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What exactly is typical for a Caucasian?!

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  • What exactly is typical for a Caucasian?!

    Hi,
    Just wondering if someone can explain, because autosomally it seems to be a bit up in the air.
    DNAP classify South Asians as coming under Caucasian, but Tribes don't seem to.
    On my Mum's latest Tribes update, she got Indian world matches that are considered "above ordinary for a typical Caucasian, but within the 5-95 percentiles for Caucasians". So what does that mean?! Surely anyone with higher than 95 would actually be Indian, but aren't Indians classed as Caucasian?
    She also got 22% South Asian on DNAP, which seems to high for a NW European, looking at their literature and looking at peoples scores on blogs and stuff.
    Are these scores significant? Do they actually mean anything?

  • #2
    some thoughts

    Burto,
    I think that DNA Tribes recognizes Indians as Asian because they live in the continent of Asia. But they are actually caucasians in terms of their DNA, as DNA Print contends. They are related genetically and culturally to Europeans. When we say that someone speaks an Indo-European language, it means that their language is spoken by Europeans and Indians (and possibly Pakistanis and other SW Asians, I think). Euro and Indian languages are related, as are their DNA.
    Judy



    Originally posted by burto
    Hi,
    Just wondering if someone can explain, because autosomally it seems to be a bit up in the air.
    DNAP classify South Asians as coming under Caucasian, but Tribes don't seem to.
    On my Mum's latest Tribes update, she got Indian world matches that are considered "above ordinary for a typical Caucasian, but within the 5-95 percentiles for Caucasians". So what does that mean?! Surely anyone with higher than 95 would actually be Indian, but aren't Indians classed as Caucasian?
    She also got 22% South Asian on DNAP, which seems to high for a NW European, looking at their literature and looking at peoples scores on blogs and stuff.
    Are these scores significant? Do they actually mean anything?

    Comment


    • #3
      Jaranta is right.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for that...so are the scores Mum got anything special? Do they reflect an Indian ancestor somewhere quite recently?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by burto
          Hi,
          Just wondering if someone can explain, because autosomally it seems to be a bit up in the air.
          DNAP classify South Asians as coming under Caucasian, but Tribes don't seem to.
          On my Mum's latest Tribes update, she got Indian world matches that are considered "above ordinary for a typical Caucasian, but within the 5-95 percentiles for Caucasians". So what does that mean?! Surely anyone with higher than 95 would actually be Indian, but aren't Indians classed as Caucasian?
          She also got 22% South Asian on DNAP, which seems to high for a NW European, looking at their literature and looking at peoples scores on blogs and stuff.
          Are these scores significant? Do they actually mean anything?
          The DNAP results and the Tribes results support one another on the similarity of your mother's genetics to those of South Asians. That seems significant considering the tests use different marker sets and differing statistics.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Tomcat,
            So does this mean there is a traceable ancestor somewhere along the lines who's heritage is Indian? I'm searching for Roma down the maternal line, because I think based on what I found on Omnipop it is on that X. The other X had some Native American matches so I'm attributing that to Mum's US father. Just hope my theory has some grounding otherwise I could be searching for something that I won't find! But then it questions why would there be Native matches on the English side!
            We have typical surnames that the Roma in England adopted together with some elusive characters that were musicians that moved alot, but no hard evidence as yet. There are no records of a direct Indian ancestor coming over during the time of the British Empire. It would be nice to find to actually say "yes these tests were correct"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by burto
              Hi Tomcat,
              So does this mean there is a traceable ancestor somewhere along the lines who's heritage is Indian? I'm searching for Roma down the maternal line, because I think based on what I found on Omnipop it is on that X. The other X had some Native American matches so I'm attributing that to Mum's US father. Just hope my theory has some grounding otherwise I could be searching for something that I won't find! But then it questions why would there be Native matches on the English side!
              We have typical surnames that the Roma in England adopted together with some elusive characters that were musicians that moved alot, but no hard evidence as yet. There are no records of a direct Indian ancestor coming over during the time of the British Empire. It would be nice to find to actually say "yes these tests were correct"
              As I know that neither Tribes nor DNAP would answer the question about a South Asian ancestor unequivocally, I won't stick my neck out.

              As to Natives in the British Isles, Tribes finds their 'Mestizo' in all but 6 of the European populations covered in their Global Survey of February.

              But snooping after mysterious musician relatives that moved a lot is more
              interesting

              Comment


              • #8
                When I ran each allele through Omnipop etc. three alleles on one X have high matches to Native American...Caucasian is way down the list.
                Similarly three alleles on the other X show India matches with Caucasian way down the list.
                This is why, together with the fact we have an unknown US ancestor, I came to my conclusion.
                It would be nice to find an ancestor with South Asian connections just so we can say "that's where it came from!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by burto
                  When I ran each allele through Omnipop etc. three alleles on one X have high matches to Native American...Caucasian is way down the list.
                  Similarly three alleles on the other X show India matches with Caucasian way down the list.
                  This is why, together with the fact we have an unknown US ancestor, I came to my conclusion.
                  It would be nice to find an ancestor with South Asian connections just so we can say "that's where it came from!"
                  There are 8 possible combinations over 3 loci involving 1 allele at each locus, or 4 pairs of combinations where each combination has a reciprocal or mirror combination.

                  Just because alleles fall in columns under Amelogenin results (X, X or X, Y) is absolutely no guarantee that they came from those separate or respective lines - results are, or can be, all mixed-up.

                  You may also have noticed that allele results always have the lower allele value first. Nature, or reality, doesn't work that way either.

                  You might try all 8 combinations and see what comes-up.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So just because one allele is classified under one X, it doesn't mean it came from that parent's X? So alleles cross over?
                    Can you explain this in more detail? So the Indian matches and the NA matches could be both from Mum's Dad and they've mixed between both X's?
                    Can you explain what you mean by 8 combinations?
                    Sorry to sound dumb.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by burto
                      So just because one allele is classified under one X, it doesn't mean it came from that parent's X? So alleles cross over?
                      Can you explain this in more detail? So the Indian matches and the NA matches could be both from Mum's Dad and they've mixed between both X's?
                      Can you explain what you mean by 8 combinations?
                      Sorry to sound dumb.
                      On my report there are two columns, one headed by Allele 1 (Amelogenin) X and one by Allele 2 (Amelogenin) Y. But it would a Big Mistake for me to assume that all alleles in column 1/X came from my mother and all in column 2/Y came from my father.

                      I also note that all alleles under column 1/X have lower numerical values than those under column 2/Y. Clearly, the table is 'inviting' me to assume that Mom had daintier alleles than Dad. But that assumption would be another Big Mistake.

                      You cannot know from this table which allele came from which parent. At any marker a father's allele could be either in column 1 or column 2. And either parent may have contributed the longer allele.

                      The table of alleles is poorly laid-out, it is misleading, it leads one to make mistaken assumptions.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi Burto,

                        By Roma, do you mean Romany? When I lived in England in the mid '90's I remember watching a documentary (the English do great documentaries) about the Romany people and the theory was that they had LONG ago originated in India and migrated.

                        -Donna

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi Tomcat,
                          Why do they set them out like that then? Is it not possible to determine which alleles came from whom, so they just stuck them in anyhow?
                          Hi Donna Q,
                          Yeah that's who I meant the Romany....well I'll keep searching the maternal line and if I find anything I'll let you all know!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Question is?

                            Well, geez, don't that just complicate things then if you can't even say column 1 X might be my mother and column 2 X my dad. Your saying they are mixed between the 2 columes. Column 1 and 2 has both parents mixed. Are they equally mixed? Or could 1 column have more my dads with a few of my moms? And the same for my moms in column and a few of my dads?
                            Maria

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Maria_W
                              Well, geez, don't that just complicate things then if you can't even say column 1 X might be my mother and column 2 X my dad. Your saying they are mixed between the 2 columes. Column 1 and 2 has both parents mixed. Are they equally mixed? Or could 1 column have more my dads with a few of my moms? And the same for my moms in column and a few of my dads?
                              Right. Each columns are essentially a random mix.

                              Comment

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