

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  • White Socks
    replied
    Originally posted by J Man
    Awesome stuff White Socks! Those are exactly the same results I got from DYS413. It will be interesting to see what your 445 result is.
    Ten Four.
    J Man,

    My DYS445 = 10.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Man
    replied
    Originally posted by White Socks
    Hey J Man,

    I just got one of my test results back and I'm DYS413=17-17. So far, I'm definitely J2a1. Cheers!

    In The Y-Haplogroup J DNA Project, Bonnie put me in the J2a1k/Pre-k testing category. Still waiting on DYS445 for clarification.

    Over and out.

    Awesome stuff White Socks! Those are exactly the same results I got from DYS413.

    It will be interesting to see what your 445 result is.

    Ten Four.

    Leave a comment:


  • White Socks
    replied
    Hey J Man,

    I just got one of my test results back and I'm DYS413=17-17. So far, I'm definitely J2a1. Cheers!

    In The Y-Haplogroup J DNA Project, Bonnie put me in the J2a1k/Pre-k testing category. Still waiting on DYS445 for clarification.

    Over and out.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Man
    replied
    I wonder if J2a and J2b arrived in Europe at the same time or different times?

    Leave a comment:


  • rsychev
    replied
    Originally posted by J Man
    That is strange eh. I remember from the Sengupta paper that he says that J2b may have even predated the Neolithic in India. That certainly is a lot different from what many geneticists have said about J2 sub clades before.
    Sengupta et al. 2006 spoken that diversity for J2b2-M241 is higher in southwest Asia, than in Turkey and on the Balkan. Accordingly, time of expansion is more, and it makes 13.8 thousand years for India. Cruciani et al. 2007 with the help of two various models of demographic expansion estimate age of J-M12 in Europe makes 4.1 and 4.7 thousand years. Similarly in Europe behaves and E-V13 (its expansion has taken place not earlier, than 5.3 thousand years ago). Thus it is supposed, that populations of the western Asia have introduced group E-V13 to the Balkan during last 17 thousand years and its TMRCA in the western Asia is 11.5 thousand years). Phylogeography groups J2b and E-V13 allows to assume, that migrations from Near East were directed mainly to the west Asia (down to India for J2b2), and therefrom have gone to Europe (through the Balkan).

    Leave a comment:


  • J Man
    replied
    Originally posted by rsychev
    For example, estimate of mutation M102 is 7000 years ago but Sengupta wrote time for J2b2 in India 12000 years ago... paradox?

    That is strange eh. I remember from the Sengupta paper that he says that J2b may have even predated the Neolithic in India. That certainly is a lot different from what many geneticists have said about J2 sub clades before.

    Leave a comment:


  • rsychev
    replied
    Originally posted by J Man
    Hard to say really Roman. I think the J2 that is found in India may have split off from the main J2 family that was in the Near East or Anatolia around 15,000 years ago. They then went on a seperate migration to the East.
    For example, estimate of mutation M102 is 7000 years ago but Sengupta wrote time for J2b2 in India 12000 years ago... paradox?

    Leave a comment:


  • J Man
    replied
    Originally posted by J Man
    Hard to say really Roman. I think the J2 that is found in India may have split off from the main J2 family that was in the Near East or Anatolia around 15,000 years ago. They then went on a seperate migration to the East.

    Our ancestors then later migrated west into Europe.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Man
    replied
    Originally posted by rsychev
    Hi friends!

    What do you think about found in India (Sengipta et al., 2006) diversity J2a1 and J2b2 (formerly J2e1) HG? And estimate time is 12 ka! What is it? First migration from Near East to India and back to Near East and to Balkan in the Neolithic period.

    Hard to say really Roman. I think the J2 that is found in India may have split off from the main J2 family that was in the Near East or Anatolia around 15,000 years ago. They then went on a seperate migration to the East.

    Leave a comment:


  • rsychev
    replied
    Hi friends!

    What do you think about found in India (Sengipta et al., 2006) diversity J2a1 and J2b2 (formerly J2e1) HG? And estimate time is 12 ka! What is it? First migration from Near East to India and back to Near East and to Balkan in the Neolithic period.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Jambalaia32
    I understand what you are saying.J2 is more of the Mediterranean,but people have migrated and lived in many places since ancient days.So that's why you see haplogroups all over.If you're half German that's a special hybrid case where you could be living in Either country since you've got two distinct parents. And it's not bad to change one's name-it's usually done to assimilate,not hide Jewish ancestry.But changing it would never the less conceal the origin for future offspring. All J's come from Greece -I thought?

    It is thought now that J2 most likely originated in either Anatolia or the Northern portion of the Fertile Crescent. J1 is thought to have originated in the more Southerly regions of the Near East. As for the original J* it is thought to have originated in the Zagros mountains area.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jambalaia32
    replied
    J2 is Mediterr.

    Originally posted by White Socks
    Thanks for the comments.

    Okay, even if J2 is found in England, my Recent Ancestral Origins exact match of Germany still goes against an authentic English heritage doesn't it? I don't get any matches at all for England or the United Kingdom until two-step mutations. Therefore, it still looks to me like a German immigrant/child anglicized their name to Jennings after moving from Germany to England and/or America.

    I really would like to know which parade to march in, hah.
    I understand what you are saying.J2 is more of the Mediterranean,but people have migrated and lived in many places since ancient days.So that's why you see haplogroups all over.If you're half German that's a special hybrid case where you could be living in Either country since you've got two distinct parents. And it's not bad to change one's name-it's usually done to assimilate,not hide Jewish ancestry.But changing it would never the less conceal the origin for future offspring. All J's come from Greece -I thought?

    Leave a comment:


  • J Man
    replied
    Originally posted by White Socks
    I've only had the SNP Deep Haplogroup test with the following results:

    M172+ M304+ M102- M12- M137- M158- M163- M166- M205- M267- M280- M339- M365- M367- M368- M369- M390- M47- M62- M67- M68- M92- M99-

    Are there other deep SNP tests available, which you would recommend? (besides the DYS413 and DYS445 I ordred, today).

    Those are the same results that I got from the Deep SNP test.

    Right now all you can really test is DYS413 and DYS445. There are no other SNPs left or worth testing right now.

    Leave a comment:


  • White Socks
    replied
    Originally posted by J Man
    Just wondering have you had the deep SNP tests done by FTDNA at all yet?
    I've only had the SNP Deep Haplogroup test with the following results:

    M172+ M304+ M102- M12- M137- M158- M163- M166- M205- M267- M280- M339- M365- M367- M368- M369- M390- M47- M62- M67- M68- M92- M99-

    Are there other deep SNP tests available, which you would recommend? (besides the DYS413 and DYS445 I ordred, today).

    Leave a comment:


  • J Man
    replied
    Originally posted by White Socks
    I wonder if that might be Roman or Greco-Roman. Just in case I turn out to be J2a1*, I wanted to get your learned opinion regarding the Dienekes' Anthropology Blog where it is suggested that J2a1 may have originated in Greece.

    Thanks

    Yes I remember reading about Dienekes throy on his blog about J2a1 originating in Greece. I have spoken with others about it including Bonnie Shrack and from what I have read it does not really seem to me very likely that our haplogroup originated there. Most likely our haplogroup J2a1* originated in Anatolia or another region in the Northern Fertile Crescent.

    Our haplogroup then spread out from the Near East or Anatolia during the Neolithic period. As you most likely know our own direct ancestors are credited by geneticists as being the first to people to start farming, which I think is pretty cool

    Just wondering have you had the deep SNP tests done by FTDNA at all yet?

    Leave a comment:

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