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mtDNA Haplogroup K

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  • mtDNA Haplogroup K

    Hello All,

    I received my results today and learned that I am a part of Haplogroup K

    16093C-16224C-16311C-16519c

    Any info that I can find on this group seems to state that it found in small quantities across a broad spectrum of European and Mediterranean countries. Does anyone have any further ethnic insight into this group? My Grandmother was from Malta but her ethnicity was somewhat of a grey area. I meant to test my mothers father but I guess I need to get a sample from my Mothers Brother instead.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Canadian Ink
    Hello All,

    I received my results today and learned that I am a part of Haplogroup K

    16093C-16224C-16311C-16519c

    Any info that I can find on this group seems to state that it found in small quantities across a broad spectrum of European and Mediterranean countries. Does anyone have any further ethnic insight into this group? My Grandmother was from Malta but her ethnicity was somewhat of a grey area. I meant to test my mothers father but I guess I need to get a sample from my Mothers Brother instead.
    Hi.

    Of those four mutationns, the last three are shared by virtually everybody in haplogroup K. The first one is usually found in the large K1a subclade. There are exceptions; I have it and I'm in K1c2. But those exceptions usually have another mutation in HVR1. Assuming you tested with FTDNA, you are probably not in one of the three Ashkenazi Jewish subclades; so your ancestry is probably not from Eastern Europe. Also, I doubt if your ancestry is Scandinavian. That leaves a lot of territory. I recommend that you take the mtDNARefine test to get your HVR2 mutations; that might narrow it down or not. Most subclades are scattered over Europe.

    Your mother's brother should have the same mtDNA as you.

    You are invited to join our K Project by clicking on the blue Join button on your personal page. Let me know if you have any problems.

    Bill Hurst

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    • #3
      Response deleted, Bill beat me to it
      Last edited by efgen; 16 February 2007, 03:43 PM.

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      • #4
        Who do i need to test to find out my mothers father (my grandfathers) history?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Canadian Ink
          Who do i need to test to find out my mothers father (my grandfathers) history?
          You can test your mother's brother's Y-DNA to find out about your grandfather's paternal line.

          To find out about your grandfather's maternal line, you'll need to find a cousin or other relative who has a direct female line back to your grandfather's mother and have that relative take an mtDNA test. For instance, if your grandfather had a sister, then you could test his sister, or his sister's daughter or son, or the sister's daughter's daughter or son, etc. (A male can be tested as long as he has a direct female line back to the person you want to know about.)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Canadian Ink
            Hello All,

            I received my results today and learned that I am a part of Haplogroup K

            16093C-16224C-16311C-16519c

            Put your results into the Mitosearch database,(http://www.mitosearch.org/), and you will find that you have a boat-load of matches.

            You also have 99 matches in the Sorenson database, http://www.smgf.org/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Canadian Ink
              Hello All,

              I received my results today and learned that I am a part of Haplogroup K

              16093C-16224C-16311C-16519c

              Any info that I can find on this group seems to state that it found in small quantities across a broad spectrum of European and Mediterranean countries. Does anyone have any further ethnic insight into this group? My Grandmother was from Malta but her ethnicity was somewhat of a grey area. I meant to test my mothers father but I guess I need to get a sample from my Mothers Brother instead.

              Well hello there genetic cousin. Welcome to Katrine's Clan. If you have not yet read Brian Sykes "The Seven Daughters of Eve" I heartily recommend it. It will tell you much.
              Peace,
              Bob

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              • #8
                Some help for this K(atrine) as well please

                Hi all,

                I got tested with Oxford Ancestors and found to be haplogroup K. I have no information on what sub-clade I belong to though. Does anyone know how to work this out from the sequence: 093C, 186T, 192T, 224C, 311C, 354T? When I put this into mitosearch I seem to get matches with K1 and K2.

                Hope someone can help...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Stela Paya
                  Hi all,

                  I got tested with Oxford Ancestors and found to be haplogroup K. I have no information on what sub-clade I belong to though. Does anyone know how to work this out from the sequence: 093C, 186T, 192T, 224C, 311C, 354T? When I put this into mitosearch I seem to get matches with K1 and K2.

                  Hope someone can help...
                  Hi Stela,

                  Two of your mutations, 224C and 311C, are shared by virtually everybody in K. I just looked in my latest download from MitoSearch. 093C is usually (about 80%) found in the large K1a subclade. I don't see a 186T there, so it's probably just a personal or family mutation. I only see one example with 354T, in K1c, so that could be a possibilty - or that could just be another personal one. I do see a few with 192T. Two are in lower unnamed clusters of K1a which also contain the 195C mutation.

                  You might consider taking FTDNA's "Oxford mtConversion Plus" test described on this page: http://www.familytreedna.com/description.html#mtDNA That will fill out your HVR1 mutation list to probably include at least 16519C which most of us have. It will also give you your HVR2 mutations, which are actually more important for predicting subclades in K. An actual subclade designation would require the expensive full-sequence test, also called Mega or FGS.

                  Hope this helps.

                  Bill Hurst

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                  • #10
                    Hi Bill,

                    Thanks for all this useful information, and for taking the time to look through the database. I'll consider the conversion test...

                    Stela

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