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  • Native American CDIB & Admixture

    A friend of mine recently took an admixture test which confirmed she had 7% Native American heritage. Her genealogy indicates that a ggggrandmother was Cherokee.

    Does anyone know if the DNA Admixture tests can be provided as proof towards getting a Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB) issued by the Bureau of Indian Affairs?

    Does anyone know the rules in terms of who the government decides is a Native American?

    Look forward to hearing from you all,

    Ted

  • #2
    The authority to recognize tribal membership resides with the tribe and, for the most part, the evidence they want is conventional genealogical paperwork not DNA. Although DNA results might be accepted as confirmation of a well documented pedigree.

    Has your friend tested family mitochondrial or y-DNA?

    Comment


    • #3
      Hello,
      I am Cherokee. Using DNA resluts as "proof" of one's Indian-ness is still a very long way off for the Federally recognized Tribes; perhaps never. As a Tribal Genealogist once told me, "Someone may have Indian DNA, but it doesn't mean its our Tribe's DNA." Please do not be disappointed if you cannot get a CDIB card with only DNA. Truth is, there are far more undocumented and uncarded Indian People out there than there are fully enrolled Indians. Tribes for the most part do not want more carded Indians showing up seeking enrollment. Its a monetary thing mostly. Too many People and not enough money. Seems as though lots of folks out there want "free" Indian money and/or benefits. Therefore the Tribes are very protective of who they allow in.
      Respectfully,
      Bob

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bob Swinea
        Hello,
        Its a monetary thing mostly. Too many People and not enough money. Seems as though lots of folks out there want "free" Indian money and/or benefits. Therefore the Tribes are very protective of who they allow in.
        Respectfully,
        Bob
        This is very true.
        My mother was Cherokee and in my 20 years of doing genealogy I have found
        that most people just want to be relatives (on my mothers side). Whether they fit in our tree or not, they still try and fit themselves in.
        Of course I have NO Indian Y-DNA and I would need a female family member tested for that. I do not plan to have this done however (it’s up to the few females that we have left anyway and I don’t think they have any interest in that).
        I can see some person driving to the reservation and stating “Hi I’m Your Brother/Sister.
        This would go over like a lead balloon. I hope the Bureau of Indian Affairs will be able to keep this in tow. The ones that have contacted me… It’s just for the money, Baby.
        The Texas oil money was divided years ago. Only a hand full of people answered the investigators anyway. They sure yelled at me later when they found out money was involved. d

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bob Swinea
          Tribes for the most part do not want more carded Indians showing up seeking enrollment. Its a monetary thing mostly. Too many People and not enough money. Seems as though lots of folks out there want "free" Indian money and/or benefits. Therefore the Tribes are very protective of who they allow in.
          This is very true. I once sent a letter to a tribe to find out if they had my relatives in their genealogy records. They lived on or near the Indian reservation. The tribe wrote back and said that the surname did not exist in their records or within their tribe. But I investigated further and found that the tribal chief had that name. They were obviously trying to dissuade me.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by haplogroupc
            This is very true. I once sent a letter to a tribe to find out if they had my relatives in their genealogy records. They lived on or near the Indian reservation. The tribe wrote back and said that the surname did not exist in their records or within their tribe. But I investigated further and found that the tribal chief had that name. They were obviously trying to dissuade me.
            They do not want to be bothered.
            The tribe that I know well, all of their last names are Jerry or Super. (Hi Guys if you read this)
            They do not trust anything that the "White Man" tells them. We can't blame them. They have their own religion, law and very little trust of the outside world. They do go into the armed forces and are great ‘Troops”. When they get home they go back to their way of life. If you go for a visit, it is best to have been invited. d

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by teddy1066
              A friend of mine recently took an admixture test which confirmed she had 7% Native American heritage. Her genealogy indicates that a ggggrandmother was Cherokee.
              I got 8% Native American in the ABDNA 2.5 test, however all of my ancestors belong to Scandinavia. Should I be entitled to apply for tribal membership?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by haplogroupc
                This is very true. I once sent a letter to a tribe to find out if they had my relatives in their genealogy records. They lived on or near the Indian reservation. The tribe wrote back and said that the surname did not exist in their records or within their tribe. But I investigated further and found that the tribal chief had that name. They were obviously trying to dissuade me.
                Sounds like a southeastern Virginia Tribe that told me my relatives were not found on any of their records. Then I looked at the tax rolls that showed some of my relatives living on or near the reservation and showed to be Indian. Again the current Chief had the same last name as my ancestors.
                I even told them I did not care about any benefits, but just wanted to be recognized as a descendant of their tribe. They never replied back after almost a year.

                Comment


                • #9
                  One has to remember that “being Indian” is popular right now. Whether this is caused by someone’s lust for money or status in some church, etc. I don’t know..
                  Now the “white man” is after the Indians DNA. I wish a real Indian would give his/her side of the story. Can he/she be in trouble with their spirits if they submit their DNA?
                  There is way to much religion in Genealogy/DNA today. I have ran across many times that if you do not belong to my church you will get no information or help. I just like to do research on the deceased so I’m not prying in other peoples business. Whoever preaches this kind of thinking is just making enemies for their flock and practicing childish behavior.. Can you for a minute believe that talking to a Catholic about relatives cannot be tolerated if you are a Baptist? Silly, plain silly. This is one reason that I have quit doing genealogy. I have a raised eyebrow about what is happening in DNA testing results interpretation.
                  d

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by darroll
                    I wish a real Indian would give his/her side of the story. Can he/she be in trouble with their spirits if they submit their DNA?
                    There are articles about Native Americans who have taken DNA tests and who have gotten little or no percentage of Native American on their results. In addition, their mtDNA haplogroups and Y-DNA haplogroups are not Native American. Many Natives refuse to take the tests for fear that their results will be used against them, as a tool to remove them from the tribe.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by haplogroupc
                      There are articles about Native Americans who have taken DNA tests and who have gotten little or no percentage of Native American on their results. In addition, their mtDNA haplogroups and Y-DNA haplogroups are not Native American. Many Natives refuse to take the tests for fear that their results will be used against them, as a tool to remove them from the tribe.
                      haplogroupc,

                      Good answer.... And probably more truth in your comments than we know.
                      There has been a lot of marriages to “white girls”.
                      But.... Their Y-DNA should survive.
                      We still have to respect their beliefs, and all religions beliefs. I'm hoping their spiritual leaders will allow then to be DNA tested. DNA is a powerful tool if we can learn to use it right. dc

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB) issued by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the United States ?

                        I didn't know about this ?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bracari
                          A Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood (CDIB) issued by the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the United States ?

                          I didn't know about this ?
                          Shows what percent of Native American blood that person is and also the tribal affiliation. This is what people are referring to when they say"Card carrying Indian".

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Black Dutch
                            Shows what percent of Native American blood that person is and also the tribal affiliation. This is what people are referring to when they say"Card carrying Indian".
                            Can't see any impediment to 'someone' setting-up a registry for members of the Native American Diaspora based on reasonable proof of Native Ancestry not acceptable to the recognized tribes. With a large enough membership, political recognition might be ... inevitable

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by darroll
                              One has to remember that “being Indian” is popular right now. Whether this is caused by someone’s lust for money or status in some church, etc. I don’t know..
                              Now the “white man” is after the Indians DNA. I wish a real Indian would give his/her side of the story. Can he/she be in trouble with their spirits if they submit their DNA?
                              There is way to much religion in Genealogy/DNA today. I have ran across many times that if you do not belong to my church you will get no information or help. I just like to do research on the deceased so I’m not prying in other peoples business. Whoever preaches this kind of thinking is just making enemies for their flock and practicing childish behavior.. Can you for a minute believe that talking to a Catholic about relatives cannot be tolerated if you are a Baptist? Silly, plain silly. This is one reason that I have quit doing genealogy. I have a raised eyebrow about what is happening in DNA testing results interpretation.
                              d

                              Hi Darrol,

                              Umm, I AM a REAL Indian and I have spoken my part earlier in this thread.

                              Bob

                              Comment

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