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Margin Of Error

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Jim Denning
    EVEN MORE when the names in study are close the majority i have seen had substantual differences maybe a couple of markers here and there. you dont have to exact matches to all the others
    actualy these can show where branches broke of the tree trunk aka migrations to the states or big cities

    here is a better way of saying what i said your fmily for argument sake is from new york all your siblings stay there with dad. you move to LA. You have sons they do and so on as time goes by your line loses contact with NY.
    Whatever the change was between you and dad. thats the sign of your migration. people with that change will most probably be yours. you all will be related but your change will be highlighted by the separation. thus if your brothers lines move the same might happen. still all brothers but with a small change

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    • #17
      Originally posted by kaybee
      If you are not an exact match with your father, didn't the mutation just occur with you? How could it have occurred previously? Are you thinking you might look like a prior generation, before your father, that he mutated and you mutated back to an earlier state? That seems unlikely.
      .

      ydna has nothing to do with looks because the mixture comes from 4 sets of grandparents genes. and besides you are supposed to look and behave like your grandparents.i sure do

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      • #18
        I consider myself the "Southern" branch of the the Mallett's that descended from John Mallet, the Huguenot. My ancestors migrated down from CT to North Carolina about 8 generations back. I did not think that climate or where you lived had anything to do with mutation. I thought that it was just a random act that could occur at anytime. I'm I wrong?

        Mike Mallett

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Mike Mallett
          I consider myself the "Southern" branch of the the Mallett's that descended from John Mallet, the Huguenot. My ancestors migrated down from CT to North Carolina about 8 generations back. I did not think that climate or where you lived had anything to do with mutation. I thought that it was just a random act that could occur at anytime. I'm I wrong?
          No, you are not wrong.

          I think a little bit of miscommunication has developed in this thread, and I don't want to make it worse by trying to explain it. But climate and geography have not demonstrable impact on the rate of STR mutation.

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