Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Access to DNA of Anthro-human Remains

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Access to DNA of Anthro-human Remains

    Was wanting to know why there is little information available on the DNA sequences or Haplogroups of Mummies and other recent finds of anthro-human remains that can be compared against one's own Y and MtDNA results; is it because scientists, politicians, or the ecclesiastical authorities don't want these made public for fear of the proving or disproving of the Bible, or our very existence?

    Of particular interest to me are the frozen remains of the Scythian warrior found in Mongolia in about August of last year and the skeletal remains of the Giants of Gath found in Israel some years before [the latter featured in the DVD "In the Footsteps of Goliath"]? I have a vested interest in all.

  • #2
    Can't say what has been done with any remains mentioned. But did read a recent press-release at www.sciencedaily.com of a study that demonstrated one is more likely to get a usable DNA sample if extraction is done as soon as possible after exhumation - the subterranean environment better preserves the DNA of a specimen than all the procedures undertaken to preserve the specimen.

    Comment


    • #3
      How's this for a long-winded, multi- part reply?

      A) There's a really good overview of ancient DNA (aDNA) studies written by Connie Mulligan in the April 2006 issue of American Antiquity (of course, most of us here won't have access to it). Some of its points speak to your questions (the article's points appear in italics, the other comments are mine).

      1) It's difficult to get reliable results from samples because of preservation and contamination problems - sampling just won't be possible in many cases.
      2) This research is expensive - Most archaeological projects will not have any funding for aDNA analysis, and so it's likely that it will only be carried out in the context of large, well-funded projects, projects that at least have an aDNA component built into them, or a study carried out by a genetic anthropologist who's interested in certain excavated remains.
      3) These studies require highly trained and experienced molecular geneticists - this, combined with the fact that many geneticists will be focused on other research means that the number of researchers conducting aDNA studies is still relatively small.

      Because of these factors there isn't a huge database of aDNA out there.


      B) There are aDNA results that have been published. I just read a couple of studies the other day that compared the mtDNA haplogroups of prehistoric, historic (A.D. 600-800), and contemporary populations in the Basque Country.

      C) The two cases you mentioned specifically: I would imagine that they have or will try to sample the Scythian warrior. If they have, the results just haven't been published yet. The excavations at Tel es-Sa’idiyeh (the site mentioned in "In the Footsteps of Goliath") were conducted before aDNA studies were really a practical idea. They may go back and try some sampling, who knows? With or without aDNA, it will probably be a while until the final report on the cemetery is issued because they have over 500 burials to analyze.
      Last edited by augustin25; 25 January 2007, 02:54 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        There are at least two projects in what was ancient Canaan that deal with dna. According to an anecdotal report (on another thread) of a National Geographic study of Phoenicia, J2 has been found in the remains. There also is a study in southern Israel (I think it was in Ashkelon--once occupied by Philistines). No results have been reported yet.

        Comment


        • #5
          DNA and the Biblical Giant Goliath

          Originally posted by augustin25
          How's this for a long-winded, multi- part reply? ......
          C) The two cases you mentioned specifically: I would imagine that they have or will try to sample the Scythian warrior. If they have, the results just haven't been published yet. The excavations at Tel es-Sa’idiyeh (the site mentioned in "In the Footsteps of Goliath") were conducted before aDNA studies were really a practical idea. They may go back and try some sampling, who knows? With or without aDNA, it will probably be a while until the final report on the cemetery is issued because they have over 500 burials to analyze.
          augustin25, you seem pretty-well up to speed about "In the Footsteps of Goliath" and the excavations at Tel es-Sa'idiyeh; would you know how to contact the neurologist, Vladimir Berginer. I have some information that might be of interest to support his theories.

          Comment


          • #6
            I hadn't actually heard of "In the Footsteps of Goliath" until I read your post. I googled it, found the name of the site, and then searched both the internet and the archaeological literature for information about the excavations.

            Comment


            • #7
              In the Footsteps of Goliath

              Originally posted by augustin25
              I hadn't actually heard of "In the Footsteps of Goliath" until I read your post. I googled it, found the name of the site, and then searched both the internet and the archaeological literature for information about the excavations.
              Hi augustin25, "In the Footsteps of Goliath" is a fascinating DVD that looks at Genetic Disorders, the Giants of Gath, and at Goliath - in an attempt to prove and validate the Bible and its content - and examines what he might have been afflicted with. Although I don't agree with the specific Genetic Neurological Disorder that the Neurologist concludes - because it would have rendered Goliath inept and without much physical agility - I do agree with some of his assertions. I think its hardly likely that Goliath would have been afflicted with the genetic disorder concluded when you consider he was the Champion of the Philistines. I would argue that Goliath would have been afflicted with a genetic disorder such as Pallister-Hall Syndrome [PHS] which includes a pituitary disorder caused by a Hypothalamic Hamartoma [Genetically caused Brain Tumour - a few examples are seen throughout the DVD] and extra digits [Polydactly] on the hands and/or feet. In the case of PHS patients, they are quite agile, and because of the pituitary issues, they can be quite tall, or short people with 6 or plus fingers. Anyhow, worth a look at.

              But if anyone out there knows how to contact the neurologist Vladimir Berginer, please provide his, or pass on my contact details.

              Thanks.

              Comment

              Working...
              X