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Can someone give me a primer on all of this?

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  • Can someone give me a primer on all of this?

    Ok, after looking at this forum for the first time, and then coming back a year later, i've gotten completely lost.

    Is there some sort of matrix, correlating x haplogroup with someone being French, or y haplogroup for someone being Phoenician, etc, etc?

    It seems that all of the data is random and scattered and driving me crazy, since i'm sort of the type of guy who wants to map things out before spending the money on the test, especially considering i've traced some of my family lines over 600 years and know the results i'd expect, to be able to compare them.



    Anyway, if there hasn't, it would be a good idea someone puts it together.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    jr76x:

    there is no such matrix in a single place/book/or webpage for all haplogroups, but there are many scientific papers that give information about the haplogroups present in many countries. If you have a specific country in mind, I think many people here can tell you more details about it.

    In general, though, you will not be able to determine a country of origin with certainty. Haplogroups moved around thousands of years ago, so the tend to be present in many neighboring countries.

    You could take a larger Y-chromosome test, such as one with 67 STR markers. This would allow you to get a much higher resolution. If you match or are very close to somebody at 67 markers, then you probably have a recent common origin (say less than 10 generations). So in principle this could tell you more. However, right now, there is no large database, so typically one has no such matches. Italy itself is not well covered, and of course even less is known of Albania. So, simply said, you are unlikely to find close matches at such resolution level.

    If you have $100 to spend, I would encourage you to take a basic Y dna test, but without expecting much, and then go from there. Also, if you have a specific country in mind, may be somebody here can have more information. Eg: are you thinking about Albania vs Southern Italy? If so, may be somebody, including myself, can dig out a paper on Albania and see what is known about it. In general, there are people in this forum who have studied specific countries, or specific haplogroups, and so they can be of great help.

    cacio

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jr76x
      Is there some sort of matrix, correlating x haplogroup with someone being French, or y haplogroup for someone being Phoenician, etc, etc?

      It seems that all of the data is random and scattered and driving me crazy, since i'm sort of the type of guy who wants to map things out before spending the money on the test, especially considering i've traced some of my family lines over 600 years and know the results i'd expect, to be able to compare them.
      Haplogroups, by themselves, are not absolutely confined to particular ethnic groups. Rather, each ethnic group has its own percentage profile of the haplogroups common within it. For example, a research paper says that 56% of Poles are in haplogroup R1a1, but that doesn't mean that a different haplogroup result is "wrong" or "not Polish".

      For greater precision you have to order more markers--preferably 67, but at least 37--and then compare others' genetic distances to you. So for example, my adopted cousin suspected that his father was of Czech ancestry. Here is his Ysearch neighbor list at 67 markers. A rather confusing mixture of British Isles (Ireland, England) and Slavic (Bohemia/Czech, Russia), with a French Canadian too. What does it mean? My best guess is that my cousin is indeed of Czech ancestry, but he and the other Slavs descend from Romanized Balkan men who wandered or fled northward after the fall of the Roman Empire. The British Isles neighbors descend from Balkan men hired by the Romans to staff their British forts.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by cacio
        there is no such matrix in a single place/book/or webpage for all haplogroups,
        You can come pretty close with Wikipedia though, in the last year people are really pooled the disparate research quite thoroughly there. Just type in "haplogroup", and follow whatever link is of interest.

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